Article on Cuban colloquial Spanish….how does Spanish in the DR compare

MariaRubia

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A few to add to the Dominican slang list from me...

Popi - meaning someone who is upmarket

Wa wa wa - meaning someone who is downmarket

Popi wa - someone who is a mix of the two

Chuippi - tacky, low quality, cheap and nasty

La Pampara - the best of the best

Chapiador/a - someone is trying to screw you over for money. The verb chapear is now pretty standard "no me chapea" - don't screw me over. This comes from those machines which chew up wood, and started being used as a term for girls who were out to get as much cash from as many guys as they could, the action of chewing them up and moving on. But now it's very standard, I hear it all the time.

Dominicans also use the English "full" a great deal. "Yo 'toy full de trabajo hoy" - I've got a lot of work on.
 

MariaRubia

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@ Lucifer

One aspect about Dominican Spanish that irks me and it comes from jerga is the spelling of words like jablador, jarto….You can’t change the spelling of words. As well as pronouncing words with a J sound like in hablar when the H in that word is silent. All those forms go against the academic standard.

A lady in my bank always says Hablar with the J, I think she thinks is makes her sound more intelligent. It took me years to work out that it should be Harta and not Jarta, I'd seen Jarta written so many times I thought it was spelt like that.
 
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Lucifer

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Yes, I know the local difference in meaning between jablador and hablador. That is why I used it as an example. I don’t think a separate spelling is required for the meaning of liar. The context of phrase should be enough to differentiate. As well, look up jablador in the RAE and you will see it’s not found. It’s a local spelling.

The Spanglish transformation would annoy me as well and thankfully, I am not around it. Language evolves. It’s not static but these invented forms of speech should not have the same weight, validity, and usage as the standard. It should never be what the majority speaks then you have a sub dialect (because in linguistics Spanish spoken in the Caribbean is a variation of standard Spanish and that’s the classification it falls under). Spanish——->Dominican Spanish——> Dominican sub-dialect. I think the norm should be Dominican Spanish with local slang.

Your example of baquiar with that meaning is 👎Those forms are only valid in that local vernacular but it has its sociolect meaning not all Dominicans speak that way and those who do surely one can find a commonality. How much you want bet me if you give those same sub-dialect Spanglish invention speakers an excerpt from the newspaper or book they will struggle to read and understand it.

Knowing the local language is inevitable if one lives in xxxx country. It’s a matter of survival. However, I always think you need to be strong in the standard form of speech since it’s universal, you need it to get a job, etc. those forms of speech don’t work any formal circle that’s for sure.
The RAE picks and chooses, depending on the so-called language zeitgeist. Why accept parqueo when there's a formal word?

But I concur wholeheartedly: while it's a matter of survival, one should learn to communicate in the standard and formal manner.

I couldn't hear Juan Luis Guerra or Leonel Fernández approach an acquaintance with <<Dime a ver, manín, ¿ké lo ké? Dame luz. Dímelo cantando>>.
 

Marianopolita

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My little "angel" who is 11 has started picking me up on my pronunciation. She was out shopping with me at the weekend and decided to correct me in a store when I was asking when the offer expired.

" Es OfeRta con R, no es OfeLta con L. Con L es muy muy barrial. "

Sometimes you just want to slap them.

The only thing I can say to that is did you say ofeLta?……because my thought is foreigners should not be repeating those forms no matter how many times you hear it or if it’s part of the speech pattern of many around you.


Kudos to la nenita que te dijo eso no se dice 🙌
 

Marianopolita

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A few to add to the Dominican slang list from me...

Popi - meaning someone who is upmarket

Wa wa wa - meaning someone who is downmarket

Popi wa - someone who is a mix of the two

Chuippi - tacky, low quality, cheap and nasty

La Pampara - the best of the best

Chapiador/a - someone is trying to screw you over for money. The verb chapear is now pretty standard "no me chapea" - don't screw me over. This comes from those machines which chew up wood, and started being used as a term for girls who were out to get as much cash from as many guys as they could, the action of chewing them up and moving on. But now it's very standard, I hear it all the time.

Dominicans also use the English "full" a great deal. "Yo 'toy full de trabajo hoy" - I've got a lot of work on.

You know when slang sounds weird….those sound weird to me except chapiadora which is common like you said.


🛑 Careful if you are going say ‘don’t screw me over’ which is a command (un mandato) that would be no me chapees or no chapee….what you wrote No me chapeas….is just a declarative phrase.
 

Marianopolita

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A lady in my bank always says Hablar with the J, I think she thinks is makes her sound more intelligent. It took me years to work out that it should be Harta and not Jarta, I'd seen Jarta written so many times I thought it was spelt like that.

The aspirared H sounds is common in Caribbean Spanish but typical in speech where the S is dropped and the word following begins with a vowel. For e.g. los amigos is often pronounced lo jamigo….and it is to compensate for the dropping of the S.

However, like you said the lady probably thought she sounds more intelligent or is pronouncing it correctly. That is similar to when you hear those who add S to where it does not belong to sound fino. They have no clue about the language which something that is scary if you ask me. Just think of all the blunders by Dominican speakers…..se vas (se va) and bosca (boca) are my classic examples.
 

Marianopolita

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The RAE picks and chooses, depending on the so-called language zeitgeist. Why accept parqueo when there's a formal word?

But I concur wholeheartedly: while it's a matter of survival, one should learn to communicate in the standard and formal manner.

I couldn't hear Juan Luis Guerra or Leonel Fernández approach an acquaintance with <<Dime a ver, manín, ¿ké lo ké? Dame luz. Dímelo cantando>>.

The RAE takes a minimum of seven years to approve a word and it has to consult with its sister academies in Latin America. It’s a long process. Who knows jablador could still be under review.

I agree Juan Luis and L Fernández will not be addressing anyone in that colloquial slang. As we say in language- it has its time and place.
 
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MariaRubia

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However, like you said the lady probably thought she sounds more intelligent or is pronouncing it correctly. That is similar to when you hear those who add S to where it does not belong to sound fino. They have no clue about the language which something that is scary if you ask me. Just think of all the blunders by Dominican speakers…..se vas (se va) and bosca (boca) are my classic examples.

Ah yes I used to have a driver who added extra s's all over the place as he thought it made him sound upmarket.
 
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MariaRubia

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The only thing I can say to that is did you say ofeLta?……because my thought is foreigners should not be repeating those forms no matter how many times you hear it or if it’s part of the speech pattern of many around you.


Kudos to la nenita que te dijo eso no se dice 🙌

The problem is that I never learnt Spanish formally. I was married to a Cuban and then I came here, and I was fluent in French previously. So I just picked it up by using the language. I don't know hardly anyone who speaks English here, so I speak Spanish all day and I'm told that I'm fluent. I've never done the th th th that the Spanish do, and I've grown up listening to the Caribbean accent. And I must admit that I do say VeLda instead of VeRdad and I so slide into a very soft L at the end of AmoL rather than Amor, mainly because that's what I hear all the time. I do make an effort to say the S at the end of GraciaS, even though most people I know say Gracia.

Obviously now that my princess - who goes to a top school that costs me a fortune - has decided that we must all speak correctly then I shall have to be more focused on my R's.
 
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NALs

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Changing the R's for the L's is more of a Santo Domingo habit. Unlike in Puerto Rico where it's all over the island, in the DR you go to anywhere in the Cibao speaking like that and everyone will associate it with capitaleños. Either you were born and raised in the Capital or you've lived for many years in that city. Don't go to Santiago and ask for a china.

One time Mustafa Abu Naba was interviewed while in Panama City by a Panamanian journalist and he was answering the questions she asked him all in Spanish. Good enough, but then he said chin. Ok, so he is originally from Palestine (or is it Jordan?) and lived in the USA for many years prior to living in the DR. For a man that is a billionaire and travels a lot including to many countries in Latin America on a yearly basis, the fact he had not picked up that essentially outside the DR no one knows what chin is was mind-blowing. May God stop him in time if he go to most places in Latin America and refers to a mata. Most native Spanish speakers are left in the air if you speak to them and blurtout these and/or similar words.
 

aarhus

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The problem is that I never learnt Spanish formally. I was married to a Cuban and then I came here, and I was fluent in French previously. So I just picked it up by using the language. I don't know hardly anyone who speaks English here, so I speak Spanish all day and I'm told that I'm fluent. I've never done the th th th that the Spanish do, and I've grown up listening to the Caribbean accent. And I must admit that I do say VeLda instead of VeRdad and I so slide into a very soft L at the end of AmoL rather than Amor, mainly because that's what I hear all the time. I do make an effort to say the S at the end of GraciaS, even though most people I know say Gracia.

Obviously now that my princess - who goes to a top school that costs me a fortune - has decided that we must all speak correctly then I shall have to be more focused on my R's.
I did take Spanish courses. First time in my mid twenties in Copenhagen and the teacher was Cuban and we then dated for over a year. Then afterwards I started traveling to Cuba and then came to the DR. I also normally say I am “fluent”in Spanish but it’s not correct Spanish. A lot of it I learned here. Pronunciation is the hardest for me. I learned English and German easily but not Spanish.
 
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Marianopolita

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The problem is that I never learnt Spanish formally. I was married to a Cuban and then I came here, and I was fluent in French previously. So I just picked it up by using the language. I don't know hardly anyone who speaks English here, so I speak Spanish all day and I'm told that I'm fluent. I've never done the th th th that the Spanish do, and I've grown up listening to the Caribbean accent. And I must admit that I do say VeLda instead of VeRdad and I so slide into a very soft L at the end of AmoL rather than Amor, mainly because that's what I hear all the time. I do make an effort to say the S at the end of GraciaS, even though most people I know say Gracia.

Obviously now that my princess - who goes to a top school that costs me a fortune - has decided that we must all speak correctly then I shall have to be more focused on my R's.

As an adult learning Spanish or any language just by listening and interacting with other speakers IMO is hard. You will certainly learn many aspects of the language but the gaps and grammatical mistakes are noticeable. As well, you have to do a lot of guessing both when listening to people and when you speak.

How you choose to speak is your choice but everything you mentioned so far is covered by grammatical studies or knowledge. I am just saying.

Team La nenita 🙌
 
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Marianopolita

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Here is an interesting sociolinguistic concept I noticed in some replies on Instagram that I am going to research.

I have seen me guRta instead of me gusta consistently and from Cuban posters 🇨🇺. This is an S to R change 🤔

My first thought was rural guajiro speech as in campesino but I am going to research it and post in this thread if I find anything.
 
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AlterEgo

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Yea, food is something I find easy because I love to eat. My pronunciation is probably skewed but I do know the words.

Just for you Nan. I disagree with the soda, DR uses refresco IMO.

0C24980B-312E-41D1-9245-F15478DB0856.jpeg
 

NALs

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Cerdo is also referred to as puerco.

Most people call patatas papas, in fact no one calls it patatas.

Pasta will often be called espagueti.

Postre more often is simply dulce.

Naranja is called that everywhere but in Santo Domingo many people call it china like in all of Puerto Rico.

Frijoles are more often referred to as guandules or habichuelas.

Soda soda is refresco because if you ask for a soda there is a high possibility they will bring baking soda.

Almuerzo is often called simply as la comida.
 

Marianopolita

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Just for you Nan. I disagree with the soda, DR uses refresco IMO.

View attachment 7094

I understood Nan’s response as being he knows how to say foods in the DR the way they are said on the island and not in a general way like in the list you posted 🤷‍♀️

As well, in Spanish refresco is the most common BUT in Colombia and other South American countries it’s gaseosa….around Colombians I always ask for a gaseosa…..as the saying goes ‘when in Rome do what the Romans do’.
 

malko

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In colmados, around my parts,

A refresco would be a coca cola, a sprite or whatnot.
Whereas a soda would be fizzy water, short for soda amarga ( sp?).
 

malko

Campesino !! :)
Jan 12, 2013
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In colmados, around my parts,

A refresco would be a coca cola, a sprite or whatnot.
Whereas a soda would be fizzy water, short for soda amarga ( sp?).

Of course, if you actually said refre-s-co you are liable to be stabbed ( just kidding 😁😁).
You have to say refreco to belong 🤗🤗🤗