Dominican DNA- INTERESTING READ

bob saunders

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My wife's DNA with East Iberia the largest at 33.4 percent.
 
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NALs

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Thatz’s an interesting read but given how diverse is the DR from region to region, how the results will be and whether they are very representstive to most Dominicans does depends where you get the samples from. For starters, the population isn’t equally distributed in the territory. The two most populous region are the Santo Domingo Metro Area and the Cibao, particularly the valley. In the Cibao most of the population lives away from the coast.

Based on the maps they show, three places they got samples from are Santo Domingo, San Juan de la Maguana, and Las Galeras. Of the three, the only place where lives the largest percentage of Dominicans of the three places they got sample from is Santo Domingo.

The entire South region has a population of about 1.9 million and the most heavily populated part of the South is around San Cristóbal and Baní. Once you go west of Baní, the population thins out very rapidly. In fact, driving in rural areas in the South is similar to driving in rural areas in the East in the sense that often you are far from a home. Many times it’s you and the road. This is very different from the Cibao Valley, especially in the part with the highest concentration of population where you are never far from some campo. In fact, in this part of the Cibao you get the feeling that the countryside is full.

They got no samples from the East. It’s the least populated region of the country with about 1.5 million. If you’re going to get samples from one place in the South, at the very least from somewhere in the East too.

Then comes the Cibao. They got samples from one place in a peninsula where its entire population a,ount to about 1% of the entire country and populationwise isn’t very relevant for the overall Cibao region. If anything, that is the most different part of the Cibao region. Much more telling would had been getting samples from either Santiago, La Vega, San Francisco de Macorís, even Puerto Plata province has more people than the entire Samaná Peninsula.

There have been a few DNA studies I’ve seen where they essentially avoid getting samples from that part of the Cibao, despite the fact after Santo Domingo that is the most dense area in the country. The population of Santiago province alone is equivalent to most of the population of the East. That’s one province in one region vs five provinces in another region. Santiago and La Vega provinces have a combined population of almost the entire population of the South region. That’s two provinces vs ten provinces in the South.

I’m left baffled how they can make a study with results claiming to be typical for Dominicans and essentially miss getting any samples from one of the most populous parts of the country!
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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Thatz’s an interesting read but given how diverse is the DR from region to region, how the results will be and whether they are very representstive to most Dominicans does depends where you get the samples from. For starters, the population isn’t equally distributed in the territory. The two most populous region are the Santo Domingo Metro Area and the Cibao, particularly the valley. In the Cibao most of the population lives away from the coast.

Based on the maps they show, three places they got samples from are Santo Domingo, San Juan de la Maguana, and Las Galeras. Of the three, the only place where lives the largest percentage of Dominicans of the three places they got sample from is Santo Domingo.

The entire South region has a population of about 1.9 million and the most heavily populated part of the South is around San Cristóbal and Baní. Once you go west of Baní, the population thins out very rapidly. In fact, driving in rural areas in the South is similar to driving in rural areas in the East in the sense that often you are far from a home. Many times it’s you and the road. This is very different from the Cibao Valley, especially in the part with the highest concentration of population where you are never far from some campo. In fact, in this part of the Cibao you get the feeling that the countryside is full.

They got no samples from the East. It’s the least populated region of the country with about 1.5 million. If you’re going to get samples from one place in the South, at the very least from somewhere in the East too.

Then comes the Cibao. They got samples from one place in a peninsula where its entire population a,ount to about 1% of the entire country and populationwise isn’t very relevant for the overall Cibao region. If anything, that is the most different part of the Cibao region. Much more telling would had been getting samples from either Santiago, La Vega, San Francisco de Macorís, even Puerto Plata province has more people than the entire Samaná Peninsula.

There have been a few DNA studies I’ve seen where they essentially avoid getting samples from that part of the Cibao, despite the fact after Santo Domingo that is the most dense area in the country. The population of Santiago province alone is equivalent to most of the population of the East. That’s one province in one region vs five provinces in another region. Santiago and La Vega provinces have a combined population of almost the entire population of the South region. That’s two provinces vs ten provinces in the South.

I’m left baffled how they can make a study with results claiming to be typical for Dominicans and essentially miss getting any samples from one of the most populous parts of the country!
I don't disagree with you on that, but a great deal of the population of Santo Domingo has migrated there from other parts of the DR, including the Cibao. I suppose they could have gone to San Jose de la Matas...etc to get more samples. They explained their reasoning in the article.
 

NALs

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I don't disagree with you on that, but a great deal of the population of Santo Domingo has migrated there from other parts of the DR, including the Cibao. I suppose they could have gone to San Jose de la Matas...etc to get more samples. They explained their reasoning in the article.
Almost everybody in SD either migrated there or their parents or grandparents did. But especially those for whom the migrants were their parents or grandparents, they tend to not say they are from the Cibao or the South, just that their family is from there. Many are mixed between the two origins due that their parents met in SD and everything else happened there. People from the Cibao that move to SD while they are still single frequently pair up with Dominicans that aren”t from the Cibao or their family is from there.

I think to get a good representation of the Cibao population, samples will have to be taken in places like Santiago, La Vega, San Francisco. Once you go into Samaná the population there has a different origin from the typical Cibao population, particularly in the eastern part of the peninsula. Las Galeras is about as east a town exist on that peninsula. At least if it was Sánchez where it’s common to hear people speaking with the I like in the Cibao Valley it’s more understandable than Las Galeras. They don’t even play merengue típico over there and that is a hallmark of the Cibao. In SD too until recent years it was extremely hard to find anywhere that played merengue típico. It doesn’t mean one has to like merengue típico, but a person can’t live in the Cibao Valley without ever hearing it.
 

RDKNIGHT

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I don't disagree with you on that, but a great deal of the population of Santo Domingo has migrated there from other parts of the DR, including the Cibao. I suppose they could have gone to San Jose de la Matas...etc to get more samples. They explained their reasoning in the article.
Hi Bob the world is changing you don't disagree ....
 

AlterEgo

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South Coast

Ancestry breaks it down further, not just Iberia. My husband has not only Portugal and Spain, they also break out Basque separately. He has France too, I’m guessing near the Basque border.
 

bob saunders

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Ancestry breaks it down further, not just Iberia. My husband has not only Portugal and Spain, they also break out Basque separately. He has France too, I’m guessing near the Basque border.
No, she has West Iberia, East Iberia, Northern Italy, Libia, Northern Morocco, Southern Morrocco. and about 6 other regions in Africa but not following borders. Mine has specific areas, townships....etc in England, Scotland and Wales.
 

NALs

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If it’s from the same company, it could mean in her the European/African parts tend to be old. In 23andme, you get more detailed (provinces/states level, maybe even more detailed) if it’s rather recent. Whenever you see Dominicans getting very detailed maps of the areas of ancestry in Spain/Africa/elsewhere, be 100% it isn’t the part from the Conquistador’s Era or the first Africans in the New World. The one place every Dominican gets down to provincial levels is the DR and then neighboring countries/territories such as Puerto Rico, Haiti and/or Cuba. You don’t see much among Dominicans that the USA appears, much less a very detailed either.

I didn’t realized it could get detailed with the USA until I saw a few results from Americans of the types that have been in the USA since the Civil War or colonial times (the “Mayflower states” in the northeast and New England it’s common to meet people who’s so-and-so ancestor arrived in the Mayflower.)

Many Dominicans tend to have old DNA, meaning it arrived in the DR many centuries ago, beforw the DR was the DR. You read about the various historical happenings, well many times it isn’t just a story and many of them you learn about them in school already knowing about them.
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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If it’s from the same company, it could mean in her the European/African parts tend to be old. In 23andme, you get more detailed (provinces/states level, maybe even more detailed) if it’s rather recent. Whenever you see Dominicans getting very detailed maps of the areas of ancestry in Spain/Africa/elsewhere, be 100% it isn’t the part from the Conquistador’s Era or the first Africans in the New World. The one place every Dominican gets down to provincial levels is the DR and then neighboring countries/territories such as Puerto Rico, Haiti and/or Cuba. You don’t see much among Dominicans that the USA appears, much less a very detailed either.

I didn’t realized it could get detailed with the USA until I saw a few results from Americans of the types that have been in the USA since the Civil War or colonial times (the “Mayflower states” in the northeast and New England it’s common to meet people who’s so-and-so ancestor arrived in the Mayflower.)

Many Dominicans tend to have old DNA, meaning it arrived in the DR many centuries ago, beforw the DR was the DR. You read about the various historical happenings, well many times it isn’t just a story and many of them you learn about them in school already knowing about them.
Probably true for the African DNA but she knows exactly where her ancestors in Spain come from as in one case only three generations ago and it the other 4 generations. One of her sisters is currently living in the house in Almeria that her grandfather was born and raised in.
 

NALs

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Probably true for the African DNA but she knows exactly where her ancestors in Spain come from as in one case only three generations ago and it the other 4 generations. One of her sisters is currently living in the house in Almeria that her grandfather was born and raised in.
One of my cousins is around 16% Middle Eastern and he gets a detailed up close of Lebanon specifying the region within that tiny country where it can be from. In his case, that small 16% comes from one ancestor as oppose to the other origins.

In fact, he’s more than twice of Spanish descent, but it doesn’t get more detailed than the national level of Spain/Portugal.

He is more Spanish than Lebanese, but the Spanish part comes from various ancestors which were added at different times. He also has nearly 8% DR Indigenous, which essentially all of it is most likely Taino. If he has that much, which is beyond “statistical noise” meaning it’s a real input, then some of the Spanish and might as well of the African has to be from those arrived in the 1500’s. Considering almost all the SR Indigenous was already mixed with Spanish and African by the time Francis Drake invaded SD in 1586.

If his Spanish input was from one or two ancestors, I think they would find it easier to get more detailed regarding Spain.

I don’t think getting the most detailed regarding places in Africa is possible. No Dominican has African ancestry that traces back to one or two people (not counting the 0.0001% that may have a Nigerian father, etc.) Example, AZB’s son is one Dominican where Pakistan will be one of the places to pop up in these tests, but that’s not the case for 99.999% of Dominicans. Doesn’t make him any less Dominican, but there are hardly any Dominican of partial Pakistani ancestry. The typical Dominican regardless his percentage of African is very broken with African origins spanning a large swathe of what already is a large continent.