Words, words and more words

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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I just thought of another word while posting in another thread.

To park:


Estacionar or Estacionarse

Aparcar

Parquear
-anglicism


-MP.
Even more of an Anglicism in Spain where a car park (parking lot) is el parking. Unusual because Anglicisms are more common in Latin American Spanish.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Even more of an Anglicism in Spain where a car park (parking lot) is el parking. Unusual because Anglicisms are more common in Latin American Spanish.

But maybe that is to differentiate it from aparcamiento which is a parking lot in the traditional sense.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Here is another word:

Jeans or Bluejeans


Bluejeans, jeans or bluyín (the phonetic spelling also accepted by the RAE)

Vaqueros

Mahones

Tejanos
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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Here is another word:

Jeans or Bluejeans


Bluejeans, jeans or bluyín (the phonetic spelling also accepted by the RAE)

Vaqueros

Mahones

Tejanos
I've never heard mahones.
I came across another word for jeans in Cuba but can't remember it. I looked it up and found pitusa (after an old brand name from the 1950s) but still not sure it was the same word I heard.
Pantalones de mezclilla, tejanos and Levis (as in the brand name) are other words for jeans in different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.
 

NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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I've never heard mahones.
I came across another word for jeans in Cuba but can't remember it. I looked it up and found pitusa (after an old brand name from the 1950s) but still not sure it was the same word I heard.
Pantalones de mezclilla, tejanos and Levis (as in the brand name) are other words for jeans in different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.
What is the most common here?
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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I've never heard mahones.
I came across another word for jeans in Cuba but can't remember it. I looked it up and found pitusa (after an old brand name from the 1950s) but still not sure it was the same word I heard.
Pantalones de mezclilla, tejanos and Levis (as in the brand name) are other words for jeans in different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.
I don’t think mahones is common but it exists. I don’t know how I know it either but I do.

Have a look here:

 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Some of the many words in Spanish for beans. The ones in bold are used in the Dominican Republic.
Habas, habichuelas, frijoles, judias, caraotas, alubias, porotos, vainitas.

More names are listed in this thread.

Yes, there are plenty of words for beans in Spanish. The ones you listed are quite common then there is the Colombian variation fríjol vs the standard frijol.
 

carlos

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 29, 2002
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I have never heard of Mahones but have heard and know people that have said Mahon to describe jeans. It is used but not as common.

Wisin and Yandel had a hit song called Pegao where they use the word to describe tight jeans.


part of lyrics:


Ella lo baila pegao, pegao, pegao, pegao
Y el mahon bien apretao
Bien pegao, pegao, pegao (Ehhh...)

 
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Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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I've never heard mahones.
I came across another word for jeans in Cuba but can't remember it. I looked it up and found pitusa (after an old brand name from the 1950s) but still not sure it was the same word I heard.
Pantalones de mezclilla, tejanos and Levis (as in the brand name) are other words for jeans in different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.
Check out the comments in this blog.

https://spanishskulduggery.tumblr.com%2Fpost%2F67717222057
 
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Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Here is a video to support the topic of this thread. Spanish is one language with a lot variety but mutually intelligible. It is unusual that Spanish speakers from different countries can’t understand each other. Words, expressions and pronunciation will vary and you can run into some challenges but considering how different it can be from region to region people understand each other.