LA FISCAL ( D.A ) vs COPS ( policia )

Facepalm Supreme

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Dec 29, 2022
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Also, I'd like to add to the voices - for a very long time now law and order has become basically a joke the world over. Abuses, unprofessional behavior, corruption, failure to adhere to or uphold values that bring order peace and justice to the common people of the nation.

Nothing spells that out more clearly than a "Magistrate", "Prosecutor" "Judge" or whatever you want to call them stepping out of a car being a young female in heels and "fashionably ripped" jeans. Sure plenty of people will disagree and this post may even be censored here but this is a job for a person with old eyes. Someone who has lived and seen life play itself out. Someone who has experience, and by experience I mean decades upon decades of learning human behavior and seeing how different situations go down in order to be able to properly determine what is what and how to resolve grievances.

It is not a job for a young hatchling. The fact that there are so many younger people involved in the "justice system" of any area is troubling. Just as troubling as 13-17 year old electricians or plumbers. It's not something you can just "do" fresh out of school with a certificate.
 

El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
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This is correct. Unfortunately this country has an overwhelming number of folks in roles they are under qualified for experience wise. You see this with Judges, docs and here's a great example. I was seeking some child counselling for my kid. The "psychologist" turned out to be 27. I was like can I see your CV please. She declined 😂. You can get a 4 year degree here and bamm! You're a licensed shrink. Anyone with a face can go to med school. A 35 year old Judge?? You have to be kidding me.

Young folks: emotions tend to get in the way of them doing a proper job also
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
Jan 7, 2016
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Also, I'd like to add to the voices - for a very long time now law and order has become basically a joke the world over. Abuses, unprofessional behavior, corruption, failure to adhere to or uphold values that bring order peace and justice to the common people of the nation.

Nothing spells that out more clearly than a "Magistrate", "Prosecutor" "Judge" or whatever you want to call them stepping out of a car being a young female in heels and "fashionably ripped" jeans. Sure plenty of people will disagree and this post may even be censored here but this is a job for a person with old eyes. Someone who has lived and seen life play itself out. Someone who has experience, and by experience I mean decades upon decades of learning human behavior and seeing how different situations go down in order to be able to properly determine what is what and how to resolve grievances.

It is not a job for a young hatchling. The fact that there are so many younger people involved in the "justice system" of any area is troubling. Just as troubling as 13-17 year old electricians or plumbers. It's not something you can just "do" fresh out of school with a certificate.
I've got news for you, have you seen any of the judges here? There is a lot of them in their 30's.
 

keepcoming

Moderator - Living & General Stuff
May 25, 2011
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Not so much how they dress, it is more how they act. "Old eyes"... no this is a job for someone fresh, new outlook, Now, I am not saying that this 'Fiscal" is the right person/wrong person. But "old rank" is not necessarily the right one. So keep looking at things with "old eyes"? How is this progress? While I do not agree with the behavior, I do not think that the so-called experience one has is the solution.
 
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El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
4,216
2,756
113
Dominican Republic
Not so much how they dress, it is more how they act. "Old eyes"... no this is a job for someone fresh, new outlook, Now, I am not saying that this 'Fiscal" is the right person/wrong person. But "old rank" is not necessarily the right one. So keep looking at things with "old eyes"? How is this progress? While I do not agree with the behavior, I do not think that the so-called experience one has is the solution.
Experience, emotional IQ, keenness of eye, a strong disposition of discernment... These are the qualifications
 

Facepalm Supreme

Active member
Dec 29, 2022
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Santo Domingo
Not so much how they dress, it is more how they act. "Old eyes"... no this is a job for someone fresh, new outlook, Now, I am not saying that this 'Fiscal" is the right person/wrong person. But "old rank" is not necessarily the right one. So keep looking at things with "old eyes"? How is this progress? While I do not agree with the behavior, I do not think that the so-called experience one has is the solution.
How you dress tells a lot about a person. Sobriety, simple/plainness, even to the extent of being boring and somber (minus the sadness) are the traits one looks for in a qualified candidate for politician, lawman, religious scholar, etc.

You are not alone in your way of thinking, hence the army of young, hot to trot fashionistas that inundate the dominican professional world. No wonder its often thought of / considered as decidedly...well unprofessional, and lacking in quality.

And thats pretty clear across the board. Professional services, legal services, trades, retail, government, down to how the average citizen navigates on the public roadways. How do any of these stack up against American or Canadian or British cultural values and professional / basic societal culture?
 
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Ecoman1949

Born to Ride.
Oct 17, 2015
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How you dress tells a lot about a person. Sobriety, simple/plainness, even to the extent of being boring and somber (minus the sadness) are the traits one looks for in a qualified candidate for politician, lawman, religious scholar, etc.

You are not alone in your way of thinking, hence the army of young, hot to trot fashionistas that inundate the dominican professional world. No wonder its often thought of / considered as decidedly...well unprofessional, and lacking in quality.

And thats pretty clear across the board. Professional services, legal services, trades, retail, government, down to how the average citizen navigates on the public roadways. How do any of these stack up against American or Canadian or British cultural values and professional / basic societal culture?
The question you pose at the end of your post is interesting. Some would say it’s unfair to compare DR cultural and societal values to North American/UK values, but spending extended periods of time in the DR forces expats and snowbirds to make comparisons. Posters on this forum, including me, have been doing comparisons since Robert set up this forum.

I had no problem coping with and adapting to many of the short comings of daily DR life during the 16 winters I spent there. I didn’t go there wishing there was a Walmart and Starbucks on every street corner. I went there to enjoy the climate and culture and was lucky enough to be introduced to and accepted by a few Dominican families thanks to my expat friends. They enriched my life.

Ultimately it was the lack of law and order that changed my mind about spending anymore long term stays in the DR. A consistent, fair, rule of law in the DR simply doesn’t exist. Especially for gringos and the reasons are obvious, corrupted officials at all levels , lack of education, training, and adequate pay for law enforcement officers, and no political will to change the status quo. The latest clash between the police and the AOP is just one more glaring symptom of a much bigger problem.

The ability to live safely in a country where I‘m guaranteed due process, where I wont be illegally arrested and incarcerated for up to a year with no legal recourse, and then pressured to bribe my way out of jail by corrupt officials, is important to me. Something I value very highly. One of the values of a civilized society sadly lacking in the DR.

Kudos to the expats who made the commitment to invest in property, live there full time, and weather the storms. Good luck coping with the increasing daily aggravations, droughts, extended periods of intense heat, intermittent power supply, unreliable water supply, dangerous traffic conditions, and the incompetent government.

There may be worse places to live but there are definitely better places to live.