What Would it Take / To Pull Up Stakes ? (Water Shortage)

Lucas61

Well-known member
Jun 13, 2014
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retired English teacher (30 years)
Climate change has absolutely nothing to do with it. There are protests(there was one just last week in Islabon over the lack of water)and the government cracks down on the protestors pretty quick.
Oh, for sure, there are myriad factors that can explain unequal or faulty water distibution that are not explained by climate change. But based on decades of data it appears likely that climate change is effecting agricultural production in many parts of the world (rice in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam). If severe drought becomes the order of the day in the D.R. to assess if that's a function of climate change over time and not due to local variation, will require assessments by atmospheric science and there representative government bodies. Whether that capacity exists now in the D.R. as it certainly does exist for public health and epidemiology, I don't know.
 

nanita

Well-known member
Jul 28, 2014
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That chart couldn't possibly be true, could it? According to all the science deniers here there is absolutely no long term change in the climate - either in the DR or elsewhere.
WHY WAS MY EARLIER POST DELETED? MODS, if you are going to leave the original post denigrating posters like myself as 'science deniers' PLEASE ALLOW ME the chance to respond. AS I MENTIONED in my deleted post, there is a MOUNTAIN of scientific evidence against so-called 'climate change'. Please restore my post.
 

keepcoming

Moderator - Living & General Stuff
May 25, 2011
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Nanita, please re-read what you posted. Your post was NOT just about climate change. It will not be restored. You are welcome to re-post it keeping it on topic.
 
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johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
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I would think that drilling a well in the southern tier, Santo Domingo Este, would not be very expensive considering its' sea level. I would also think not very many people have drilled for wells in that sector of small residential houses. Members with experience??
 

Olly

Bronze
Mar 12, 2007
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Wells may appear to be a solution , but you have to consider the salinity if you are near the ocean and the total number of wells in your area. You also have to consider sewage contamination from nearby septic tanks. Here in Perla Marina there has been an estimate of 150 wells and being near to the ocean some have high salinity. Others have reported smelly water coming from the well water. At about 2000 US$ ago it is not cheap.

Olly
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
6,679
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Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com
Wells may appear to be a solution , but you have to consider the salinity if you are near the ocean and the total number of wells in your area. You also have to consider sewage contamination from nearby septic tanks. Here in Perla Marina there has been an estimate of 150 wells and being near to the ocean some have high salinity. Others have reported smelly water coming from the well water. At about 2000 US$ ago it is not cheap.

Olly
Our home in Boca Chica has a well. We have not given 1 peso to CorraWhatever in 3 years here. The only problem with our well is there is no breakout cable to power the pump. It's all off and EDEEste line. So no juice, no water. I don't know how deep the well is but I would guess 100 ft. Our water is never cloudy and never smells bad.
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
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South Coast
Our home in Boca Chica has a well. We have not given 1 peso to CorraWhatever in 3 years here. The only problem with our well is there is no breakout cable to power the pump. It's all off and EDEEste line. So no juice, no water. I don't know how deep the well is but I would guess 100 ft. Our water is never cloudy and never smells bad.

No cistern, no tinaco? Obviously you wouldn’t build a cistern as a renter, but tinacos aren’t terribly expensive and are gravity fed so you still have water in house without electricity.
 
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RollingStone

Member
Nov 9, 2019
48
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How does the tinaco get filled?
In NanSanPedro's case the well pump should provide enough pressure to fill his tinaco. When I lived in Andres we had water two times per week provided by CORAABO at the house and had a large tinaco on the roof. The water pressure was horrible. We used a 1/2 hp pump to fill the tinaco. New they run about 3000 to 5000 pesos depending on the brand/quality.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
May 6, 2016
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At the risk of sounding like a broken record, they publicize every project they're working on throughout the country on their social pages.

If you don't follow them, it's easy to think they're not doing anything.
Yeah they're doing some projects - most are repairs which helps but doesn't expand infrastructure
 

MariaRubia

Well-known member
Jun 25, 2019
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Maria---I need a bit of education here: I looked at the web site of Riviera Colonial that seems to promote an upscale style of living and meant to be hassle free. I get it. Now a drought comes along and whoops...Are any of these towers built to include a contingency so as to have their own source of water? Were the buyers fore warned that owners needed to rely on an outside service provider for their water? Is it clear what the ownership of such a unit might entail when faced with an assessment charge such as drilling a well?
Do these type of towers have a co-op or condo board to address such issues? Or do the developers own the majority of the units?

Basically it was a lovely idea but really badly built. Terrible architecture, the architect should be strung up. And part of that was that they didn't provide a big enough well for the development. And the developer set the maintenance charges are rock bottom, to sell the units. So you get cheapjack administration with zero budget. A lot of units bought by people who live in the US and just wanted to make money doing AirBnB. The bottom has dropped out of the AirBnB market, interest rates have gone up and now there's no water most of the time. So none of these owners want to put their hands in their pockets to come up with a solution. It ends up a complete mess.
 
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MariaRubia

Well-known member
Jun 25, 2019
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I would think that drilling a well in the southern tier, Santo Domingo Este, would not be very expensive considering its' sea level. I would also think not very many people have drilled for wells in that sector of small residential houses. Members with experience??

I think they are looking at quite a lot of money for the number of wells that a complex of 200 apartments needs. I seem to remember someone saying US$ 20,000 but I may be wrong.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
May 6, 2016
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Oh, for sure, there are myriad factors that can explain unequal or faulty water distibution that are not explained by climate change. But based on decades of data it appears likely that climate change is effecting agricultural production in many parts of the world (rice in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam). If severe drought becomes the order of the day in the D.R. to assess if that's a function of climate change over time and not due to local variation, will require assessments by atmospheric science and there representative government bodies. Whether that capacity exists now in the D.R. as it certainly does exist for public health and epidemiology, I don't know.
Climate has changed since the dawn of earth.
Nothing new, there are droughts and floods and heavy snowfall or warm winters cycling all around the world and it changes.
The fact so many people have bought into this mantra only proves one thing. You can fool and lead people to believe anything if the government repeats it enough to scare you.
Covid quarantines and masks and the vaccines should be the latest glaring example.
Remember the emergency call for ventilators? They even had General Motors mandated to make them - a car company