Dominican Foods

Mariot

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moro de habichuela con pollo guisado, aguacate and platanos al caldero.
my other favorite is mang? con huevo frito, queso blanco (not fried) and lots of onions.
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Today for lunch: Wasacaca roasted chicken, casabe bread(al ajillo), rice and black beans(moro) and green salad. Life is good.
 

granca

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Aug 20, 2007
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I have heard that roast aubergines are good, recipe please. We had Yuca the other day, no problems but boiled it had no flavour, suggestions please,
 

granca

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I've seen smoked meat. smoked bacon. smoked salami here but where can I find smoked fish? How else could I make kedgeree/
 

Matilda

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Sep 13, 2006
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You could make it with bacalau which is salted cod rather than smoked yellow haddock (!) but it works. You can buy it in any colmado and you need to soak it to get some of the salt out. It flakes like yellow haddock - not quite the best kedgeree in the world but it works.

Aubergines: cut up, sprinkle generously with salt and put in a sieve over a bowl for 30 mins plus. The bitter liquid will drain out. Rinse, sprinkle with olive oil, garlic, basil if you have it and roast in oven for around 45 mins. If you want to, add chunks of peppers, onions and tomatoes for a great ratatouille.

Matilda
 

Chip

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I have heard that roast aubergines are good, recipe please. We had Yuca the other day, no problems but boiled it had no flavour, suggestions please,

It is just like potato. If you don't salt it or add other condiments it has little taste.

I eat it the traditional way mostly boiled with salt added to the water. I like to eat it with Gouda cheese or a sweet smoked sausage from La Sirena has called "Maseca".

It is also very good in soup and even better than potato because it really absorbs the flavor of the soup.
 

AlterEgo

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Yuca is great in soup as Chip says. When I boil yuca I either add salt to the water or pop in a chicken cube or two. While it's boiling, I saut? some red onions in olive oil. Drain the yuca, put it in a serving bowl and pour the onion and a bit of the oil over it. Some Dominicans add vinegar to the onions, but I personally don't like vinegar.

AE
 

Matilda

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Sep 13, 2006
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Forgot to mention that you need to put a plate with a weight on it on top of the aubergines to squeeze the bitter juice out a bit. And Alter ego, how exactly do you cook yuca as mine is always stringy and horrid. Do you put it in boiling water or cold and bring it to the boil??

Matilda
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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For yucca to be good it needs to be fresh. It generally appears moist when new. It also will not have any black coloring on the inside and for that reason it is always a good idea to cut off the tip. Also, smaller pieces will help too. When yucca is really dry in the center it is usually because it is old or not cooked long enough.
 

AlterEgo

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Forgot to mention that you need to put a plate with a weight on it on top of the aubergines to squeeze the bitter juice out a bit. And Alter ego, how exactly do you cook yuca as mine is always stringy and horrid. Do you put it in boiling water or cold and bring it to the boil??

Matilda

Mat, I put it in the cold water then turn on the heat, same as when I boil potatoes. I partially cover the pot. When I buy it I always break off the tiny end of the piece, if you see ANY "veins" don't buy it. It has to be pure white. When it's fresh, it cooks quicker too. It should be almost creamy when it's cooked right - creamy in that you could mash it if you wanted to.

If you buy the yuca and find it's got veins running through it, then it's old. The only thing to do with it, IMO, is shred it and make arepita de yuca.

Yum.

AE
 

johnny

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Feb 8, 2003
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The best yucca come from Moca.
Best way to know if the yucca is good. look at the soil outside, if its very black, then is from Moca. always good and tender. cook very fast. Supermarkets are not the best places to buy yucca. buy it better from a truck that delivery daily and stop in some corners.
 

granca

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Aug 20, 2007
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Funny thread this, it doesn't tell you how to post a new question. I'll try here:
In England the front leg joint of a pig is called "a hand of pork", if its cured, salt or smoked, its called a " bacon forehock", how do you say that in Dominican spanish? Induveca S.A. sell cured ankles of bacon, and very tasty they are too, and I want to ask them if they can supply a bacon forehock.
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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berenjena by dv8:
we start from making pasta de ajo, very useful with many other dishes (we use it by buckets). peel lots and lots of garlic. place in a blender. add olive oil and start blending. you can add more oil as you go. add little salt and pepper. the paste will be kinda runny but it's ok, it gets more solid in the fridge.
now for berenjena. cut into slices about one centimeter thick. put salt, leave aside for about 30 minutes. then rinse with cold water, dry with a kitchen towel. smear each slice with garlic paste.
put grilling pan on fire, sprinkle with some olive oil. when pan is hot put on berenjena. grill for a moment, turn on the other side. put some parmesan on the side that is already grilled and finish cooking. you can sunstitute parmesan with a small slice of mozarella and a silce or wedge of tomato.
before serving sprinkle with herbs.
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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yuka:
peel. any fibery parts, parts looking very white and dry - have to be cut off. yuka should be creamy in colour, "glossy" and juicy. cut into small chunks (like fire wood, first long thick slices, then split the piece in two or four). wash after cut, do not attempt to wash off the dirt first, too much bother.
put in cold salty water, boil until soft. you have to remove hard and stringy "wire" that is right in the middle of yuka. it can easily pierce the intestines (cause of death of my friend's dog). on the side prepare onions. when you put yuka to cook slice up onions, put some salt on them and add vinegar. let it rest so you can start cooking onions after yuka is ready. simply fry the onions on a spoon of olive oil (with the juice and vinegar it was in).
pour olive oil on yuka, then onions.
best served with "comida de pobres": arenque, bacalao, huevos fritos, queso frito (not really poor people's food, to be honest, with current prices...).
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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gringo sancocho, basic version:
season the meat. can be chicken, chivo, beef, chuletas, salchichas, whatever takes your fancy, really. leave to rest when you are off to prepare veggies. potatoes, yuka, banana (green), platano (green), rulo (green), yautia, carrots, squash, celery (root), corn (whole), whatever you like. peel, cut into chunks (i like bite size chunks, dominicans usueally make the pieces bigger), wash.
put meat into a big pot. i never bother to cook meats separately, sancocho is lots of work as it is. some olive oil (i love olive oil) and off you go, fry it. when meats gets some colour pour in water. cook.
give meat some time, it should be well cooked. add veggies. now, i sometimes cook vegetables separately from meat but i do not have a pot big enough to hold all the soup. you will see that even one piece of each kind of meat and one of each veggies will make LOTS of sancocho :)
in any case, let everything cook. now peel, clean and cut ayuama. can be bigger chunks, it cooks quickly anyways. throw auyama into the soup. add few pieces of garlic, a cut up onion or two, green celery (bush), parsley and coriander (if you are crazy :) ). when auyama gets softer fish it out along with herbs, onion, garlic, some carrots and quite some liquid. do not despair if you cannot find all auyama/onion :) you are not in a competition.
blend whatever you fished out, add to the soup. it should be now thick and creamy. add salt, pepper, herbs, whatever.
since i hate rice and never ever eat it i serve my sancocho with aguacate only. there is enough veggies in it to make it a nice full meal.
ps, i normally do not eat meat but i make few exceptions. i will eat sancocho - liquid and vegetables - but not meat pieces. yes, i know, it is soaked in meat anyways.
 

granca

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Aug 20, 2007
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Brine tub.Has anyone had any experience of making and using a brinetub here in the RD? There is all manner of smoked meat here, no fish mind you, but I would love some salt beef.
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
Today on the menu:

Pastelon de berejena - Eggplant Pastelon
Arroz blanco - White rice
Maiz sancochado - corn on the cob
Ensalda verde - green salad

Life is good :)