Semana Santa Info

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,624
3,275
113
The most important info are the three phone numbers (includes one for vehicle assistance which is offered for free -flat tire, run out of gas, etc- in the major highways of the DR.)
Jj2ggln.jpg


Tips of how to be safe on the road that nobody follows.
Jj2gUKX.jpg



As it says there, don’t drink and drive :ROFLMAO: , wear a helmet when riding a motorcycle :ROFLMAO:, wear your seatbelts :ROFLMAO:, go slow and follow speed limits :ROFLMAO:… alright, let me stop. But it says that and more.
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
6,711
5,785
113
Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com
I was down at the Boca Chica beach for a walk around 130 pm. Tons of security and parking hawkers. It looked busy but there were still literally hundreds of unoccupied tables and chairs. I will go back on Friday, should be interesting to compare.
 

keepcoming

Moderator - Living & General Stuff
May 25, 2011
4,906
2,693
113
Semana Santa is a very huge holiday in the DR. Right up there with Christmas holidays.
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,624
3,275
113
Semana Santa is big in just about every Spanish-speaking country with a strong Catholic tradition. I used to think maybe Uruguay was different given the high level of atheism/agnosticism there and that they have a very secular government. A few years ago I looked into that and it turns out Uruguay simply renamed Semana Santa to something else which I can’t remember right now. It’s basically a huge holiday over there too, just don’t call it Semana Santa. lol

The DR is the opposite of Uruguay when it comes to this. You will see things like a cross in the Central Bank’s auditorium and every anniversary is celebrated with a Catholic mass. There is a crucifiction and image of the Altagracia Virgin in the office of the President. Most holidays of the Dominican government are in fact from the Catholic church with the money of every single tax payers (expats included), etc. Despite that, many people do secular things in Semana Santa such as visiting beaches, rivers, etc; anything but a church. But it’s still called Semana Santa.
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,624
3,275
113
* All Catholic chapels/churches/cathedrals/basilicas in the DR are maintained the Dominican government with the taxes paid by everyone (expats included), even if you aren’t a Catholic.
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,624
3,275
113
Today’s Listín Diario has a section of several pages dedicated to several things about Semana Santa. The following 2 articles are the ones that caught my attention.

This one is of a recipies I didn’t know for 3 dishes which are great for Semana Santa. As everyone knows (or doesn’t know) Fridays during the “Cuaresma” (Lent) you are not suppose to eat mest, so in liue you consume seafood such as fish or don’t condume anything that doesn’t come from plants.

Here are recipies (in Spanish) for a tuna and vegestable pizza, tuna and vegestable sautéed, and tuna “montaditos.”

JjnEMJ4.jpg



The other is part of an article and it quickly mentions the supposed origin of the “habichuela con dulce.” It claims this csme to the DR (then still not an independent country) eith the French that fled Haiti during the Haitian Revolution. However, I doubt that for several reason which includes:

1. Why is habichuelas con dulces not consumed in Haiti? Ok, do most of the French that didn’t manage to leave were destroyed, but most isn’t all. Plus, many aspects of the French are still in existence in Haiti even if in a minority of the population, because the patriarch of all mulatto Haitian family is a Frenchman even if the French genetic contribution correspond to one guy and every generation since no new European was added to the gene pool. Not all mulattoes were born into slavery, in fact at the tine the French Revolution broke out in Paris, there were many Haitian mulattoes getting a university education in Paris becauss their French fathers had sent them and paid for their education. So e aspects and customs of the French had to remain, at least among the mulattoes in its closest purest form. Take the French language as an example. In Haiti almost all that speak and understand French are Haitian mulattoes in the higher social classes. This didn’t come from nowhere, they inherited from their parents and it goes back every generation until you reach the very first Frenchman in the gene pool. So, where is the “habichuela con dulce?”

2. If it was brought by the French running away Haiti during the revolution, then you have to take into account that a relatively small group of French actually settled for good in the Dominican territory. Many left, especially after the invasion of Dessalines as it was proof as long they remain in Hispaniola they aren’t 100% certain to not be victims of the Haitian army given whenever they felt like invading, they did and it only stopped when they gave up. If it was up to the Dominicans, there would never be a single Haitian invasion. Most of the French that fled from Haiti ended up in places like Puerto Rico and Cuba, but especially the United States in places like New Orleans. Charleston, Baltimore, even Philadelphia and NYC among other places up and down the east coast. Why “habichuelas con dulce” isn’t consumed anywhere in the USA except in families of recent arrival from the DR?

Something isn’t adding up! The only place in the world where “habichuelas con dulce” originates from and is consumed is the DR and in Dominican colonies in a handful of other countries. Generally, if someone doesn’t grow up eating “habichuelas con dulces,” they will likely not like it as it’s an acquired taste.

JjnEEgf.jpg
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,624
3,275
113
Also in today’s Listín Diario is the ban from the government of concerts on the beach during this Semana Santa. Lets see how effective is that ban, because trucks are also banned from SD malecón and well… lets say that ban exist on paper and lets leave like that. 😁

ing{
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
Jan 7, 2016
12,145
8,502
113
Poor Vladamir. He thinks he lost 825 thousand dollars.