Haiti News and Politics

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
42,578
6,186
113

Translation: Santo Domingo.- A Haitian journalist died this Sunday after being shot in the head when police opened fire on reporters demanding the release of a colleague who was arrested while covering a protest. Romelo Vilsaint worked for an internet news site. His body was face down inside the parking lot of a police station in the Delmas commune, in the capital Port-au-Prince, surrounded by colleagues who cried and raised their arms.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: AlterEgo

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
42,578
6,186
113

Translation: SANTO DOMINGO.- Former Haitian presidential candidate Eric Jean Baptiste and his security guard were assassinated by one of the gangs that have controlled Haitian territory for several months. Jean Baptiste, general secretary of the Rally of National Progressive Democrats (RDNP) and former Haitian presidential candidate, was shot dead on a highway as he was on his way to his home last Friday night.
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
42,578
6,186
113
SANTO DOMINGO.- The Minister of Foreign Affairs, Roberto Álvarez, said that Haiti is experiencing the most difficult situation in all of history, leading the Haitian government to a condition of survival, but there will be no refugee camps in Dominican territory.

The foreign minister flatly denied that there is any kind of commitment from the Dominican Republic to accept refugee camps in several border provinces and attributed that version to the existence of a study by the previous administration that lacks legal force.

"That is false, of all falsehoods," Álvarez reacted when Pablo McKinney, on his television program "McKinney", by Color Vision, asked him if the country had a commitment to accept refugees in the event of an aggravation of the Haitian situation.

He stated that both he and President Luis Abinader have repeatedly warned that refugee camps will not be accepted in the Dominican Republic and recalled that this was one of the reasons why the country did not sign the Los Angeles Declaration of the Summit of the Americas , because there was a compromise on migration and refuge that the United States proposed and "we didn't want it to be misunderstood."

Álvarez revealed that the United States "questioned us" why the declaration was not signed and "I explained" to the secretary (Antony) Blinken.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bob saunders

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
42,578
6,186
113

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
6,711
5,785
113
Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com

Translation: Santo Domingo.- A Haitian journalist died this Sunday after being shot in the head when police opened fire on reporters demanding the release of a colleague who was arrested while covering a protest. Romelo Vilsaint worked for an internet news site. His body was face down inside the parking lot of a police station in the Delmas commune, in the capital Port-au-Prince, surrounded by colleagues who cried and raised their arms.
There's a video of his body circulating on whatsapp. It ain't pretty.
 

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
This article is from the Haitian Times - from LAST month -
PORT-AU-PRINCE — The killing of journalists Frantzsen Charles and Tayson Lartigue has led to calls to better prepare and protect journalists in Haiti, especially those new to the field and eager to establish their reputations by covering dangerous assignments.

Charles and Lartigue were among seven journalists who went to Cité Soleil to interview the mother of Christella Delva, 17. The girl had been killed while riding in a van on Sept. 10, when a stray bullet struck her in the head. As the group of reporters left the neighborhood on motorcycles, alleged gang members fired on Charles and Lartigue.

“The team was targeted,” Ricot Librun, a colleague, told The Haitian Times three days after the Sept. 12 killing. “The bandits allowed a motorcycle taxi driver who was on the road pass before they started shooting.”

Latigue reported for ‘Ti Jenn Jounalis’, an online news site that he had founded, while Charles reported for the online newspaper FS News Haïti. Both covered local news, especially violence by the armed gangs that have been growing in strength in recent years in the capital.

Their deaths bring the number of Haitian journalists killed on the job this year to five, according to Dieudonné St-Cyr, secretary of the Collective of Online Media (CMEL). On Jan. 6 gang members shot two reporters, John Wesley Amady and Wilguens Louis-Saint, after they finished reporting on violence in Fessard locality in Laboule 12. On Feb. 23, Maxyben Lazarre died when armed men in police uniforms shot into a crowd of demonstrators.

“Press freedom is greatly threatened in Haiti, especially over the past 10 years,” St-Cyr said. “They are threatened not only by bandits but also by police officers who sometimes take journalists for their enemies and attack them or consider them allies of bandits when they [journalists] go to the slums area to do their work.”

St-Cyr also criticized the owners of some online media outlets who push young journalists, many eager but without the experience to investigate complicated assignments, for the sake of views and followers.

“These are sensational media, they live off the scoops and hot subjects,” St-Cyr said. “I ask these owners to help these young professionals to better practice their profession and to protect themselves to prevent them from losing their lives in these circumstances.”

CEMEL was helping the parents find the bodies of their children who remained in Cité-Soleil, but St-Cyr fears the worst.

“According to our sources, unfortunately the bandits burned the bodies of the two young journalists. Therefore, the parents may not be able to recover the bodies,” he said.

St-Cyr hopes that the police will at least follow up so that justice is done.

 
  • Like
Reactions: JD Jones

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
The "Haitian" voices over on Twitter are still all screaming "NO" to an international intervention.... (although there are a few "useful idiots who are calling for Russia and China) ,., and there does not seem to be any country eager to lead troops

So - it looks as if the supplies for the police will dribble in.. and groups of the newly formed "army" will be trained in Mexico --

Did I report that the Justice Minister was not allowed to board a flight to the US as his visa had been revoked? this guy -https://www.nycaribnews.com/articles/new-justice-minister-sworn-into-office-in-haiti/
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
6,711
5,785
113
Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com
https://foreignpolicy.com/2022/10/31/haiti-us-intervention-gangs-united-nations/

Haiti’s Elites Keep Calling for the U.S. Marines​

...In the nearly 90 years since that first U.S. occupation ended, U.S. and U.S.-backed forces have remained the most constant factor in Haiti: training and arming Haitian militaries, meddling in elections, and alternately reinstalling and overthrowing Haiti’s leaders. In the last 30 years, U.S. troops have invaded or otherwise intervened in Haiti three times: in post-coup invasions in 1994 and 2004 and to quell feared unrest (which never materialized) after the 2010 earthquake.
In the intervening time, the United States explicitly outsourced its occupations to other countries’ troops: first, a U.N. mission from 1993 to 1997, and then under a mostly Brazilian-led multinational force that controlled Haiti’s streets and rural areas from 2004 to 2019. The latter force, known by its French initials as Minustah, left as its main gifts to Haiti an abandoned generation of children fathered by the U.N. troops and a catastrophic cholera epidemic started by a battalion from Nepal.

Two years after the last U.N. mission left, in July 2021, Haitian President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated at his home in a suburb of Port-au-Prince. Moïse was the hand-picked successor of Michel “Sweet Micky” Martelly, a popular singer-turned-right-wing nationalist who became president thanks to the electoral interference of the Obama administration in the post-2010 earthquake election. (Martelly had been allowed to go through to the second round after then-U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton accused the sitting president of fraud to benefit his own protégé.) Though the plot that led to Moïse’s assassination remains unsolved, this much is clear: He was killed by a group of gunmen, mostly consisting of Colombians and claiming to be agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Indeed, at least two of them were in fact former DEA informants. A New York Times investigation found evidence that the men may have been looking for a list of drug traffickers Moïse was intending to expose. The Intercept reported that several had received U.S. military training.

snip

In Haiti—which has its own obvious problems with narcotrafficking—the U.S.-supported rot runs even deeper, to the democratic vacuum that a century of U.S. invasions, occupations, and interference has left in its wake. Sending an armed force to do battle with one Haitian gang and its sponsors may briefly win the de facto government (or Chérizier’s other rivals) access to the fuel port, but it will do nothing to make Haiti a safer or more stable place for its people to live in the medium or long term.

It is not clear when or if the resolution approving an armed force will be taken up by the Security Council. China and Russia have both signaled skepticism about the U.S.-backed mission. Asked for comment, a State Department spokesperson told me: “While we envision this mission would be authorized by the [Security Council], such a mission would rely on voluntary support from the international community, and our draft resolution explicitly asks for contributions of personnel, equipment, and other resources.” Already, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Northland has been dispatched to the Bay of Port-au-Prince, and the United States and Canada have jointly delivered tactical vehicles “and other supplies” to the Henry government.

This will, in effect, just bolster another gang: the clique that Henry currently represents, its allied elites, and whatever loyal faction they favor within the Haitian National Police. In other words, outside force may give a different group access to the fuel port and keep the current clique in relative power a little longer. But it will do nothing to prevent the violence and inequality that rive Haitian society. Only forcing the unpopular and manifestly undemocratic Henry government to share or cede power, preparing the ground for eventual elections and a return to Haitian democracy, and ending a century of destructive U.S. interference in their affairs, will give ordinary Haitians a shot at survival.
 

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
I am really glad that Jonathan Katz has gotten some REAL writing gigs as a specialist since he was the reporter who broke the UN/Cholera story... He was a young AP reporter at the time... and crawled on up to the open sewage pits by the UN... yup

cholera
 

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
There seems to be a consensus growing over on HaitiTwitter which is international - Haiti/US/Canada/France/UK - composed of Haitians, Diaspora,. in all places - Haiti watchers - educators -- left wing US apologists -- Ye olde Socialist Left... (who keeps thinking that there IS one)
That
.1. Military intervention is really bad idea that no one wants & it will not work
2. All foreigners are wicked imperialist enslavers (you really have to get that one or you can't even get ADMITTED onto HaitiTwitter - they will just throw you on the ground and stomp on you)
3. We are now moving on to see Which of the 24 different groups who claim to represent a majority might be willing to join with other groups who claim to represent a majority
 
  • Sad
Reactions: NanSanPedro

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
Now HERE is something interesting - from an account that I have been following for a few years (or at least seems that way) - I used to think that she was just a "screamer" as in "Down with Yankee Imperialism" -- since there are a ton of those.
But I am now beginning to think that she (if she is indeed a she -may be the most reliable source from the ground---sending it around to check
 
  • Like
Reactions: NanSanPedro

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
There is some REAL Truth telling happening now over on Twitter
one of the latest tweets

"The Dominicans have made the Dominican Republic a paradise land so that they can live there decently while the Haitians have made Haiti a living hell almost everyone feels uncomfortable living in the country. Finally, when will the change of Haiti?" Les Dominicains ont fait de la République Dominicaine une terre paradisiaque afin qu’ils puissent y vivre convenablement tandis que les Haïtiens ont fait d’Haïti un enfer presque tout le monde se sent inconfortable en vivant dans le pays. Finalement,à quand le changement d’Haïti?

(Interesting thing about this account - as I am learning my way about Twitter - She only follows 2 people
But has over 5,000 following her
Among them 47 accounts that I follow
including the Embassy of Canada

So This is a Big Cheese!

7:03 PM · Oct 23, 2022·Twitter for iPhone

117
Retweets

28
Quote Tweets

521
Likes
 
  • Like
Reactions: NanSanPedro

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
PORT-AU-PRINCE — Along Route de Delmas this past Monday, street vendors set up shop on the sidewalks, once more stacking appliances onto shelves, leaning bed frames and mattresses against walls, and hanging shoes and clothing in the open markets.

One one side of the road, buyers with shopping bags in hand, bargained for prices they could afford. Across the street, another group of buyers surrounded vendors of soft drinks, patés, and leafy teas. Vendors, taking advantage of a few quiet days, hawked their wares, shouting out deals to passersby.

After weeks of inactivity, residents of Delmas, as in other parts of the capital, timidly began returning to their usual activities. Two months after anti-government protests caused schools and businesses to shutter, going back out into the streets is a necessity.



“We are the people who suffered the country’s peyilòk. For several weeks, we—the poor—were stuck in our homes.”
A BANANA SELLER IN THE DELMAS NEIGHBORHOOD.
“People could not stay at home hungry, so they are forced to resume their activities,” said a motorcycle taxi driver at the Carrefour Aéorport who complained about the price of fuel sold in the black market.

“We wanted to fight for the reduction of oil price,” the driver explained. “But the politicians switched our protest focus to the demand for the resignation of Ariel Henry.”

The last large-scale demonstrations took place on Dessalines Day on October 17, organized by ‘Pitit Desalin’ – a political party led by former senator Moïse Jean-Charles in Port-au-Prince. Those protests followed an initial outcry launched Aug. 22 in Port-au-Prince, when demonstrators marched to Henry’s home, demanding his resignation. The movement spread over the ensuing weeks to Haiti’s southern region, the northern department and to other cities around the country, with protesters voicing the same frustration against the rising cost of living, skyrocketing crime and fuel shortage.

20221101_123714.jpg
Home furniture, appliances and other accessories are among the items put out for sale on Route de Delmas last Monday. Photo by Juhakenson Blaise
The return to activities this week on Route de Delmas is a sharp contrast from last month’s scenes of empty streets caused by road blockades and lack of transportation.

“We are the people who suffered the country’s peyilòk,” said a banana seller. “For several weeks, we—the poor—were stuck in our homes. But it’s with the day-by-day activities we carry out in the streets that we find our livelihood, that we survive.”

In addition to street vendors, food produce markets also began reclaiming the streets with normal hours again, even if the prices are still rising and unaffordable for the majority of residents. At electronic devices stores, shopkeepers welcomed impatient customers coming to buy new items or repair damaged devices.

Buses used for commuter transport were seen in smaller numbers. With gas skyrocketing in price and being scarce, a few drivers managed to get a gallon for 5,000 gourdes, about USD $39.

Still, some people said, staying home was a sacrifice.

“People were suffocating at home,” said a soft drink vendor at the Carrefour Aéorport intersection along the Delmas Road. “We are all waiting for this moment of calm to start running our little business again.”

“For several weeks, we the poor were stuck in our homes while it is day by day that we carry out our activities in the streets to find our livelihood to live.”
STREET VENDOR IN DELMAS.
Still shuttered are gas stations and pumps, since the fuel warehouses at Terminal de Varreux remain under the control of the G9 Family & Allies gang. The lack of oil has also caused many hospitals to reduce their activities or to completely close.

Commercial banks have adopted a modified schedule where they open three days per week for a few hours.

Across Port-au-Prince, drinking water is being sold at a higher price than usual. A five-gallon container of water jumped from about $0.25 before the lockdown to about $1.10 now.

https://haitiantimes.com/2022/11/02/activities-restart-in-haitis-capital-after-weeks-under-peyilok/
 

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
Well -- now today it seems that Trudeau is saying that "we MUST do something about Haiti"
and the US is contemplating whether Haitians picked up at see will be shipped to Guantanamo rather than returned to Haiti,....