A real tearjerker

NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com
https://apnews.com/article/sint-maa...states-haiti-8a516a141f9d104e497c51598a075de3

This is from my Haiti feed. I can't believe they expect sympathy for this guy.

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Paul Pierrilus was deported two years ago from the U.S. to Haiti where he has been trying to survive in a chaotic and violent country where he wasn’t born and had never lived.

Both his parents are Haitian but they emigrated to the French Caribbean territory of St. Martin where Pierrilus was born. The family did not apply for citizenship for him in either Haiti or St. Martin and later moved to the U.S. when he was 5. He grew up in New York speaking English.

Deported — after a long delay — because of a drug conviction two decades ago, Pierrilus is now in Haiti where he does not speak Haitian Creole, has been unable to find work and has little savings left as he hopes for a way to leave the increasingly unstable country.

“You have to be mentally strong to deal with this type of stuff,” Pierrilus said. “A country where people get kidnapped every day. A country where people are killed. You have to be strong.”

The 42-year-old financial consultant spends most of his days locked inside a house reading self-help, business and marketing books in a neighborhood where gunshots often echo outside.

Lawyers for Pierrilus in the U.S. are still fighting his deportation order, leaving him in legal limbo as the Biden administration steps up deportations to Haiti despite pleas from activists that they be temporarily halted because of the Caribbean country’s deepening chaos.

His case has become emblematic of what some activists describe as the discrimination Haitian migrants face in the overburdened U.S. immigration system. More than 20,000 Haitians have been deported from the U.S. in the past year as thousands more continue to flee Haiti in risky boat crossings that sometimes end in mass drownings.

Cases like Pierrilus’ in which people are deported to a country where they have never lived are unusual, but they happen occasionally.

Jimmy Aldaoud, born of Iraqi parents at a refugee camp in Greece and whose family emigrated to the U.S. in 1979, was deported in 2019 to Iraq after amassing several felony convictions. Suffering health problems and not knowing the language in Iraq, he died a few months later in a case oft-cited by advocates.

Pierrilus’ parents took him to the United States so they could live a better life and he could receive a higher quality education.

When he was in his early 20s, he was convicted of selling crack cocaine. Because he was not a U.S. citizen, Pierrilus was transferred from criminal custody to immigration custody where he was deemed a Haitian national because of his parentage and ordered deported to Haiti.

Pierrilus managed to delay deportation with several legal challenges. Because he was deemed neither a danger to the community nor a flight risk, he was released, issued a work authorization and ordered to check with immigration authorities yearly.

He went on to become a financial planner. Then, in February 2021, he was deported without warning, and his lawyers don’t know exactly why his situation changed.

Lawyers for the nonprofit Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights organization in Washington have taken up his cause. “We demand that the Biden administration bring Paul home,” organization attorney Sarah Decker said.

French St. Martin does not automatically confer French citizenship to those born in its territory to foreign parents, and his family did not seek it. They also did not formally seek Haitian citizenship, which Pierrilus is entitled to.

Though he could obtain Haitian citizenship, his lawyers have argued that he is not currently a Haitian citizen, had never lived there and should not be deported to a county with such political instability.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in a brief general statement to The Associated Press that each country has an obligation under international law to accept the return of its nationals who are not eligible to remain in the U.S. or any other country. An ICE spokeswoman said no further information about Pierrilus’ case could be provided, including what proof does the U.S. government have that he’s an alleged Haitian citizen and why 13 years passed before he was suddenly deported.
 
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Joseph NY2STI

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If you're wondering, as I did, why Paul was deported to Haiti......According to his writ of habeus corpus (sorry, can't post it), as part of plea deal in a separate case in state court his lawyer at the time told the court he was a Haitian citizen . The article omitted that. Also, he did not appeal his 2004 deportation order, although he attempted to "challenge" it in 2005 because the window for appeal had closed. The article omitted that too. Paul's current appeal is largely based on claims of "ineffective counsel" as well as violations of his 5th and 6th amendment rights. These are pretty much boilerplate appeal grounds. I'm guessing his drug conviction won't do him any favors.
 

mountainannie

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Don't know about this particular case - but do have a Dominican friend who served 10 years in the US prison system for selling crack - and AFTER that was deported to the DR ( clean and sober now for 25 years and runs the English NA group in the capital)

No one - or at least I can perhaps assume that no one on this board - has any sympathy for any Haitian (or anyone) who is deported from the USA after being convicted of a felony.

And now since the new immigration allowance there is a route for all the middle class Haitians who are trying to escape to form an orderly line and come in legally - there will be an INSTANT deportation of all #Haltians arriving at either the Southern border with Mexico or off shore in Florida. (and all those who make that trip are easily considered middle class in Haiti since it is very $$ to get across one way or another)

I don't know anyone who supports illegal immigration.
 

CristoRey

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No one - or at least I can perhaps assume that no one on this board - has any sympathy for any Haitian (or anyone) who is deported from the USA after being convicted of a felony.
Do you?

I'm starting to get the impression you've never been beaten, robbed, raped, car jacked, pistol whipped or shot by a felon before have you?
 
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FGUnsworth1

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Oct 18, 2003
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If you're wondering, as I did, why Paul was deported to Haiti......According to his writ of habeus corpus (sorry, can't post it), as part of plea deal in a separate case in state court his lawyer at the time told the court he was a Haitian citizen . The article omitted that. Also, he did not appeal his 2004 deportation order, although he attempted to "challenge" it in 2005 because the window for appeal had closed. The article omitted that too. Paul's current appeal is largely based on claims of "ineffective counsel" as well as violations of his 5th and 6th amendment rights. These are pretty much boilerplate appeal grounds. I'm guessing his drug conviction won't do him any favors.
Drugs...Just say NO!
 

FGUnsworth1

Active member
Oct 18, 2003
153
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Don't know about this particular case - but do have a Dominican friend who served 10 years in the US prison system for selling crack - and AFTER that was deported to the DR ( clean and sober now for 25 years and runs the English NA group in the capital)

No one - or at least I can perhaps assume that no one on this board - has any sympathy for any Haitian (or anyone) who is deported from the USA after being convicted of a felony.

And now since the new immigration allowance there is a route for all the middle class Haitians who are trying to escape to form an orderly line and come in legally - there will be an INSTANT deportation of all #Haltians arriving at either the Southern border with Mexico or off shore in Florida. (and all those who make that trip are easily considered middle class in Haiti since it is very $$ to get across one way or another)

I don't know anyone who supports illegal immigration.
Not one tear.
 

chico bill

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May 6, 2016
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Immigrating and having illegal status you should revive swift deportation for felonies.
It's a privelege as he realizes now the opportunity he blew.
Sorry because it sounds like he had potential but he needs to look for a place somewhere he did not willing commit crimes and that will accept him.
Why would a 'financial advisor' be selling a ghetto addictive drug?
Maybe he just calls himself that.
Like I must be a sexual advisor. Because people tell me every time they want my f*king advice they'll ask for it.
 

mountainannie

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Do you?

I'm starting to get the impression you've never been beaten, robbed, raped, car jacked, pistol whipped or shot by a felon before have you?
Fortunately not any of those ... I did get shot at and have death threats against me in the DR - but because of my work - nothing personal. Finally had to ask for protection from the British Embassy.

No - I have no sympathy for illegals who are deported after felonies.. I don't actually have "much" sympathy for illegals at all. I do think that our immigration system needs a HUGE overhaul and that we ought to allow in more immigrants from the Northern Triangle countries than from countries on the other side of the pond - since - well - Our Back Yard - and all sorts of political stuff about the US that is not for this board.
 
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CristoRey

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Fortunately not any of those ... I did get shot at and have death threats against me in the DR - but because of my work - nothing personal. Finally had to ask for protection from the British Embassy.

No - I have no sympathy for illegals who are deported after felonies.. I don't actually have "much" sympathy for illegals at all. I do think that our immigration system needs a HUGE overhaul and that we ought to allow in more immigrants from the Northern Triangle countries than from countries on the other side of the pond - since - well - Our Back Yard - and all sorts of political stuff about the US that is not for this board.
Interesting.
I have a few questionsand I would really like you answer for us.

1. Can you give us a rough estimate/ ballpark number of how many you believe we should allow into the country?

2. Should these immigrants from the northern triangle be made to wait until they go thru the proper channels to be admitted into the country or should they be allowed to cross into the country illegally and be given the exact same treatment as those who entered legally?

3. What type of work are you doing down here that almost got you shot?
 

mountainannie

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Interesting.
I have a few questionsand I would really like you answer for us.

1. Can you give us a rough estimate/ ballpark number of how many you believe we should allow into the country?

2. Should these immigrants from the northern triangle be made to wait until they go thru the proper channels to be admitted into the country or should they be allowed to cross into the country illegally and be given the exact same treatment as those who entered legally?

3. What type of work are you doing down here that almost got you shot?
Note that one and two are off topic for this forum so let's not continue

1. the new Biden plan is 30,000 a month from the 4 countries (Cuba, Nicaragua, Haiti, Venezuela) - since our unemployment is so low - there are Help Wanted Signs Everywhere.... I don't have a MacroEconomic view of the country but know that most of our agriculture needs workers so I would have to say that it is really "above my pay grade"
2. The issues at the Southern Border - the back log- is caused by the refusal of Congress to upgrade the judiciary and personnel needed to process the people - there is something like a 5 year wait for processing.. (and most do show up for their hearings) The issue has become a political football
3. Journalism -https://www.ipsnews.net/2011/03/media-dominican-republic-a-bad-case-of-quid-pro-quo/
 
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mountainannie

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Note that one and two are off topic for this forum so let's not continue

1. the new Biden plan is 30,000 a month from the 4 countries (Cuba, Nicaragua, Haiti, Venezuela) - since our unemployment is so low - there are Help Wanted Signs Everywhere.... I don't have a MacroEconomic view of the country but know that most of our agriculture needs workers so I would have to say that it is really "above my pay grade"
2. The issues at the Southern Border - the back log- is caused by the refusal of Congress to upgrade the judiciary and personnel needed to process the people - there is something like a 5 year wait for processing.. (and most do show up for their hearings) The issue has become a political football
3. Journalism -https://www.ipsnews.net/2011/03/media-dominican-republic-a-bad-case-of-quid-pro-quo/
IPS is on online service covering the global south. It has a stupendous translation service. My articles were translated into 5 languages. At the time I was there, I was the only accredited journalist English journalist. This article was translated into Spanish and appeared on the front page of Diario Libre https://www.ipsnews.net/2007/07/haiti-dominican-republic-a-fragile-coexistence/ I also kept a blog - http://elizabetheames.blogspot.com
 

windeguy

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Don't know about this particular case - but do have a Dominican friend who served 10 years in the US prison system for selling crack - and AFTER that was deported to the DR ( clean and sober now for 25 years and runs the English NA group in the capital)

No one - or at least I can perhaps assume that no one on this board - has any sympathy for any Haitian (or anyone) who is deported from the USA after being convicted of a felony.

And now since the new immigration allowance there is a route for all the middle class Haitians who are trying to escape to form an orderly line and come in legally - there will be an INSTANT deportation of all #Haltians arriving at either the Southern border with Mexico or off shore in Florida. (and all those who make that trip are easily considered middle class in Haiti since it is very $$ to get across one way or another)

I don't know anyone who supports illegal immigration.
There are plenty of people supporting illegal immigration both in the DR and in my home country.
 

mountainannie

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There are plenty of people supporting illegal immigration both in the DR and in my home country.
Yes - I am sure there are. There are folks here in the US who have the slogan "no one is illegal" but I can't honestly figure out how one can have a nation without enforcing some sort of border. But then I can't figure out how a nation as rich as the USA is supposed to be can tolerate so many homeless people living on the streets of its cities. Phoenix is evidently now overrun... I suppose it is our single family house zoning and closing mental hospitals and lack of unions and war veterans and NIMBYs and all that... Immigrants are not usually the ones sleeping on our streets. (I know this was an off topic, Mods - feel free to delete)