What status, documentation , ID, or other, allows a "Haitian" to reside in the DR

NALs

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You're entitled to your opinions but you're not entitled to "fix" my posts. If you really want to fix something, try to fix your condescending attitude.
What if it's a problem that only exist in your head?

And as much as you didn't mention it in the original post that I quoted from you, Dominicans don't always identify a Haitian. Plenty of stories of, for example, African Americans that received one treatment because the Dominican thought they were Haitian and everything changed the moment they open their mouth.

Perhaps you should stop imagining this and simply accept the fact.
 

NALs

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That is what led me to posting this tread. This will be another version of catch 22. So now in the roundups hen the Haitian says here is my visa...huh, one year old?
I don't think it truly is a "catch 22" because many Haitians that do have a visa don't have the correct one. A few months ago there was a scandal of thousands of Haitians with a student visa, but the amount of Haitian students registered in Dominican university is much less than they amount of student visas issued to Haitians in the various Dominican consulates in Haiti. A similar situation exist with tourist visas, where most of the Haitians with one aren't true tourists. In fact, many are permanently living and working in the DR, when the tourist visa doesn't allow any of the two. If a foreigner wants to legally permanently live and work in the DR, they must have a resident visa and not a tourist one.

Many of the Haitians that have one type of visa but are doing things that the visa isn't for would claim that they are legal in the DR and while holding those visa means they are technically legal, having a student visa doesn't mean the Haitian is an actual student and having a tourist visa doesn't mean the Haitian is an actual tourists. Things like resident visas are renewed in the corresponding office in Santo Domingo, no need to leave the country for that.

There is another issue affecting Haitians and I think this is simply ignorance affecting them more than an actual issue from the system. This one is that many Haitians think that by simply having a document "proving" their legal presence in the DR, thst it automatically meansthey are legally in the country. They tend to ifnore things such as whether the document expired because it wasn't renewed or even if the document is a real one and not a copy of a real one that they bought in the streets. While for them possessing these things means they are legal, in reality it doesn't. That causes an issue when they are caught by authorities, because they claim they are legal and still deported, but the document id either expired or false. They seem not to accept that expired or false documents aren't valid.

Many of the Haitians with the incorrect visa or with an expired or false document usually benefitted from corruption as in all those instances they bought them (includes paying a bribe), but didn't truly qualify with the requirements to get them.
 

johne

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I don't think it truly is a "catch 22" because many Haitians that do have a visa don't have the correct one. A few months ago there was a scandal of thousands of Haitians with a student visa, but the amount of Haitian students registered in Dominican university is much less than they amount of student visas issued to Haitians in the various Dominican consulates in Haiti. A similar situation exist with tourist visas, where most of the Haitians with one aren't true tourists. In fact, many are permanently living and working in the DR, when the tourist visa doesn't allow any of the two. If a foreigner wants to legally permanently live and work in the DR, they must have a resident visa and not a tourist one.

Many of the Haitians that have one type of visa but are doing things that the visa isn't for would claim that they are legal in the DR and while holding those visa means they are technically legal, having a student visa doesn't mean the Haitian is an actual student and having a tourist visa doesn't mean the Haitian is an actual tourists. Things like resident visas are renewed in the corresponding office in Santo Domingo, no need to leave the country for that.

There is another issue affecting Haitians and I think this is simply ignorance affecting them more than an actual issue from the system. This one is that many Haitians think that by simply having a document "proving" their legal presence in the DR, thst it automatically meansthey are legally in the country. They tend to ifnore things such as whether the document expired because it wasn't renewed or even if the document is a real one and not a copy of a real one that they bought in the streets. While for them possessing these things means they are legal, in reality it doesn't. That causes an issue when they are caught by authorities, because they claim they are legal and still deported, but the document id either expired or false. They seem not to accept that expired or false documents aren't valid.

Many of the Haitians with the incorrect visa or with an expired or false document usually benefitted from corruption as in all those instances they bought them (includes paying a bribe), but didn't truly qualify with the requirements to get them.
I agree with all of the above although I don't know how migration will work around those very issues. What I meant about my comment of "catch22" was the issue of a Haitian here with a valid visa and the border is closed, how will he stay legal? (Visa that expires tomorrow, border is closed, he is now totaly illegal
 

Astucia

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I think you're referring to work visas, no? Why can't they get their visas renewed if they're legitimately working?
No - I don't think he is referring to work visas. Haitians with a visitor visa must renew them every 30 days - and the border closure will not allow them to do this.
 

bob saunders

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All I know is my friend Fredo dresses up in his best suit and tie and goes to Santo Domingo once a year to renew his work Visa. He is a cabinetmaker. He was married to a Haitian woman, and they have two children, both born in the DR. He has a Dominican girlfriend, and his daughter has a Dominican boyfriend. I think that the government will not kick people out that have legitimate papers that are now due to renew, but who knows.
 
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cavok

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What if it's a problem that only exist in your head?

And as much as you didn't mention it in the original post that I quoted from you, Dominicans don't always identify a Haitian. Plenty of stories of, for example, African Americans that received one treatment because the Dominican thought they were Haitian and everything changed the moment they open their mouth.

Perhaps you should stop imagining this and simply accept the fact.
No. This is a problem that only exists in your head. Tell me - just how many Dominicans(and I'm not talking about Dominicans that have Haitian ancestry) have ever been rounded up and thrown in a Migracion bus because they were thought to look Haitian? I have never yet heard one story like that. Post links. That would have surely made the news. The fact stands - Dominicans can easily recognize a Haitian in their midst. I've heard no reports yet of Dominicans being arrested by Migracion because they were thought to be Haitian. Maybe a once in a million event - if that. Get real.
 

johne

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All I know is my friend Fredo dresses up in his best suit and tie and goes to Santo Domingo once a year to renew his work Visa. He is a cabinetmaker. He was married to a Haitian woman, and they have two children, both born in the DR. He has a Dominican girlfriend, and his daughter has a Dominican boyfriend. I think that the government will not kick people out that have legitimate papers that are now due to renew, but who knows.
Visitor visa OK?
 

cavok

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No - I don't think he is referring to work visas. Haitians with a visitor visa must renew them every 30 days - and the border closure will not allow them to do this.
Oh, ok. How long are visitor visas usually good for? Can they just be renewed forever? That is really a pretty expensive and time consuming inconvenience to have to cross the border every 30 days to renew your visa.

A friend of mine had two Haitians working for him and they were always going to the Policia Nacional station in Puerto Plata. There were always a lot of Haitian's there out front waiting. I was told to renew visas(?).
 

NanSanPedro

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No. This is a problem that only exists in your head. Tell me - just how many Dominicans(and I'm not talking about Dominicans that have Haitian ancestry) have ever been rounded up and thrown in a Migracion bus because they were thought to look Haitian? I have never yet heard one story like that. Post links. That would have surely made the news. The fact stands - Dominicans can easily recognize a Haitian in their midst. I've heard no reports yet of Dominicans being arrested by Migracion because they were thought to be Haitian. Maybe a once in a million event - if that. Get real.
I did see a video of an American black rounded up like that. He must have pissed them off because his English was perfect. But I've never seen a Dominican rounded up.

Now my kid's older brother who is Haitian with a cedula was rounded up and spent one night in jail about a year ago or so. He was let go without a bribe the next morning.
 

cavok

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I did see a video of an American black rounded up like that. He must have pissed them off because his English was perfect. But I've never seen a Dominican rounded up.

Now my kid's older brother who is Haitian with a cedula was rounded up and spent one night in jail about a year ago or so. He was let go without a bribe the next morning.
I remember your story. Pretty bad. The only thing I can think of is maybe they thought the cedula was false(?). I have heard reports of fake ID's.

I have seen a lot of black Americans and a lot of Haitians but I've never seen a black American that I thought was a Haitian - and I don't have an eye for Haitians like Dominicans do because they are around them all the time, every day.
 
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NALs

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No. This is a problem that only exists in your head. Tell me - just how many Dominicans(and I'm not talking about Dominicans that have Haitian ancestry) have ever been rounded up and thrown in a Migracion bus because they were thought to look Haitian? I have never yet heard one story like that. Post links. That would have surely made the news. The fact stands - Dominicans can easily recognize a Haitian in their midst. I've heard no reports yet of Dominicans being arrested by Migracion because they were thought to be Haitian. Maybe a once in a million event - if that. Get real.
You mean this woman was lying when she said her Dominican housekeeper said that she always carry her céduls to avoid getting rounded up with the Haitians and deported?


There have been variousnews reports of black Dominicans getting stopped by Migración thinking they are Haitians. They even went as far as saying "no todo el que es prieto es haitiano." That you claim you have never seen that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

What was that about Cavok with problems that only exist in his head? Plop!
 

cavok

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There have been various(news reports of black Dominicans getting stopped by Migración thinking they are Haitians. They even went as far as saying "no todo el que es prieto es haitiano." That you claim you have never seen that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
Various. In other words - a few. So, maybe one out of every 10,000 Haitians deported, one was a Dominican that was initially misidentified, but as soon as she told them her name was Belkis and spoke perfect Dominican Spanish, which only maybe one in a million Haitians can do, she was immediately released. The are zero reports of any Dominican being mistakenly deported as you claim. It sounds like you have an agenda.
What was that about Cavok with problems that only exist in his head? Plop!
Me? Talk about making a mountain out of molehill. You're beginning to sound delusional. I think you need to get out more.
 

drstock

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Various. In other words - a few. So, maybe one out of every 10,000 Haitians deported, one was a Dominican that was initially misidentified, but as soon as she told them her name was Belkis and spoke perfect Dominican Spanish, which only maybe one in a million Haitians can do, she was immediately released. The are zero reports of any Dominican being mistakenly deported as you claim. It sounds like you have an agenda.

As I have said before, a friend of mine has been arrested more than once for looking Haitian, despite being Dominican with a valid cedula and speaking Dominican Spanish. She is of Haitian descent, but far enough back that she is completely legal. After spending some time in a cell, the police boss comes and checks her cedula and she is released - after paying a propina (for no good reason). She has never been deported but spending any time in a police cell is a horrible experience.

I have been accused of lying when I mentioned this before, but I know it is absolutely true.
 
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cavok

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As I have said before, a friend of mine has been arrested more than once for looking Haitian, despite being Dominican with a valid cedula and speaking Dominican Spanish. She is of Haitian descent, but far enough back that she is completely legal. After spending some time in a cell, the police boss comes and checks her cedula and she is released - after paying a propina (for no good reason). She has never been deported but spending any time in a police cell is a horrible experience.

I have been accused of lying when I mentioned this before, but I know it is absolutely true.
There you go. I did except Dominicans of Haitian ancestry because many will obviously look at least somewhat Haitian,. It's pathetic that the police don't have a way to check a valid cedula with an app on their smartphones.

Again, if you know anything about learning a new language, the accent is always the hardest thing to lose. I spoke Spanish when I came here. I've been here for 17 years. I still speak Spanish with an American accent. Your friend's Spanish may be somewhat fluent and sound good to you, but a Dominican will hear the Creole accent and will know.

I lived in Miami for a long time. There were many 2nd and even 3rd generation Cubans that went to school and grew up in Miami and were 100% fluent in English, but they still had a slight Spanish accent. The accent is very hard to lose.
 
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drstock

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Your friend's Spanish may be somewhat fluent and sound good to you, but a Dominican will hear the Creole accent and will know.

I lived in Miami for a long time. There were many 2nd and even 3rd generation Cubans that went to school and grew up in Miami and were 100% fluent in English, but they still had a slight Spanish accent. The accent is very hard to lose.
I don't see why my friend should have a Creole accent, having been born, educated and lived here all her thirty-four years.
 

cavok

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I don't see why my friend should have a Creole accent, having been born, educated and lived here all her thirty-four years.
Perhaps not(?). Does she speak Creole? As in the case with the Miami Cubans, their parents spoke Spanish in the house as well as having many friends that would speak Spanish when together so, despite being 100% fluent in English, they still had a Spanish accent.

Take Arnold Schwarzenegger for example. He's lived in the US for 40-50 years and still has an Austrian accent.
 

AlterEgo

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Accents are hard to lose. I left NY in 1980, but I still sound like one. My kids were born in southern NJ, I passed on some pronunciations and telltale words to them, especially my daughter. Coffee, water, chocolate. Dropped r’s. My son still puts out the garbage, which amuses his wife, because they only have trash down here.

Mr AE will never lose his accent, he’s been in USA 47 years. I will never sound like a Dominican.
 
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Big

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As I have said before, a friend of mine has been arrested more than once for looking Haitian, despite being Dominican with a valid cedula and speaking Dominican Spanish. She is of Haitian descent, but far enough back that she is completely legal. After spending some time in a cell, the police boss comes and checks her cedula and she is released - after paying a propina (for no good reason). She has never been deported but spending any time in a police cell is a horrible experience.

I have been accused of lying when I mentioned this before, but I know it is absolutely true.
yea,sure, like this is such a huge problem. People getting rounded up with a Dominican I.D The odds are better winning the lottery. I have seen the immigration transport vehicles. They are filled with Haitians! There is no incentive for the P.D to arrest an older woman with a cedula.