Ebola and the Dominican Republic

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donP

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The Camel Shop

PG-13: I can sell you the tape if you want to know more about the intimate life of Monkeys and Camels :laugh:

Due to the lack of camels in Saman? the demand for that tape may be disappointing. :disappoin
However, if you can bring a few camels... :bunny:

donP
 

AnnaC

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Not sure if this has been covered but since the virus isn't air borne would it be enough when sitting on an airplane to use hand sanitizer?
 

donP

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Best Solution Ever

Not sure if this has been covered but since the virus isn't air borne would it be enough when sitting on an airplane to use hand sanitizer?

Great idea! :bunny:
Sometimes simple solutions are best....

donP
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
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Not sure if this has been covered but since the virus isn't air borne would it be enough when sitting on an airplane to use hand sanitizer?

"If you bring two doctors who happen to have that specialty (Ebola) into a room, one will say, 'No, it will never become airborne, but it could mutate so it would be harder to discover.' Another doctor will say, 'If it continues to mutate at the rate it's mutating, and we go from 20,000 infected to 100,000, the population might allow it to mutate and become airborne, and then it will be a serious problem.' I don't know who is right." -- Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told CNN.


What's more disturbing than Ebola? The commentary - CNN.com
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
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New York City firefighters BANNED from saying 'Ebola' on the radio to avoid creating widespread panic

  • Firefighters in New York forbidden from using the word 'Ebola' on the radio
  • Instead, they must use the code letters 'F/T', as in Fever/Travel
  • The ban is meant to prevent panic in case Ebola turns up in NYC
  • Emergency radio channels are monitored by civilians and media
  • Ebola has killed one man and infected two nurses in Dallas





Read more: FDNY BANNED from saying 'Ebola' on the radio to avoid creating widespread panic | Daily Mail Online
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
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Ebola Scare Turns Dallas Hospital Into a 'Ghost Town


The Dallas nurses who contracted Ebola while treating a patient at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital have been moved from the building, but patients are still steering clear of the once-bustling hospital.

People have called to cancel outpatient procedures, and some have even opted not to go to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in emergency situations, ABC Dallas affiliate WFAA reports.

"It feels like a ghost town," Rachelle Cohorn, a local health care vendor who has been to the hospital recently, told WFAA. "No one is even walking around the hospital."

Texas Health Presbyterian's average emergency room wait time had been 52 minutes, according to federal hospital data. But when ABC News called the hospital and asked the emergency department for the ER wait time today, the response was that there was no wait time.

Ebola Scare Turns Dallas Hospital Into a 'Ghost Town' - ABC News
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
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To put the whole Ebola problem in perspective, look at this slide show from CNN:

Deadly diseases: epidemics throughout history


"The current Ebola outbreak is the largest of its kind on record. See how this epidemic compares with others throughout history."

The current epidemic in West Africa is the largest Ebola outbreak on record. In less than a year, the virus has killed more than 4,000 people. The CDC has said that in a worst-case scenario the disease could infect as many as 1.4 million people by January. If the current death rate holds steady around 70%, that could mean up to 980,000 by next year.


430 b.c.

Smallpox is caused by the variola virus, which spreads through skin-to-skin contact or contact with bodily fluids. It can also be spread through the air. In 430 B.C., smallpox killed more than 30,000 people in Athens, Greece, reducing the city’s population by at least 20%.

541 a.d.

The Plague of Justinian, which began in 541 and continued on and off for nearly 200 years, killed 50 million people in the Middle East, Asia and the Mediterranean basin, according to some estimates. The plague is caused by bacteria that are spread by rats that were bitten by infected fleas.


1334

What's known as the Great Plague of London actually started in China in 1334 and spread along trade routes, wiping out entire towns. Florence, Italy, lost a third of its 90,000 residents in the first six months. Overall, Europe lost 25 million people.


1519

There were approximately 25 million people living in what is now called Mexico when Hernando Cortes arrived in 1519. A smallpox epidemic killed between 5 and 8 million of the native population in the following two years. Over the next century, less than 2 million would survive this and other communicable diseases brought by European explorers.

1633

Smallpox reached Massachusetts in 1633, brought by settlers from France, Great Britain and the Netherlands. It quickly spread to the Native American population, which had up until now been free of this communicable disease. It’s unclear how many were killed by smallpox, though historians estimate some 20 million may have died after the Europeans landed.

1793

Philadelphia was struck with a yellow fever epidemic in 1793 that killed a 10th of the city's 45,000-person population.

1860

The Modern Plague began in the 1860s and killed more than 12 million people in China, India and Hong Kong. It wasn’t until the 1890s that people figured out how the bacterial infection was being spread and a vaccine was created.

Etc....


You really think this is just another little thing for all of us???

Think again!

Once Ebola hits important financial centers around the world, their economies will collapse.
It's the tiny islands and midget nations that will offer the best odds of isolation from infection/outbreaks.

You know, when enough people are stricken with Ebola, no jobs, no food, no care, not shelter for their peace, things will get nasty in those areas. It will be a two sided story: Infected and non-infected.
 

donP

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The DR is ill prepared for Ebola.

"Salud P?blica" has so far not given any protocols to fight a possible Ebola case; it had earlier been announced that such measures exist.
Health workers in the DR claim that there are no measures of prevention nor safety in place.

It is learned that an isolation unit is being set up in the Hospital Ney Arias Lora.

Salud P?blica no ofrece protocolo sobre el ?bola - listindiario.com

donP
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
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"Salud P?blica" has so far not given any protocols to fight a possible Ebola case; it had earlier been announced that such measures exist.
Health workers in the DR claim that there are no measures of prevention nor safety in place.

It is learned that an isolation unit is being set up in the Hospital Ney Arias Lora.

Salud P?blica no ofrece protocolo sobre el ?bola - listindiario.com

donP

Nobody is ready for Ebola, just that some nations have more resources at hand to deal with it, but far from ideal or "ready".

Ebola hits like a train wreck but one that's non-stop and with little to no way to stop it from keep on going.


The DR ready for Ebola? First let's see that happen with an small thingy like Cholera...
 

donP

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A 1st Step

SANTO DOMINGO
The DR immigration authority is now using a measure of control recommended by the WHO in an attempt to keep Ebola out.
All passengers arriving in the DR will be asked about the countries they have visited in the last 30 days.
Suspected cases will be entered in a database which a control unit can then evaluate for any necessary follow-up and decide whether the traveller is allowed to enter the country...

RD aplica protocolo OMS a viajeros ante alerta por el bola - Almomento.net: Periodico Digital Dominicano


donP
 

donP

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The DR ready for Ebola? First let's see that happen with an small thingy like Cholera...

:eek: :confused: :surprised PICHARDO is that you?

In case PICHARDO is now Pichardo I shall have to give you LIKES.... :cross-eye


donP
 

bronzeallspice

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Migration authorities step up Ebola prevention measures

The Dominican Migration authorities have ordered the automatic application of Ebola sanitary protocol controls at air and maritime ports in compliance with World Health Organization guidelines. The immigration computer system has been programmed to detect passengers who have recently traveled to high-risk countries. Any potential suspect will be subject to assessment.

The action coincides with the detection of an AFRICAN COUPLE FROM SIERRA LEONE WHO VACATIONED AT A NORTH COAST HOTEL FOR THREE DAYS. As reported in Diario Libre, an immigration clerk notified the authorities about the African couple's visit. Consequently, epidemiologist Eliza Polanco visited the tourists and tested them to ensure that they were in good health. The tourists, who traveled from Miami, were staying at a hotel in Costa Dorada.

In response to the situation, Puerto Plata International Airport (AIGGL) delegate Lic. Guarionex Vasquez Polanco circulated a memorandum dated 14 October 2014 informing of the start of prevention measures. As reported, they were already in the pipeline for implementation.

Source: DR1 news
 

bronzeallspice

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Is that the first thing that comes to your mind? :cheeky: But it's okay for gringos to announce it.

Seeing how this has hit the US and Europe it can hit anywhere else.

Those who are really scared don't want to hear about what could happen because it hits home.

Call it what you want but Ebola will spread, then talk about panic mongering.

Wait until it hits the DR, then you'll be singing a different tune.

Instead of being biased, why don't you focus on the crisis at hand instead.
 
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Criss Colon

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If EBOLA gets a foot hold in the DR, or Haiti, it's OVER!!!!!!!!!
I have food, water, and fuel for my family for 3 months, hope everyone else is dead by then!!!!!

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AnnaC

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If EBOLA gets a foot hold in the DR, or Haiti, it's OVER!!!!!!!!!
I have food, water, and fuel for my family for 3 months, hope everyone else is dead by then!!!!!

CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

As long as you don't swap bodily fluids with anyone outside your house I'm sure you'll be fine ;)
 

bronzeallspice

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No Anna not anymore. It has changed. Read this which I posted in the other
Ebola thread in Off Topic. The longer the virus is out there, the greater the
chances of mutation. In fact it has mutated, many times.


The World Health Organization has issued a bulletin which confirms what Natural News has been asserting for weeks: that Ebola can spread via indirect contact with contaminated surfaces and aerosolized droplets produced from coughing or sneezing.

??wet and bigger droplets from a heavily infected individual, who has respiratory symptoms caused by other conditions or who vomits violently, could transmit the virus ? over a short distance ? to another nearby person,? says a W.H.O. bulletin released this week. [1] ?This could happen when virus-laden heavy droplets are directly propelled, by coughing or sneezing??

That same bulletin also says, ?The Ebola virus can also be transmitted indirectly, by contact with previously contaminated surfaces and objects.?

In other words, the WHO just confirmed what the CDC says is impossible ? that Ebola can be acquired by touching a contaminated surface.

CDC remains in total denial, spreading dangerous disinformation about Ebola transmission vectors

This information published by the WHO directly contradicts the ridiculous claims of the CDC which continues to insist Ebola cannot spread through ?indirect? means.

According to the CDC, Ebola can only spread via ?direct contact,? but the CDC is basing this assumption on the behavior of the Ebola outbreak from 1976 ? nearly four decades ago.

The CDC, in fact, continues to push five deadly assumptions about Ebola, endangering the lives of Americans in the process by failing to communicate accurate safety information to health professionals and the public.

Because of the CDC?s lackadaisical attitude about Ebola transmission, the Dallas Ebola outbreak may have been made far worse by people walking in and out of the Ebola-contaminated Duncan apartment while wearing no protective gear whatsoever.

Because the CDC sets the standards for dealing with infectious disease in the United States, when the CDC claims Ebola can only spread via ?direct contact,? that causes emergency responders, Red Cross volunteers and even family members to conclude, ?Then we don?t even need to wear latex gloves as long as we?re not touching the patient!?

World Health Organization Contradicts US Centers for Disease Control: Admits Ebola Can Spread via Coughing, Sneezing and Contaminated Surfaces | Global Research
 

cobraboy

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(Part 1)

Interesting non-political perspective from a nurse named Dustin Tolar who is experienced with infectious diseases:

Ebola, A Nurse's Perspective

So a few months ago the country was enthralled with the idea of a few patients, infected with the Ebola virus, coming to the United States. Up until this point, we had been safe from Ebola due to the fact that bats can?t fly over the Atlantic. Some people were completely indifferent, while others had seen Outbreak one too many times. Most were a healthy mix, somewhere in between, but what bothered me the most was both the lack of education and the poor information that was spreading more virulently than the virus could ever hope to.

First, I want to stress that I am a nurse, not a virologist, and hopefully throughout my post you will see that I am not pretending to be one. I have a Bachelor?s in Nursing and am currently a graduate student. I have worked extensively with Infectious Disease Specialists. I have been exposed to almost every infectious disease known to the modern world. I have taken courses in Biology, Microbiology, Anatomy, Physiology, Pathophysiology, Advanced Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and an assortment of others. However, I am not and will not pretend to be an expert, just an experienced professional. When it comes to an epidemic of any sort, my first focus is on the patient, protecting and healing them, my second focus is on protecting the community. I don?t care about which strain does what, or what we can do with in lab. As a nurse, I concern myself with the current patient and future possible patients. I feel the first thing we should examine is Ebola itself. It is foreign to the US, both literally and figuratively. What it does to people and how it harmonizes with nature are both things that most westerners have little concept of. It is a virus, not a bacteria. This means that it is not its own organism. It is actually much smaller and basic than you can imagine. It is nothing more than a few pieces of DNA/RNA and some proteins. No cell wall, no cytoplasm, no metabolic functions. This is both their advantage and their downfall. Viruses require a host. For this example I will use the HIV virus. HIV gets into the human body and invades the host?s white blood cells, T4 cells to be exact but I won?t get that involved. The proteins help get the virus into the cell and those few small sequences of DNA/RNA write themselves into the host DNA/RNA. Now instead of the white blood cell attacking invaders, it is nothing more than an HIV factory. All of its metabolic functions are redirected at producing more of the virus, which pours out of the white blood cell like a sieve until eventually the host cell dies. This is why HIV infected patients have poor immune systems. The virus re-writes the DNA of the host cells. This is not something we can stop. New viruses are pouring out of the white blood cells at a rate of millions a day. We cannot filter them out. We cannot ?kill? a little chunk of DNA and we don?t know enough about the human genome to correct the DNA sequences. This is why a lot of viral infections like HIV, Herpes, and Hepatitis are life long infections. HIV invades the white blood cells, Herpes invade the nerve roots, and Hepatitis invades the liver.

Now that we have a better grasp of viruses, we will focus on Ebola a bit more. In tropical Africa, Ebola naturally lives in bats. It is nice to the bats and doesn?t cause them many issues. It is rumored that there are many viruses humans carry our entire lives and have no idea because they show zero symptoms. Therefore, they have never been studied. If this sounds crazy, just remember that it was in recent years the we discovered there was a virus behind cervical cancer. A virus that men can carry and spread without ever knowing they have it. Where the problem arises is that in tropical Africa, people like to eat bats. Sometimes they get infected with Ebola and it spreads. This process is called Zoonosis and can be true of bacteria or viruses. Racoons carry Rabies, Armadillos carry Leprosy, Birds carry the Flu, Bats carry Ebola.

When I said Westerners don?t really understand Ebola, the primary aspect that I am talking about is the patient. We don?t ever see what Ebola does. Our media is too censored, we hear how many died, and see people in haz-mat suits. Speaking of suits, we?ve all seen the pictures. Rubber gloves are adequate for AIDS and hepatitis, a simple mask (N95) stops Tuberculosis, but this requires space suits, just keep that in mind when you think its no big deal. So here is what happens when you catch Ebola, I figure you?re getting bored with reading right about now, so I?ll spice it up. First the virus gets into your system, I?ll elaborate on that later. Then, it hangs out for a few days, even up to 21, growing, multiplying at a rate of millions a day, and guess what, you?re infectious. Now at this point it would pretty much require a straight blood to blood interaction so the only real threat here is for IV drug users who share needles. Just like with the flu or hand foot and mouth disease, you can be spreading it to others before you show a symptom*(apparently not many see the *, so please read the elaboration at the bottom). Remember, nurse mind set, protect the community. At first it?s not bad, little nausea, some sweating, diarrhea, much like a stomach bug. But then the virus really starts to build up in your liver and adrenal glands, after it has saturated your blood cells, the lining of your vessel, your skin, and bones. Hepatocellular necrosis occurs, which is fancy term for your liver starts to decompose.Your liver is what regulates blood clotting. This causes your blood either clot up and turn to jelly in your veins, stay liquid and bleed profusely, or a combo of both. The adrenal glands then do the same, causing your blood pressure to drop. This requires lots of IV fluids to keep your circulating volume up. At the same time inflammatory cytokines are released which causes vascular leakage. Cells don?t do a good job of holding things together so it all becomes a bloody goop. Anywhere in your body that blood vessels are shallow, like your nose, ears, gums, throat, GI tract, urethra, vagina, rectum, all start oozing fluids and bleeding because the tissues that normally keep it contained are disintegrating. So now you bleed from every orifice, including your eyeballs. Every time someone or something touches you, your tissue gets damaged which further the cycle, so a shot in the arm can turn into a massive blood blister. Those who survive are left with massive scarring. Since the adrenals cannot keep your blood pressure up, and you are losing blood and fluids, we have to put IV fluids in to keep you out of hypovolemic shock. This in turn reduces your blood concentration, lowering your oxygen carrying capacity, which causes your heart to race. So you lay in bed, oozing fluids from everywhere, all while feeling like you just ran a marathon, with bloody diarrhea, oh and did I mention pain? Lots and lots of pain, but you can?t have any pain medicine because your liver and kidneys have failed. This why it pains me when I see this outbreak ONLY has a 50% death rate, when in Africa it is up to 90%?ONLY 50%. That is literally worse than cancer, and people are blowing it off. Imagine if cancer was infectious, and you lived in a country with zero cancer, and someone thought it would be a good idea to fly a few people in. I think there would be a different attitude.

The biggest part of the discussion is how Ebola is spread. I will say two things on the topic, no, it is not airborne, and yes, basic hygiene plays a HUGE factor. But while on the topic of whether it is or is not airborne, the definition of an airborne contagion is one that can freely float in the air, survive lengths of time, and infect someone else. VERY few things fit in this category, most have been eradicated, Small Pox, Tuberculosis, Measles. Things that are also NOT airborne, are the flu and the cold. For the flu, you have to come into direct contact with the patients body fluids. How then, do you explain why people catch it and have no idea how. Well for one, people can spread it before they show symptoms, just like Ebola, and one other HUGE factor?droplets?.let that word really sink in. The virus may not be airborne, but the droplets are. I?m going to digress for a second and get back to HIV and Hepatitis, while I let droplets dwell in your mind. Everyone knows that HIV and Hepatitis are spread by blood contact, and sexual fluids, I don?t mean a drop of blood on the skin, or even a mucous membrane, it has to get INSIDE of you. This is why only gloves are required. HIV and Hepatitis are not found in urine, stool (Some forms of hepatitis are, but you have to eat the stool to get infected) saliva, sweat, tears, or mucous. This is where some viruses are different. The flu gets into your mucous and other secretions, Ebola tends to stay in the blood, but remember, every one of your bodily fluids are full of blood now. So a person with the flu sneezes, and now millions of little droplets (remember those guys?) shoot out of their nose at nearly mach 1, all across the room, same for a cough, all it takes is a little microscopic droplet to land in your eye, nose, mouth, or the unlikely scenario of an open wound, and you?ve now been infected, because you came in CONTACT with their bodily fluids. I see the word contact thrown around a lot, but most people think of mass amounts of contact with blood, but what they don?t realize is that contact also includes microscopic mucous and saliva droplets, each one chock full of Ebola. Bacteria can survive for long periods of time without a host because they are their own organism. They can feed on just about anything and be happy. Viruses lifespan without a host is much shorter. Their goal is to infect, replicate, and spread, if they cant replicate, they die. Measles only lives 2 hours. But Ebola, depending on what data you look at, can survive for several days.

So with all this information, lets have some role play, so that you can see exactly what this means, to a nurse, in the real world. Imagine it as a cheesy PSA or lifetime movie. You go to see your doctor because its that time of year, you need some blood drawn and refills of your blood pressure med. You sit patiently in the waiting room, thumbing a magazine while your 2-year-old plays with her toys. Like all two year olds, she touches everything, and everything goes in her mouth, toys, pens, her own fingers. She is a 22 lb drool factory and you love her to pieces. You see the doctor, get your goodies, and go home. A week later your angel starts vomiting blood and within 3 days she dies because her heart raced so fast it finally gave up while trying to maintain a blood pressure. Her eyes are blood red and demonic, her skin falls off in sheets. What you don?t know is that 3 days before your visit, someone thought they had the flu. It is October you see and they sneezed while thumbing through that very same magazine you thumbed through. The same thumb you grabbed her pacifier out of your purse with in the waiting room. The people caring for Ebola patients wear space suits, and burn the bodies, yet it still spreads. Here in America, we have much better protocols, and much better hygiene. So if it spreads, it will be contained much better. Still, it spreads prior to symptoms and survives will outside the body, just like the flu. Despite vaccines and good hand washing, thousands still get the flu every year. But while the flu kills 1-2% of its victims, Ebola kills 50% on a good day, and spreads the same way. So please, do not write it off as hype. It is a real thing and it is here.

The case in Dallas has been confirmed. The patient had contact with five children and adolescents prior to admission. Those five kids attend four of the largest schools in Dallas. One sneeze and we could already have thousands of people, who don?t know it yet, infected.
 
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