whats going on in La Ciénaga today???

NanSanPedro

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building on someone else's property is stealing! Many of the large vacant and defunct hotel and resorts on the north coast have 24/7 security to keep the low life squatters out that are looking for a free place to live

Please be careful with descriptions such as low life. I understand squatters are generally not wanted, but as previously stated, being poor sucks, especially here or in Haiti.

Walk a mile...
 

Big

Well-known member
Apr 24, 2019
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Please be careful with descriptions such as low life. I understand squatters are generally not wanted, but as previously stated, being poor sucks, especially here or in Haiti.

Walk a mile...
I agree with 97 % of your posts, this one I am way off on. Taking advantage of vacant property, buildings or any resource is stealing. To top it off the squatters always seem to dump their garbage, liquor bottles and personal waste wherever they desire, losers !!
 

ctrob

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Nov 9, 2006
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building on someone else's property is stealing!

I agree,.but I think those are more North American sentiments. I think most Doms don't see it as a big deal.

Case in point: Playa Sosua. Prime real estate, and no secret to the family that owns it that they have squatters. They have a whole village of squatters. The owner will deal with it when neccessary. Meanwhile .they're left alone.
 

Kricke87

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Feb 16, 2021
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I agree,.but I think those are more North American sentiments. I think most Doms don't see it as a big deal.

Case in point: Playa Sosua. Prime real estate, and no secret to the family that owns it that they have squatters. They have a whole village of squatters. The owner will deal with it when neccessary. Meanwhile .they're left alone.
"Playa Sosua. Prime real estate, and no secret to the family that owns it that they have squatters. "? What do you mean? Playa Sosúa is privately owned? I always had the understanding that it's government own, as it's public.
 

NanSanPedro

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I agree with 97 % of your posts, this one I am way off on. Taking advantage of vacant property, buildings or any resource is stealing. To top it off the squatters always seem to dump their garbage, liquor bottles and personal waste wherever they desire, losers !!

We'd be boring if we agreed on everything! But I do stand by my comment.
 
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Kricke87

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We'd be boring if we agreed on everything! But I do stand by my comment.
I can see it from both sides. Not EVERYONE that is living on someone else's land is a "bad" person. First of all, we don't know all of the circumstances of everyone living under these conditions. There might be some who are living there because they have made a deal with someone in charge, and for the time being, they are actually allowed to live there, just not forever, and fully knowing that "some" day they will have to leave. Then I'm certain there are some who just don't care and just infest the land and build whether or not they are actually allowed to. Then there are some who fully believe that they are actually entitled to the land because they have bought it, and fully believe that they have bought it from the rightful owner. There are a lot of gullible people here, that has no idea how things actually work.
And then we have the possibility that if it's a government-owned property, if you have followed the news, they've discovered ALOT of shady business being done by the previous administration (not at all surprised). So it's fully possible that people living in these areas actually made deals with people in the previous administrations, that although struck by a government official was actually not legal.
The real point is actually we don't know everything. So it's kind of harsh to judge people based on just what you can hear.
 

ctrob

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"Playa Sosua. Prime real estate, and no secret to the family that owns it that they have squatters. "? What do you mean? Playa Sosúa is privately owned? I always had the understanding that it's government own, as it's public.

When I said Playa Sosua I was referring to the whole parcel between the water and Rt5. 60 meters from the water is controlled by the coastal protection act. The rest is privately owned. And yes, the owners know there is a thriving community there. I heard they even have their own Mayor.
 

Kricke87

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When I said Playa Sosua I was referring to the whole parcel between the water and Rt5. 60 meters from the water is controlled by the coastal protection act. The rest is privately owned. And yes, the owners know there is a thriving community there. I heard they even have their own Mayor.
So you mean the businesses (restaurants all that)? Because I had understood that that was part of municipal control. Because to have your business there you have to pay to a union or something of some sort. Although one of my wife's uncles work at a restaurant and have quite a bit of influence, I have not bothered to get to know how that works. But what I do know is that in the 40s Trujillo gave away part of this land here in Sosúa to Jewish refugees. But I have no idea how that worked out afterwards, and if those families still own the majority of the land here in Sosúa or how it is.
 

ctrob

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So you mean the businesses (restaurants all that)? Because I had understood that that was part of municipal control. Because to have your business there you have to pay to a union or something of some sort. Although one of my wife's uncles work at a restaurant and have quite a bit of influence, I have not bothered to get to know how that works. But what I do know is that in the 40s Trujillo gave away part of this land here in Sosúa to Jewish refugees. But I have no idea how that worked out afterwards, and if those families still own the majority of the land here in Sosúa or how it is.

Yes, all those businesses on the beach. There are some businesses that are in the 60 meter setback. The rest are sitting on private property.
 

Big

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Apr 24, 2019
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I can see it from both sides. Not EVERYONE that is living on someone else's land is a "bad" person. First of all, we don't know all of the circumstances of everyone living under these conditions. There might be some who are living there because they have made a deal with someone in charge, and for the time being, they are actually allowed to live there, just not forever, and fully knowing that "some" day they will have to leave. Then I'm certain there are some who just don't care and just infest the land and build whether or not they are actually allowed to. Then there are some who fully believe that they are actually entitled to the land because they have bought it, and fully believe that they have bought it from the rightful owner. There are a lot of gullible people here, that has no idea how things actually work.
And then we have the possibility that if it's a government-owned property, if you have followed the news, they've discovered ALOT of shady business being done by the previous administration (not at all surprised). So it's fully possible that people living in these areas actually made deals with people in the previous administrations, that although struck by a government official was actually not legal.
The real point is actually we don't know everything. So it's kind of harsh to judge people based on just what you can hear.
Oh please!! No one makes a street corner deal and believes they are entitled to the land or a living arrangement. Most realize they have been getting over and when they are exposed they move on. Taking advantage of hard working business people and their holdings is a sport for bums and winos.
 
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ctrob

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Oh please!! No one makes a street corner deal and believes they are entitled to the land or a living arrangement. Most realize they have been getting over and when they are exposed they move on. Taking advantage of hard working business people and their holdings is a sport for bums and winos.

They may not be there "legally", but they are "allowed" to be there. See how that works? And there are some good people on the beach.

Don't be start'n up your Dozer, Big. Not just yet.
 

Big

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They may not be there "legally", but they are "allowed" to be there. See how that works? And there are some good people on the beach.

Don't be start'n up your Dozer, Big. Not just yet.
well I don't know what is and has been going on with the beach Casita's in Sosua, other people have more information on that. If it is government or privately owned I do not know. There was a beach casita in cab west that was in dispute and the business lady saw the writing on the wall and moved on. If you don't pay the rent or the mortgage you get the boot. If you are a squatter someone plays violins and feels fuzzy.
 

malko

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Jan 12, 2013
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I can see it from both sides. Not EVERYONE that is living on someone else's land is a "bad" person. First of all, we don't know all of the circumstances of everyone living under these conditions. There might be some who are living there because they have made a deal with someone in charge, and for the time being, they are actually allowed to live there, just not forever, and fully knowing that "some" day they will have to leave. Then I'm certain there are some who just don't care and just infest the land and build whether or not they are actually allowed to. Then there are some who fully believe that they are actually entitled to the land because they have bought it, and fully believe that they have bought it from the rightful owner. There are a lot of gullible people here, that has no idea how things actually work.
And then we have the possibility that if it's a government-owned property, if you have followed the news, they've discovered ALOT of shady business being done by the previous administration (not at all surprised). So it's fully possible that people living in these areas actually made deals with people in the previous administrations, that although struck by a government official was actually not legal.
The real point is actually we don't know everything. So it's kind of harsh to judge people based on just what you can hear.

And in some cases, what happened in the past is that finca workers would get authorisation from the big boss/owner, to build a shack/house---- usually roadside.
No legal documents, no nothing.
While "villages " sprouted up.

Fast forward 30 odd years.

The original big boss who allowed these houses built on his land, has died/become senile or whatnot.
His sons or grandkids may-- or may not--- have taken over the family businesses
The sons or grandkids of the original finca workers may--- or may not --- still work at the same finca.

Add to that children, grand children, entitled bastards-- literally-- who all want a piece of the pie and it becomes a total clusterfukc.

Even though the houses do not have land titles, they still have a foot to stand on in front of the dominican law.

Not saying it is the case in this particular situation, but here in wonderland it is always a bit more complicated than " LOw liFe bUms bAd ".
 
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Kricke87

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And in some cases, what happened in the past is that finca workers would get authorisation from the big boss/owner, to build a shack/house---- usually roadside.
No legal documents, no nothing.
While "villages " sprouted up.

Fast forward 30 odd years.

The original big boss who allowed these houses built on his land, has died/become senile or whatnot.
His sons or grandkids may-- or may not--- have taken over the family businesses
The sons or grandkids of the original finca workers may--- or may not --- still work at the same finca.

Add to that children, grand children, entitled bastards-- literally-- who all want a piece of the pie and it becomes a total clusterfukc.

Even though the houses do not have land titles, they still have a foot to stand on in front of the dominican law.

Not saying it is the case in this particular situation, but here in wonderland it is always a bit more complicated than " LOw liFe bUms bAd ".
And then add to that, that there might someone who wants to sell a piece of land, but isn't allowed by the rest of the "family members" but then does so anyways. And add to that, that here it's quite normal to have 10+ children that nobody knows of, so then those "reappear" and then the fight is on.... It's a very interesting country, to say the least.

Well, to bring back to main subject, what happened in La Cienaga here in Sosua/Cabarete. After seeing the local news. It's not a question about property of land, and it actually doesn't concern "main" part of La Cienaga. But the thing is, there is a part of La Sienaga that is actually like a swamp, or a lagoon and part of land close to it that is protected property by law. So people in their stupidity (which is truly is) have for a couple of years(not that long time, but more than 1 year but less than 5) been building on that, and basically building ontop of water. And because that's protected land and also because it's quite dangerous when there is flooding and such, they have been forced away.
So this is something else.

And to answer Big: Well you would be surprised how gullible some people are. There are those who just because their pastor or neighbour or whoever they trust says something, no matter how STUPID it is, they believe it. I remember when zika and chikungunya (spelling?) was news here a couple of years ago. People actually believed that it was something in the air that the US government had spread to infect them. I had a lot of "interesting" conversations with people, that firmly believed that.
So just because you think it's improbable that someone wouldn't think that doing a "street corner deal" they wouldn't be entitled to the land, I would just say, Good for you, but there are those people, I've seen it myself.
 

josh2203

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Dec 5, 2013
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Please be careful with descriptions such as low life. I understand squatters are generally not wanted, but as previously stated, being poor sucks, especially here or in Haiti.

I understand what you're saying, but just for the sake of sarcasm, where are squatters usually wanted?? I have seen horror stories for squatters in the UK and Spain, for example... That's off-topic for this forum, but it's unfortunately never the fault of the homeowner that they are poor, nor is it their responsibility to accommodate them... I have seen footage of squatters getting violent on homeowners, so I would agree that they are not exactly the best people around...

It's the problem of the respective government and the squatters should target them in their actions, not other, innocent people... The homeowners might have worked pretty hard to get the property in the first place...
 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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Are we forgetting just west of Magante, a few years back ? Just outside la Yagua
It was a topic here.
Squatters had moved in - block houses, not tin shacks .... the owner wanted them out.
The authorities came in and knocked them all down..... the rubble is there to this day

Here an article on the current topic - w/ an environmental slant

 
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JD Jones

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Jan 7, 2016
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Please be careful with descriptions such as low life. I understand squatters are generally not wanted, but as previously stated, being poor sucks, especially here or in Haiti.

Walk a mile...
Just an FYI.. Did you know that paid squatters exist? I'm not saying that's the case here, but I know of instances past when folks were paid to squat on certain properties for a variety of reasons.

My personal experience: Many years ago I bought 6 lots in a new residential property. I brought in a couple of guys to clean it up and install a barbed wire fence around them.

A few days later we went by to see the progress, and there were almost two dozen shacks that had popped up literally overnight.

I had no contact with them, but they told the owner of the property they would be willing to leave again.. for a price.
The property was owned by a general, and it only took a few days before they were all gone... without getting paid to leave.
I'm leaving a lot of details out of the story, but another general was behind the squatters occupying the area in the first place.
 
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william webster

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To be accurate.... My instance above.... went thru the courts
The owner was within his rights - it was the police who did the bldg removal
 

NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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Just an FYI.. Did you know that paid squatters exist? I'm not saying that's the case here, but I know of instances past when folks were paid to squat on certain properties for a variety of reasons.

My personal experience: Many years ago I bought 6 lots in a new residential property. I brought in a couple of guys to clean it up and install a barbed wire fence around them.

A few days later we went by to see the progress, and there were almost two dozen shacks that had popped up literally overnight.

I had no contact with them, but they told the owner of the property they would be willing to leave again.. for a price.
The property was owned by a general, and it only took a few days before they were all gone... without getting paid to leave.
I'm leaving a lot of details out of the story, but another general was behind the squatters occupying the area in the first place.

No, I didn't know that nor could I have conceived of it.

I also have experience with squatters too. All of it in Haiti and all of them single moms with no place to go. None of them were low lifes, which is the reason I responded.

Your example and others above shows that sometimes this is the case. My example shows that sometimes it's not.
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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No, I didn't know that nor could I have conceived of it.

I also have experience with squatters too. All of it in Haiti and all of them single moms with no place to go. None of them were low lifes, which is the reason I responded.

Your example and others above shows that sometimes this is the case. My example shows that sometimes it's not.
When you think about it, the real lowlifes are the ones who do it for political/financial gains. I agree most of the rest are just trying to deal with limited resources.