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  1. #1
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    Default Quality Of Life In D.r ??

    hello again,

    i just wondered if there is actually any quality of life in the dom rep apart from desperate men/women looking for 'love'

    sorry about the sarcasm, but...

    is there not a better way of life for children there???

    is the pace of life not slower ??

    isnt the wildlife and marine life good ??

    please, isnt there anybody who has a better quality of life out there or is it just the crappest place on the earth.

    because i was led to believe differently.

    appreciate objective opinions

    maria

  2. #2
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    mariainspain, posters have given you good answers on some of the other threads. You will only see and experience the differences from country to country when you actually live here for a while. All the discussions in the world is not going to give you a better flavor than the one already presented on this board.

    I would suggest take some time off, rent a place on the North Coast, buy tickets for you and your kids and try it out first.

  3. #3
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    Thing is, taking into account the elements you state you wish to avoid eliminates the main options - big cities are fast-paced, north coast is full of expats, and crime is on the rise. It is better for children in some ways - this being a child-centered culture, but lacking in others. Quality of life is superior in some ways, inferior in others - especially when it comes to state services.

    Santiago and Jarabacoa might just fit your criteria, but as Chris says, you really need to come and see for yourself.

  4. #4
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    maria, there are a lot of us on the message board that are not chasing girls and who have lived here a long time. Chris, Hillbilly, Rocky, Eddy are names that immediately come to mind. Hillbilly has been here more than 30 years, I'm in my 21st, Rocky a year or two more than me, not sure about Eddy and Chris, but they are old timers. We are not forced to stay here and would not still be here if this was as bad as some of the posters make it sound.

    Whether this is the place for you is not something you can learn from this message board. You have to come here and spend enough time to determine if you can adjust to the pace of life, Dominican time, the way things are done here,etc.

  5. #5
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    Nearly 15 years here & we're not moving. All of the long termers still here have made all the expat adjustments they need to & are content. Remember that you get posts from people at the 1)unconscious incompetence stage then at the 2) conscious incompetence stage then at 3) the conscious competence stage (sometimes the most strident of all ) & finally 4) at the unconscious competence stage. Most of the contented long termers are in stage 4. I've written an article on this on a travel writers site if you want me to send you the link. You, Maria, are already a long term expat, are you not? So much of the stuff people go through is already behind you. Talk to people like JDSauser. He was already a long term expat when he moved here and his process of settling whilst maybe not complete as yet, has been far less traumatic than many. Like you, he came with fluent Spanish. Makes a difference.

  6. #6
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    Unhappy

    Lambada, Im interested in your link to your article. Im also interested to know more about the expats on this site . . . why did they decide to move to the RD? What do they do to support themselves? All I've seen so far is that Rocky owns a bar. I'm also curious about this apparent oxymoron: you (not you personally, but the general advice given by many of you who've made the leap) say come experience it, come live here and try it out, ==== at the same time, anyone who says "I'm going to do it now" seems to get trashed. Maybe your article will explain this.

    The next time I'm there, I'd love to meet some of you (end of June, in Higuey, Santiago, and Sto. Dom.) but I admit I'm intimidated. I can't tell if you really want anymore "foreigners" there. And I understand not wanting anymore of an "invasion" from outsiders. It happens here in the US in many places.

    I agree with Mariaspain's question, isn't there something more to the RD than all the negatives???? I would guess that most of us reading this board have found something positive there. Thats why we spend our time at this site and not others.

    And this being the Living forum, well . . .

    can anyone explain, what gives?
    \\

    ps. this site is FULL of information!!! I'm in awe of how much so many of you know about so many topics. And I'm grateful to you for sharing it. I just don't understand the negativity when anyone mentions they're considering moving there. (I get the humidity, blackouts, drugs & crime - anywhere you won't find that? -, corrupt govt -again, anywhere it's not happening? -, ) There is something incredibly positive about what drew me or others to this place.

  7. #7
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    many thanks for the info everybody.

    i agree with vegasdiva, you cant be sure if some of the posters are saying such negatives because they dont want more foreigners there, god if i could have my village back to how it was 5 yrs ago i would.

    all it is now is brits on benefits, major cocaine problems, the town hall grabbing the half of your garden and the owners of the houses having to pay for the offense and it is illegal but they are doing it, eastern europeans opening up more brothels than shops, and if they are not doing that they are breaking into your house burgling you and beating the hell out of you, ontop of this half a mile away, the local skip owner has been emptying septic tanks and dumping pure sewarage and s.it in a field next to houses and the international school, well imagine the smell and disease in 35 degrees heat.

    so believe me, i think its a general reflection of the world in general.

    a big thanks for all the sound ideas

    maria

  8. #8
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    Mariainspain all the advice you have gotten is based on individual experiences and is true whether negative or positive. If you have kids you will want to live in a city like Santiago. The quality of life that you live will really be up to you.
    I am not sure about the wildlife but there is an abundance of marine life all around the island.

  9. #9
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    "I am not sure about the wildlife but there is an abundance of marine life all around the island."

    There isn't much wildlife other than birds and feral pigs. And in the quest to feed a burgeoning pet shop market, the Dominican parakete (little bright green parrot) has all but been hunted to near extinction. Waters surrounding the island have all but been fished out in less than 140' in an effort to feed a hungry population. This not only includes bottom fish such as grouper and snapper but lobsters as well which primarily feed the hungry tourists. It's sad what's happened/happening to this island's natural resources.

  10. #10
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    I've been in the country now for over 11 years from Juan Dolio to Santo Domingo to more recently Punta Cana and I'm not planning on leaving any time soon. Sure, it's not a perfect country, it's got its bad stuff, but there are plenty of good things too! All depends on what you want to get out of life and how you adapt to new situations. Yes, things are generally a bit slower here and depending on where you live you'll feel it more or less. In Punta Cana for example, the pace is mucho slower than Santo Domingo. There are almost never traffic jams, you don't hear about violence every day, you don't see drug dealers on street corners and you don't even get a feel of what's going on in politics unless you look at the news! (not that I'm saying that all this happends in SD)

    My recommendation, keep reading the good and the bad and see if it fits in with what you're looking for.

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