Why the DR is showing preference to its foreigners with residency

windeguy

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While the idea seems to be a good one. The requirements and process for obtaining an extension still seem a bit too onerous to appeal to many tourists who wish to stay longer than 30 days. Paying the exit fee/fine when leaving doesn't involve a medical exam or filling out forms or having to go to a govt office. The cost of the legal extension seems to be the same as the overstay fees/fines so there doesn't seem to be an incentive to put out the extra effort. Now if tourists start getting hassled about overstaying and not obtaining an extension, that would constitute incentive and maybe then some would opt to jump through the hoops to extend. I suspect that most will not bother until there is a very tangible reason to do so.

The program indicates you can pay online, at DGM in Santo Domingo or at the airport. Anyone know where at the airport one can pay to extend?. People without a boarding pass probably can't get to the exit fee cashier window.
This thread is about residency. Even I think there are enough overstay fee threads.
 

Dawiky502

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Aug 10, 2020
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It would be good to know how the government would handle some one and that comes extends for 120 days, goes back 1 week and comes back for 120 days again. Pretty much living here without a residency but legal under their regulations.
All those scenarios should br adressed by the dgm
 

John Boyter

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I would follow it closely right now and wait and see but maybe start looking into it and pick a lawyer. They may make it easier as a way of helping the economy. A smaller RE investment maybe. Also that you can start application here would be good. Before you could come stay as tourist and stay 1-2 years and during this period see if you like it here and inquire and find your lawyer or take your time and do it yourself. I dont agree residents with or without cedula aren't important for the economy. Maybe not so much on the large scale and in Punta Cana and Santo Domingo as a foreign resident you feel like a drop in the ocean. In Punta Cana compared to the AI tourists and in Santo Domingo the locals. But I think its different in the smaller tourist based communities like Bayahibe, Sosua, Cabarete and Las Terrenas and others. I see it in Las Terrenas at restaurants and shops.
 

windeguy

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I would follow it closely right now and wait and see but maybe start looking into it and pick a lawyer. They may make it easier as a way of helping the economy. A smaller RE investment maybe. Also that you can start application here would be good. Before you could come stay as tourist and stay 1-2 years and during this period see if you like it here and inquire and find your lawyer or take your time and do it yourself. I dont agree residents with or without cedula aren't important for the economy. Maybe not so much on the large scale and in Punta Cana and Santo Domingo as a foreign resident you feel like a drop in the ocean. In Punta Cana compared to the AI tourists and in Santo Domingo the locals. But I think its different in the smaller tourist based communities like Bayahibe, Sosua, Cabarete and Las Terrenas and others. I see it in Las Terrenas at restaurants and shops.
In the total scheme of tourism, residents, legal or illegal, are not even a consideration to the central government of the DR in the decisions they make. This new government is extremely focused on AI tourism, which is what they feel needs their complete attention to help it recover. The total number of residents is a drop in the bucket over all.
 

NanSanPedro

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In the total scheme of tourism, residents, legal or illegal, are not even a consideration to the central government of the DR in the decisions they make. This new government is extremely focused on AI tourism, which is what they feel needs their complete attention to help it recover. The total number of residents is a drop in the bucket over all.
Here we actually agree. By my count 1.26% of the total AI numbers, using 2017 data. This excludes Haitians.

 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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John Boyter
I see your point about certain pockets of expat residents/long termers
LT especially fits the bill

But from the eagle's eye view, their numbers & impact on the GNP are less than insignificant

We - here in Cabrera - are a well known group & not w/o respect.....
Do we carry the pail ? I don't think so.... but contributing.... Yes, certainly

Summertime is the acid test..... how many expats float the boat ??
 

chussenet

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Jan 16, 2016
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I would love to see those kind of announcement facilitating the residency process coming from the government itself than a lawyer making a couple of thousand dollars per applicant.

Announcement should highlight the changes to make the process easier ,new benefits for resident ,time line to be put in place and at the end how long it's takes to get the residency.....

Until now ,the process was costly because the lawyer was there to help navigating in the DR bureaucracy.
I would expect that the cost should be lower or if same cost ,a bigger part of the cost should go to the government to make the process easier .

Peace.
 

johne

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Jun 28, 2003
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In the total scheme of tourism, residents, legal or illegal, are not even a consideration to the central government of the DR in the decisions they make. This new government is extremely focused on AI tourism, which is what they feel needs their complete attention to help it recover. The total number of residents is a drop in the bucket over all.
Without question this is correct. Many parts of the world are in a like and similar situation. What is needed here is a counter clicker at the airports that goes click, click. click click ALL day long 24/7 !!
 

NALs

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I will never understand this necessity (?) of some expats to believe that the DR survives because of them.The DR survives because of Dominicans by sheer size. Except for a few (and they are very few) places such as Sosúa where the impact of the expats is greater, most of the DR starting right at the border of these handful of municipalities things exist and survive inspite of whatever contribution from expats.

It would had been great if the expat economic impact would had been relevant for the overall Dominican economy, because consumption and production (not to mention imports and exports) would had been much greater than they are right now. Considerably more people with a stable job, most likely wages would had been higher, and just the overall development of the country would had been greater. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

The impact of tourists is one thing, the impact of expats is something else, and then is the impact of Dominicans which is greater than the previous two. The name Dominican Republic still has a strong correlation with reality.
 
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etolw

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Oct 6, 2018
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@NALs

I agree with the views in your post above, of course, although I cant see which post in this thread made you write
»I will never understand this necessity (?) of some expats to believe that the DR survives because of them»
Myself never had such a thought and do not know any other expat that has such a view.

My contribution to the economy as an expat is about about 12 times more than me as a tourist staying 3 weeks once a year.
What I used to spend on 3 weeks vacation, last one month now living as an expat with family.

Tiny contribution, but a positive one :)
 

Luperon

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Jun 28, 2004
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Its this type of thinking that destroys economies. The only thing she is missing is her rose colored glasses. The last count in 2018 there where over 80,000 hotel rooms in all the DR. Probably closer to 100,000 now. Prior to the pandemic lets say the ran at 70% occupancy (which is low)on a year round basis.

So 70% of 80,000 rooms = 56,000 rooms per day x 2 people per room = 112,000 people. Average them at a 10 day stay per room so the yearly turn of these people is over 5 million visitors per year. (The DR tourism office says 6.5 million but I'm shooting low here) That equals hundreds of thousands of workers. Think gardeners, maids, cooks, airport staff, food production, farmers maintenance workers and the list goes on and on. It also equals billions of dollars of revenue per year.

Now don't get me wrong the expats (of which I am one) contribute a lot to the DR economy but even the most creative accountant in the world cannot compare the expat/ immigration group with tourism and say its equal to or better. That's insane. I will make a note of the firm this woman is with and vow to never a spend a dime with these people. There lunatics' and the last thing I will ever willing do is encourage stupid.

If this is her plan on how to get business from people trying to immigrate here run for the sake of your wallet.
I did not watch the video... But imo, after November 3rd a lot of people will be wanting to leave America, especially the high tax cities. If the DR made it extremely easy and advertised it, I think they could get serious numbers.
 
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John Boyter

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I did not watch the video... But imo, after November 3rd a lot of people will be wanting to leave America, especially the high tax cities. If the DR made it extremely easy and advertised it, I think they could get serious numbers.
The key is here making it easy. Not if it means you need a lawyer and annually a tax accountant. You might find America is easier. Still the RE here should be less and living expenses.
 

cavok

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I think the amount of money that expats contribute to the economy is being greatly underestimated. According to the link below(and also the one posted by NSP), out of about 60,000 total expats, there are about 34,700 expats here from just the the US, Canada, and major European countries. This wouldn't include all the expats here that are living as perpetual tourists.

Almost all of these are retirees or "rentistas" bringing in money from outside the country. In addition, many of these expats also start businesses and create jobs, further contributing to the economy.

Assuming an average monthly income of $2000/mo(and I think that's on the low side), this equals $833 million dollars/yr coming into the economy. Not exactly chump change. $833 million dollars is about 11% is about 11% of the reported $7.7 billion dollars from tourism - not an insignificant drop in the bucket as some are saying.

The government could easily increase these numbers by streaming the residency process, making it easier, and offering incentives as many other countries have done - all at very little cost to the government. I don't know if the OP is correct, but the government is foolish if they're not trying harder to attract expats.

.
 

johne

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The key is here making it easy. Not if it means you need a lawyer and annually a tax accountant. You might find America is easier. Still the RE here should be less and living expenses.
Well, regarding RE, that subject is dear to my heart. The price of RE is what the owner wants and imagines his palace is worth. Here in the DR it seems market conditions, comps, intrinsic values etc. play NO part in what the asking price is. For that reason, over the past 18 years I never have bought a property in the DR. As a person that buys and sells RE to put food on my table , this is the first time I have rented (other than a hotel room) in my life. It's a GREAT feeling.
 
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John Boyter

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I will never understand this necessity (?) of some expats to believe that the DR survives because of them.The DR survives because of Dominicans by sheer size. Except for a few (and they are very few) places such as Sosúa where the impact of the expats is greater, most of the DR starting right at the border of these handful of municipalities things exist and survive inspite of whatever contribution from expats.

It would had been great if the expat economic impact would had been relevant for the overall Dominican economy, because consumption and production (not to mention imports and exports) would had been much greater than they are right now. Considerably more people with a stable job, most likely wages would had been higher, and just the overall development of the country would had been greater. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

The impact of tourists is one thing, the impact of expats is something else, and then is the impact of Dominicans which is greater than the previous two. The name Dominican Republic still has a strong correlation with reality.
Expats are just tourists to. Just staying longer with or with legal residency. Tourism is important for the economy.
 
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John Boyter

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Well, regarding RE, that subject is dear to my heart. The price of RE is what the owner wants and imagines his palace is worth. Here in the DR it seems market conditions, comps, intrinsic values etc. play NO part in what the asking price is. For that reason, over the past 18 years I never have bought a property in the DR. As a person that buys and sells RE to put food on my table , this is the first time I have rented (other than a hotel room) in my life. It's a GREAT feeling.
I don’t think buying a home here helps to get residency anyway.
 

Dawiky502

Member
Aug 10, 2020
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I think the amount of money that expats contribute to the economy is being greatly underestimated. According to the link below(and also the one posted by NSP), out of about 60,000 total expats, there are about 34,700 expats here from just the the US, Canada, and major European countries. This wouldn't include all the expats here that are living as perpetual tourists.

Almost all of these are retirees or "rentistas" bringing in money from outside the country. In addition, many of these expats also start businesses and create jobs, further contributing to the economy.

Assuming an average monthly income of $2000/mo(and I think that's on the low side), this equals $833 million dollars/yr coming into the economy. Not exactly chump change. $833 million dollars is about 11% is about 11% of the reported $7.7 billion dollars from tourism - not an insignificant drop in the bucket as some are saying.

The government could easily increase these numbers by streaming the residency process, making it easier, and offering incentives as many other countries have done - all at very little cost to the government. I don't know if the OP is correct, but the government is foolish if they're not trying harder to attract expats.

.
This is great analysis, to add to this expats usually come and spend money on local businesses, eg: colmados, restaurants, malls, cars etc. AI hotels pretty much just give jobs but all that money goes back to corporates in Spain, USA and Mexico. If tourism and the DGM did a thorough analysis on expats they'd figure out it is not pocket change they bring here and make it easier to come. People need to remember immigrants are usually good news unless they are criminals or come to take jobs, that's what they need to look for.
 

william webster

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Although I may sound like a disagree.... I understand the expat contribution

I just don't feel it is as significant as others do.... not insignificant , but not that large.

The AI's have all that employment... all that food (what? 30-35% of the production?)....
Liquor sales..... excursions ....
Huge spinoffs.

Long reaching tentacles and numbers that expats do not have.

Yes, I favor an easier residency process - and hope to see some ideas from Abinader et al.

Nonetheless, the current programs are aimed at the tourism industry - not Migracion
That in itself indicates where the numbers are.

Here - we are all guessing - I doubt the gov't is guessing as much as we are
They have a better book of numbers.... hopefully