Availability of Insulation and Pressure Treated Wood

Martin99

New member
Jul 11, 2014
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Greetings!

We will be building a small office inside an existing warehouse-type structure, and plan to use sheetrock instead of the typical concrete block partitions. I've read through the thread on Sheetrock availability in the DR from spring of this year, and that was quite helpful. Wasn't sure if I should just add to that thread or start a new one, so here we are.

We're around the Barahona area, in the Southwest of the country. As such, I think there's a few things readily available in other areas that haven't made their way down here. We want to follow the standard practice of using pressure treated wood for the pieces attached to the concrete floor and walls. However, when we checked today at the big lumber yard in town and one (of the 100 or so) ferreteria, they seemed to not know what PT wood is.

Secondly, we plan to put A/C in the office, so we want to add insulation in the walls and ceiling. At the ferreteria, the guy showed us a roll of fiberglass cloth-like material, but didn't know what else we were talking about. Our manager, a Dominican, said he is aware of something called 'hielo seco' (also the words for dry ice, oddly enough) that he thinks is used for insulation here. He showed me photos of it, and it looks like blocks of styrofoam.

I have to believe both of these items are available, just need to find out where. I'd be grateful for any information you guys have on the availability of these items, location, and possibly contact info of the suppliers (since we'll likely have to travel to buy it). If anyone has familiarity with what may be available in San Juan, Azua, and Bani, those would be the easiest locations for us. Otherwise, we can certainly make the pilgrimage to Santo Domingo, if that's what is needed.

Thanks!
 

melphis

Living my Dream
Apr 18, 2013
3,515
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I think you might be making the pilgrimage to STQ. I have seen Fiberglass pink in Americana a few months ago. That has no bearing if they still have it. Most lumber yards have pressure treated wood.
Good luck with your hunt and project.
 

jimbobo

Member
Feb 9, 2014
170
4
18
Greetings!

We will be building a small office inside an existing warehouse-type structure, and plan to use sheetrock instead of the typical concrete block partitions. I've read through the thread on Sheetrock availability in the DR from spring of this year, and that was quite helpful. Wasn't sure if I should just add to that thread or start a new one, so here we are.

We're around the Barahona area, in the Southwest of the country. As such, I think there's a few things readily available in other areas that haven't made their way down here. We want to follow the standard practice of using pressure treated wood for the pieces attached to the concrete floor and walls. However, when we checked today at the big lumber yard in town and one (of the 100 or so) ferreteria, they seemed to not know what PT wood is.

Secondly, we plan to put A/C in the office, so we want to add insulation in the walls and ceiling. At the ferreteria, the guy showed us a roll of fiberglass cloth-like material, but didn't know what else we were talking about. Our manager, a Dominican, said he is aware of something called 'hielo seco' (also the words for dry ice, oddly enough) that he thinks is used for insulation here. He showed me photos of it, and it looks like blocks of styrofoam.

I have to believe both of these items are available, just need to find out where. I'd be grateful for any information you guys have on the availability of these items, location, and possibly contact info of the suppliers (since we'll likely have to travel to buy it). If anyone has familiarity with what may be available in San Juan, Azua, and Bani, those would be the easiest locations for us. Otherwise, we can certainly make the pilgrimage to Santo Domingo, if that's what is needed.

Thanks!

You can buy styrofoam in ferretería ochoa . They call it "aislante para concreto" . It's best to seal the joints with PU foam
 

Martin99

New member
Jul 11, 2014
24
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0
I think you might be making the pilgrimage to STQ. I have seen Fiberglass pink in Americana a few months ago. That has no bearing if they still have it. Most lumber yards have pressure treated wood.
Good luck with your hunt and project.

Thanks, melphis!
 

Martin99

New member
Jul 11, 2014
24
0
0
You can buy styrofoam in ferretería ochoa . They call it "aislante para concreto" . It's best to seal the joints with PU foam

Thanks for the reply, jimbobo. This is probably exactly what my manager was referring to as "hielo seco." Can you give more detail on your comment that "It's best to seal the joints with PU foam"?

Also, do you (or another reader) have an opinion on whether the foam or fiberglass is preferred (performs better, more cost-effective, etc.) here?

Lastly, you mentioned Ochoa, and melphis mentioned Americana, both of which I've seen referred to in other threads. Are these standalone ferreterias, or are they 'chains'? [EDIT: I just found the website for Americana. Looks like the country's version of Home Depot!]

Grateful for the info!
 
Last edited:

jimbobo

Member
Feb 9, 2014
170
4
18
Thanks for the reply, jimbobo. This is probably exactly what my manager was referring to as "hielo seco." Can you give more detail on your comment that "It's best to seal the joints with PU foam"?

Also, do you (or another reader) have an opinion on whether the foam or fiberglass is preferred (performs better, more cost-effective, etc.) here?

Lastly, you mentioned Ochoa, and melphis mentioned Americana, both of which I've seen referred to in other threads. Are these standalone ferreterias, or are they 'chains'? [EDIT: I just found the website for Americana. Looks like the country's version of Home Depot!]

Grateful for the info!

When you insulate, you have to imagine covering the room with a blanket. If you cover the room with pieces of blanket, it is nog well insulares. Therefor you when you finished installing styrofoam, you shouls apply PU foam in the joints, because otherwise the heat or cold will slip away through the joints
 

cobraboy

Pro-Bono Demolition Hobbyist
Jul 24, 2004
40,964
936
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I looked for "pressure treated" wood some years ago. What I was told was "pressure treated" was just treated and not under pressure.

Maybe some company is importing it, but a dilligent search never found what I consider "pressure treated."

I used some of the treated wood on the floor of my motorcycle trailer. And while it has resisted insects over the last four years, it is staring to show signs of pulling apart at the grain, something true pressure treated wood would not do.
 

Martin99

New member
Jul 11, 2014
24
0
0
Thanks for all the input. Looks like we'll be taking a trip this week. Sounds like I should be able to get what I need at Ochoa and/or Americana. Or, at least, closer than what is available here!
 

jtom343

New member
Nov 8, 2017
38
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0
I have been to Barahona and it can get quite windy there during Hurricane season. Why not just pour concrete? There’s plenty of it in the country. Also, that isn’t to mention the termites that may exist where you are. Plenty where I am from in La Romana. Everyone around us started building with concrete to avoid them. Good luck with the process.




Greetings!

We will be building a small office inside an existing warehouse-type structure, and plan to use sheetrock instead of the typical concrete block partitions. I've read through the thread on Sheetrock availability in the DR from spring of this year, and that was quite helpful. Wasn't sure if I should just add to that thread or start a new one, so here we are.

We're around the Barahona area, in the Southwest of the country. As such, I think there's a few things readily available in other areas that haven't made their way down here. We want to follow the standard practice of using pressure treated wood for the pieces attached to the concrete floor and walls. However, when we checked today at the big lumber yard in town and one (of the 100 or so) ferreteria, they seemed to not know what PT wood is.

Secondly, we plan to put A/C in the office, so we want to add insulation in the walls and ceiling. At the ferreteria, the guy showed us a roll of fiberglass cloth-like material, but didn't know what else we were talking about. Our manager, a Dominican, said he is aware of something called 'hielo seco' (also the words for dry ice, oddly enough) that he thinks is used for insulation here. He showed me photos of it, and it looks like blocks of styrofoam.

I have to believe both of these items are available, just need to find out where. I'd be grateful for any information you guys have on the availability of these items, location, and possibly contact info of the suppliers (since we'll likely have to travel to buy it). If anyone has familiarity with what may be available in San Juan, Azua, and Bani, those would be the easiest locations for us. Otherwise, we can certainly make the pilgrimage to Santo Domingo, if that's what is needed.

Thanks!
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
Jan 7, 2016
12,552
8,831
113
Thanks for all the input. Looks like we'll be taking a trip this week. Sounds like I should be able to get what I need at Ochoa and/or Americana. Or, at least, closer than what is available here!


You can also get treated wood at INDOMACA. IIRC they have their own treatment setup as well. What you're looking for is called "Madera tratada"

A good source for Sheetrock is a place just west a few hundred meters after Pricesmart on Charles Sumner . Can't remember the name at the moment, but ask anyone once your in the area. Same side of the road.
 

Hillbilly

Moderator
Jan 1, 2002
18,948
514
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I realize that I am late to this party but here are some things that might help'

1. Sheetrock is called "she roh" here. 2. If you want "Womanized" / treated wood, then "madera tratado" is your term, and Ochoa is the very best for this. 3. If you want fiber board (like a lot of IKEA furniture) then that is called "madera prensada".

I have never used Insulation here so I cannot help you with that, but I'd bet a lot of money that Americana has exactly what you need.

Hope this helps you a little

Cordially,

HB