Words, words and more words

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Here are words that tend to differ in Spain vs Latin America:


zumo vs jugo

coger vs tomar (in most scenarios) especially when entering into a form of transportation

levantarse vs pararse (in many scenarios)

neumático vs llanta, goma

conducir vs manejar

patata vs papa

coche vs carro

maletero vs baúl

vídeo vs video - I definitely prefer and will always say it the Latin American way



-MP.
 
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Marianopolita

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Another word for tyre is caucho - in Venezuela.

A couple more:
Mandar vs enviar
Enseñar vs mostrar
Yes, I have heard caucho for tire. I have seen signs in Miami but not in Venezuela. I am guessing because the material it is made of they just use the word for tire too.


Since they use caucho how do they say in Venezuela ‘I got a flat tire’?
 

Chirimoya

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Yes, I have heard caucho for tire. I have seen signs in Miami but not in Venezuela. I am guessing because the material it is made of they just use the word for tire too.


Since they use caucho how do they say in Venezuela ‘I got a flat tire’?
Tengo un caucho pinchado. Also, un pinchazo but that's used in other countries too.
 
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Chirimoya

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Yes, in the DR you'd say se me pinchó una goma. And in Venezuela, se me pinchó un caucho as well as the other way of phrasing it.

Where is ponchar used in this context apart from Mexico?
 

Marianopolita

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Yes, in the DR you'd say se me pinchó una goma. And in Venezuela, se me pinchó un caucho as well as the other way of phrasing it.

Where is ponchar used in this context apart from Mexico?
I do not know if it’s specific to one country but definitely Latin American.

Edited to add: it may be Mexican but heard in communities where there are Spanish speakers from different countries.


 
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Marianopolita

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Yes, in the DR you'd say se me pinchó una goma. And in Venezuela, se me pinchó un caucho as well as the other way of phrasing it.

Where is ponchar used in this context apart from Mexico?
Info on ponchar y pinchar

 
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Marianopolita

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Apurado/a means 'worried' in Spain and 'in a hurry' in Latin America.
I have always associated the difference in meaning by the context and not thinking of it as a regionalism.


Does apurado only mean worried in Spain and not to be in a hurry. One has to say tener prisa to be understood?
 
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Marianopolita

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More on Spain vs Latin America:

calcetines vs. medias


How do they say panties in Spain? Bragas?
 

Chirimoya

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I have always associated the difference in meaning by the context and not thinking of it as a regionalism.

Does apurado only mean worried in Spain and not to be in a hurry.
In my experience, it does, although it would be good to have this confirmed by someone with a broader experience of Iberian Spanish.

One has to say tener prisa to be understood?
Tener prisa is the usual way to say being in a hurry. For 'hurry up' Latin Americans say apúrate but I've always heard aligérate from Spanish speakers from Spain. Don't think I've ever heard that here in the DR. Also al paso vs. despacio.

What about apenado vs avergonzado in Spain?
I think avergonzado is more common. Apenado is more like feeling sad or sorry for someone but I looked it up and these distinctions vary a lot within Latin America as well.

How do they say panties in Spain? Bragas?
Yes. Bragas or braguitas.
 
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Marianopolita

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There are quite a few differences in meaning with the above mentioned words. However, since the words are not slang people will understand because of the context. If it were slang it would be difficult to understand.The dictionary offers various meanings and examples of usage which helps.



apenado meaning embarrassed is used a lot in Latin America.

 
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Marianopolita

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What about the word blanket? On an airplane travelling in Latin America and the air conditioning is on so high it is often too cold and uncomfortable. You ask the attendant for a blanket. What do you say? :unsure:

blanket

airline attendant


What are the words in Spanish?
 

Marianopolita

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The usage of guagua in an expression:

De guagua= free, gratis, no charge



Then guagua as a word on its own has more than one meaning in Latin America. Caribbean vs South America.
 
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Chirimoya

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What about the word blanket? On an airplane travelling in Latin America and the air conditioning is on so high it is often too cold and uncomfortable. You ask the attendant for a blanket. What do you say? :unsure:

blanket

airline attendant


What are the words in Spanish?
Manta, cobija and another word I can't think of now.
For me, abrigo is a coat. Here I've heard it used to mean any warm garment like a sweater, sweatshirt or jacket. I don't think I've heard the word chaqueta.
 

Chirimoya

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The usage of guagua in an expression:

De guagua= free, gratis, no charge



Then guagua as a word on its own has more than one meaning in Latin America. Caribbean vs South America.
In some South American countries, it means baby, a Quechua word. It's onomatopoeic, based on the 'wah wah' sound of a baby crying. Probably also the root of the bus meaning, from the sound of the horn.
 
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Marianopolita

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Manta, cobija and another word I can't think of now.
For me, abrigo is a coat. Here I've heard it used to mean any warm garment like a sweater, sweatshirt or jacket. I don't think I've heard the word chaqueta.
Maybe you are thinking of frazada as the other word for blanket.


Words used for coat, jacket, sweater vary a lot in Latin America. I will come back to this.
 
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