LIQUID MEDICINEs & TSA “RULES” & JFK AIRLINES

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rey

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Jan 2, 2007
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Can someone here share his or her experience dealing with bringing in on a carry on LIQUID MEDICINE that goes beyond the 3-1-1 TSA rule or that goes beyond the allow 3.4 OZ of Liquid a passenger can bring onboard the plane as a carry on.


Is it allowed at longest it’s medicine ? Would they give you a hard time even if it’s allowed , is it a gray area where it depends who checks you , do you need the prescription on you , etc etc etc …. Feel free to comment or reply with anything that might be related to this concern
 

RDKNIGHT

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Mar 13, 2017
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Can someone here share his or her experience dealing with bringing in on a carry on LIQUID MEDICINE that goes beyond the 3-1-1 TSA rule or that goes beyond the allow 3.4 OZ of Liquid a passenger can bring onboard the plane as a carry on.


Is it allowed at longest it’s medicine ? Would they give you a hard time even if it’s allowed , is it a gray area where it depends who checks you , do you need the prescription on you , etc etc etc …. Feel free to comment or reply with anything that might be related to this concern
TSA web site covers all this... bigger than 3.4 check on ...
 
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bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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dr1.com
from the website:
Inform the TSA officer that you have medically necessary liquids and/or medications and separate them from other belongings before screening begins. Also declare accessories associated with your liquid medication such as freezer packs, IV bags, pumps and syringes. Labeling these items can help facilitate the screening process.

3-1-1 Liquids Rule Exemption

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to TSA officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

Remove medically necessary items from your carry-on bag. These items will be screened separately from your other belongings. You are not required to place your medically necessary liquid, gel, or aerosol in a plastic zip-top bag. If a medically necessary liquid, gel, or aerosol alarms during the screening process, it may require additional screening and may not be allowed.

The 3-1-1 liquids rule exemption allows certain items to be carried in the cabin of the aircraft when the item is declared and it is:

  1. Required during your flight and/or at your travel destination;
  2. Not available at the airport in the sterile area (after the screening checkpoint) and/or;
  3. Not available at your travel destination.
Common examples of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols include but are not limited to:

  • Prescription liquids, creams, and gels;
  • Breast milk, infant formula, baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches), and toddler drinks;
  • Ice, gel, and freezer packs used to cool breast milk, infant formula, and or other medically necessary items;
  • Hand Sanitizer, less than or equal to 3.4oz/100 ml allowed per passenger.
 
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