The Mexican meaning and usage of ‘ahorita’

Marianopolita

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This video was posted in BBC Mundo this week. The meaning of ahorita varies in Mexico and the Spanish-speaking world. Context usually clarifies the meaning but its usage does cause confusion. Whether you are in DR, Mexico, Colombia, Peru etc. it is best to ask for a clarification if necessary when ahora and ahorita are used.




-MP.
 
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Marianopolita

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This link gives a good explanation with examples of the meaning of ahorita in Mexico.

 
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Marianopolita

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Ahorita vengo- what does that mean to you? Watch the short video in the link.

 

aarhus

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I have always been confused by “vengo ahora” when someone is leaving. I think it’s like I will be back in a minute. Ahorita is definitely used a lot.
 
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Marianopolita

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I have always been confused by “vengo ahora” when someone is leaving. I think it’s like I will be back in a minute. Ahorita is definitely used a lot.

That sounds very localized with respect to the meaning. If someone said that to me in the Caribbean it would mean: I will be back in a bit. If someone said that to me outside of the Caribbean I would take it to mean: I just came from…..Por ej. Vengo ahora de la escuela. Or it could mean I come now. Those are two different meanings.


Maybe not in the DR or the Caribbean but I recommend you use the idiomatic expression which is standard across the Spanish-speaking world:

Ya vengo- I will be right back


As well, ahorita in general is more Latin American than Spain. Ahorita and ahoritita both are common.
 
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drstock

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I'm not sure why we're discussing Mexican usage, as the words used here in the DR are often different from in other Spanish speaking countries. However, I often hear people here saying "ahorita mas tarde", which makes it clear that it will be some time in the future.
 

JLSawmam

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Love this!
 

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Marianopolita

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I'm not sure why we're discussing Mexican usage, as the words used here in the DR are often different from in other Spanish speaking countries. However, I often hear people here saying "ahorita mas tarde", which makes it clear that it will be some time in the future.

The Spanish forum from day one has always been open to topics about Spanish spoken in the Spanis- speaking world and not just the DR. Honestly, the forum would not be what it has been since 2005 if topics were just limited to DR Spanish.
 

Marianopolita

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In comparison, the DPD and RAE explain the usage of ahorita in Latin America:


 

aarhus

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That sounds very localized with respect to the meaning. If someone said that to me in the Caribbean it would mean: I will be back in a bit. If someone said that to me outside of the Caribbean I would take it to mean: I just came from…..Por ej. Vengo ahora de la escuela. Or it could mean I come now. Those are two different meanings.


Maybe not in the DR or the Caribbean but I recommend you use the idiomatic expression which is standard across the Spanish-speaking world:

Ya vengo- I will be right back


As well, ahorita in general is more Latin American than Spain. Ahorita and ahoritita both are common.
That’s why I find it comical. You say it could mean “I come now”. But they say it when they are leaving. I don’t think I ever heard ahoritita.
 

Marianopolita

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That’s why I find it comical. You say it could mean “I come now”. But they say it when they are leaving. I don’t think I ever heard ahoritita.
It makes sense in the context of the meaning of ahora in the DR.

Look at the definition #3 of the RAE


Yes, based on the standard meaning of ahora and in other Spanish-speaking geographies it could mean I come now - Vengo ahora.


Ahoritita and ahoritica are quite common in Latin America.
 

La Profe_1

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To be honest, "ahorita" in my office usually means "maybe I'll get to it tomorrow."

I find it to be one of the most frustrating things in my work. This refers to a particular Dominicana, not Dominicans in general.
 
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Marianopolita

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To be honest, "ahorita" in my office usually means "maybe I'll get to it tomorrow."

I find it to be one of the most frustrating things in my work. This refers to a particular Dominicana, not Dominicans in general.

I can understand how it can be frustrating but at least you know what it means so there is no false expectation. Also listen to how the person says it. Their voice and tone says a lot then you know ahorita has no time. It could be later that day, tomorrow, next week, and by then you will have given up.
 

JD Jones

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I can understand how it can be frustrating but at least you know what it means so there is no false expectation. Also listen to how the person says it. Their voice and tone says a lot then you know ahorita has no time. It could be later that day, tomorrow, next week, and by then you will have given up.
You can always ask: "Ahorita cuando?"
 

malko

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" ahorita " in my limited Dominican vocabulary, is classified the same as " si Dios quiere ".

In layman's term, it means not going to happen.
 
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