97% of Haitians Regularized Didn't Qualify for Such

NALs

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An article in yesterday's Listin Diario says how of the 288,467 people that registere in the regularization plan ordered by the sentence 168-13 and later by the law 169-14, a whopping 260,241 had their illegal immigration status regularized as legal immigrants (legal residents.) Of those regularized by the Dominican government, 97% didn't qualify for such. In essence, the government of Danilo Medina was regularizing Haitians that were not able to supply the necessary documents proving things such as strong ties to Dominican society, length of time they had been living in the DR, etc. Only 7,834 people actually qualified to be regularized.

It's believed that the reason the Danilo Medina government decided to regularize so many Haitians that didn't qualify was due to domestic and international pressure (NGOs, etc.)

In addition, the requirement after receiving the regularization was to register with the Ministerio de Interior y Policía, which none did. It also states that if after 6 months from the day of regularization the beneficiary don't register with the Ministerio de Interior y Policía, it will automatically void the regularization. Basically, without that final step the person remains as an illegal immigrant.

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I remember when here on DR1 some members were criticizing Danilo Medina and his government supposedly for being anti-Haitian. In response to that I commented that among Dominicans the criticism was the opposite, that Danilo Medina et al are pro-Haitians. In fact, his name was often mocked as Danile Medine, referring to a very common tendency among Haitian creole speakers to incorrectly say some words in Spanish, many times appearing they add sn extra 'e' at the end.

Would an anti-Haitian resort to regularizing hundreds of thousands of Haitians that didn't comply with one of the most basic requirements such as show strong ties to Dominican society? :unsure:
 

cavok

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Strong ties? During that program, Danilo was even regularizing Haitians that had zero documents to even prove who they were. However, during that time, liberal NGO's and several other countries were pushing very hard for the unification of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. We had several very liberal, woke posters back then that took every opportunity to scream racist a Danilo and his handling of the program. These people always throw a temper tantrum when things don't go the way they think they should. He was anything but. He really bent over backwards to get Haitians into the program but Haiti deliberately threw a monkey wrench into the program by deliberately not giving various required documents to many Haitians so they could prove who they actually were.
 

drstock

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This is not how I remember the Regularizacion going. I knew several Haitians who spent a lot of time and money getting all the documentation together to complete the process. Some were successful and some weren't - it seemed to be a matter of chance. I don't know any Haitian who was "Regularized" without the correct documentation.

There may, of course, be some who got through by knowing the right people and paying, but I don't know of any.
 
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cavok

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This is not how I remember the Regularizacion going. I knew several Haitians who spent a lot of time and money getting all the documentation together to complete the process. Some were successful and some weren't - it seemed to be a matter of chance. I don't know any Haitian who was "Regularized" without the correct documentation.

There may, of course, be some who got through by knowing the right people and paying, but I don't know of any.
Remember, there's a big difference between "regularized" and obtaining "residency". I think that's what you're thinking(?). Danilo kept making extensions to the PNRE because so many Haitians lacked documentation like a birth certificate and a passport. Haiti deliberately stalled on providing their citizens with those documents in order to prolong and worsen the crisis. Without even an official birth certificate, many Haitians couldn't even prove who they were. Towards the end, even those w/o birth certificates were accepted into the program and given 6 months to get one. That was extended again for another 6 months. Many were not able to get their birth certificates from Haiti and were not able to complete the residency process.
 

drstock

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Remember, there's a big difference between "regularized" and obtaining "residency". I think that's what you're thinking(?). Danilo kept making extensions to the PNRE because so many Haitians lacked documentation like a birth certificate and a passport. Haiti deliberately stalled on providing their citizens with those documents in order to prolong and worsen the crisis. Without even an official birth certificate, many Haitians couldn't even prove who they were. Towards the end, even those w/o birth certificates were accepted into the program and given 6 months to get one. That was extended again for another 6 months. Many were not able to get their birth certificates from Haiti and were not able to complete the residency process.
No, I'm thinking about Regularizacion, which is the subject of this thread. One guy I know about in particular, as he was my employee, had all the right documents, including a birth certificate and passport, but was unsuccessful in obtaining it. He tells me that his friends and relations who applied also had the right documents.
 

cavok

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No, I'm thinking about Regularizacion, which is the subject of this thread. One guy I know about in particular, as he was my employee, had all the right documents, including a birth certificate and passport, but was unsuccessful in obtaining it. He tells me that his friends and relations who applied also had the right documents.
"One guy". I don't know what happened to that one guy but this was all over the news back than and discussed a lot on this forum. Many, many Haitians were 'regularized" without any papers at all towards the end of the program due to the fact that thy couldn't get the required documents from the Haitian government. After being regularized, they still had to apply for residency like anyone else. Many were unable to complete the residency process.
 

cavok

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No, I'm thinking about Regularizacion, which is the subject of this thread. One guy I know about in particular, as he was my employee, had all the right documents, including a birth certificate and passport, but was unsuccessful in obtaining it. He tells me that his friends and relations who applied also had the right documents.
Read NALs post. Over 260,000 were regularized. The overwhelming majority didn't even qualify:

 

drstock

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Read NALs post. Over 260,000 were regularized. The overwhelming majority didn't even qualify:

Of course I read NALs' post. I wouldn't be commenting if I hadn't. I am talking about my experience of what happened.
 

NALs

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This is not how I remember the Regularizacion going. I knew several Haitians who spent a lot of time and money getting all the documentation together to complete the process. Some were successful and some weren't - it seemed to be a matter of chance. I don't know any Haitian who was "Regularized" without the correct documentation.

There may, of course, be some who got through by knowing the right people and paying, but I don't know of any.
The article does says that 28,226 were not able to regularize their situation. That's a tiny amount relative to the total of those that were signed up (of those, most received regularization though 97% of them didn't qualify.)