New Rental Bill

windeguy

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Santo Domingo.- The Association of Real Estate Agents and Companies (AEI) expressed its disagreement with several aspects of the bill on real estate rentals and evictions in the Dominican Republic. The association believes that these measures are detrimental to the dynamic real estate sector, which is crucial for the economy and foreign direct investment.
Alberto Bogaert, the president of AEI, stated that the new legislation significantly alters the rental dynamics in the country due to changes that were made without consensus. These changes include limitations on the amount of deposit, restrictions on the landlord’s right to choose tenants, and the power to evict tenants who breach their contractual obligations.
The bill has already passed the initial review in the Chamber of Deputies, where it was approved in the first reading last week. It will now go back to the special commission for further study, then undergo a second reading in the Chamber of Deputies before being sent to the Senate for analysis.
The bill proposes the collection of a single deposit for rental units and prohibits discrimination based on nationality, ethnicity, beliefs, social status, or other factors when determining rental conditions.
Given the progress of the bill, the AEI believes that a comprehensive review is necessary to avoid jeopardizing real estate investment in the country and to ensure that the rental market remains robust.
The Dominican Association of Builders and Housing Promoters (Acoprovi) also provided its contributions and observations on the bill. They emphasized the importance of having a rental law that addresses the current reality and provides comprehensive legal security to ensure the well-being of all parties involved and access to decent housing.
Both associations are closely monitoring the progress of the legislative process and hope that the bill will be approved to strengthen the regulatory framework of the real estate sector.
 

SKY

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Rental laws here have ALWAYS favored the client over the landlord. As most here know people can rent from you, stop paying, and stay a long while before getting them out. And we know who most of the culprits are................This will only make it worse, as you will have trouble choosing your tenants..................
 
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johne

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What is meant by "restriction on LL right to choose tenants"?? Did I read that right??
 

Seamonkey

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Rental laws here have ALWAYS favored the client over the landlord. As most here know people can rent from you, stop paying, and stay a long while before getting them out. And we know who most of the culprits are................This will only make it worse, as you will have trouble choosing your tenants..................
It's no different in Canada. Almost impossible to evict a tenant. I think it's easier in the DR to just go to the house and throw their stuff into the street and change the locks.
 

SKY

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It's no different in Canada. Almost impossible to evict a tenant. I think it's easier in the DR to just go to the house and throw their stuff into the street and change the locks.
Not really. Landlords have been arrested for just turning off the water or electric.............
 
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El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
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It's no different in Canada. Almost impossible to evict a tenant. I think it's easier in the DR to just go to the house and throw their stuff into the street and change the locks.
Wow. I'd love to see you do that on a social media video. There are a few laws in this country that the courts stand by religiously 1) labor law, in favor of the employee; 2) rentals, where the law favors the renter. I'll put child services at 3 because it's so heavily influenced by ones political affiliation . If you throw someone out without due process of the fuerza pública (Desalojo) then you will be looking at jail time.
 

Seamonkey

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Oct 6, 2009
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Wow. I'd love to see you do that on a social media video. There are a few laws in this country that the courts stand by religiously 1) labor law, in favor of the employee; 2) rentals, where the law favors the renter. I'll put child services at 3 because it's so heavily influenced by ones political affiliation . If you throw someone out without due process of the fuerza pública (Desalojo) then you will be looking at jail time.
Only idiots post videos.
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
Jan 7, 2016
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They're working on making evictions easier:


"The special commission that is in charge of studying the bill on real estate rentals works quickly to achieve rapid approval of the initiative in the new extraordinary legislature that began yesterday.

The debates of the deputies around the law are focused on the creation of an entity to administer the evictions and facilitate more agile processes for homeowners
to execute the expulsions."
 

Drperson

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Sep 19, 2008
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For me present laws making it hard to evict tenants stop .from me building rental units
.we do have some commercial units. And it is easier to remove them for non payment
 

NanSanPedro

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Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com
I've mentioned before that my landlady won't rent to Domincanos/as because of their reputation. However her sister, who owns the adjacent property does rent to Domincanos/as thru Air BnB. I don't think she's had any problems.
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
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Getting closer:

(Note the link after the third paragraph on collecting deposits)

New rental law will allow tenants who do not pay to be evicted in two months​

Special commission of deputies will deliver a report on the project next week
Ismael Hiraldo Ismael Hiraldo
Santo Domingo - Oct. 26, 2023 | 12:01 am | 3 min read

The law was approved on May 24 in its first reading. ( DIARIO LIBRE/FÉLIX LEÓN )
The special commission of deputies studying the new rental law decided, by majority vote, to establish a more agile process to evict tenants who do not pay rent.
The new provisions, as agreed by the commission, will create a specialized jurisdiction that will allow evictions of non-paying tenants to be carried out within a maximum period of two months.
Deputy Eugenio Cedeño, president of the special commission that studies the law, explained that the jurisdiction that will be created with the regulations will allow the designation of a peace court and a special inspector who will be exclusive for tenancy matters.
"We will create a new, more agile and faster procedure for evictions"Eugenio CedenoPresident of the Special Commission“


What you have to know​

Cedeño maintained that, currently, the peace courts in the country "have a backlog of work" that prevents them from prioritizing disputes between owners and tenants, taking up to 10 years to be resolved in court.
"This new procedure will be agile, fast, innovative and guarantees both parties (owner and tenant)," said the deputy who chairs the special commission.

Delays in justice​

In the opinion of the legislator, judicial delays in resolving differences in tenancy matters cause the real estate market in the Dominican Republic to be hindered, giving rise to owners investing less and tenants demanding more rights.
RELATED
NATIONAL

What does the Rent Bill say about collecting deposits from tenants?

In that sense, he valued the willingness of the team he leads to create a special jurisdiction for tenancy and income, since, to date, no regulations have addressed the problem.
The lack of legal certainty, according to Cedeño, has resulted in stagnation in the development of the real estate market and has caused rent increases.

The report is "almost ready"​

The president of the special commission assured, after meeting for two hours with his colleagues, that the report on the new rental law is "almost ready" to be presented to the chamber.
Therefore, he said that the commission is advancing its work and meetings to ensure that the project is approved before the end of the current congressional legislature, scheduled to conclude on January 12, 2024.
The bill to regulate rents is authored by the president of the Chamber of Deputies, Alfredo Pacheco. It was approved in first reading on May 24 after being debated in a public consultation.
 
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CristoRey

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It takes anywhere from 8 months to 1 year to evict
tenants from a rental property if you do it the legal
way. This new law will not work. No way in hell are
property owners going to ignore a person's nationality, ethnicity,
beliefs, social status, or other factors when determining who they
will or will not rent to.
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
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It takes anywhere from 8 months to 1 year to evict
tenants from a rental property if you do it the legal
way. This new law will not work. No way in hell are
property owners going to ignore a person's nationality, ethnicity,
beliefs, social status, or other factors when determining who they
will or will not rent to.
While property owners won't ignore those things about clients, why won't the new law help owners evict tenants quicker?
 

josh2203

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Dec 5, 2013
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It's no different in Canada. Almost impossible to evict a tenant. I think it's easier in the DR to just go to the house and throw their stuff into the street and change the locks.
We're in Europe, same here... Well, at least where we are... I have seen many horror stories here in the news (yes, some of these stories make the news here as well) of landlords going broke and tenants living in their properties without paying a cent... Yes, when the time of eviction finally comes, police and all are present and everything is done efficiently, but by then the landlords usually have tens of thousands of euros in losses (rent+court+cost of emptying the property+renovations)... Imagine if the landlords are ordinary people who rely on the rental income... Or elderly people, it's very ugly... That's why I really dislike moving in Europe, as the tenant screening can be fun...