36% of births were to Haitian mothers

Dolores

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 20, 2019
16,058
2,491
93
Partos-Extranjeras-Santo-Domingo-Noticias-Twitter-e1641391755618.jpg


As of 12 December 2023, the public hospital network (SNS) had reported 10,854 deliveries, of which 10,838 were live births, according to a story in Listin Diario. Most of the births were in Greater Santo Domingo and to mothers between the ages of 20 and 29 years.

Of the total births, 36.1% were to Haitian mothers and 0.2% to other nationalities.

As of 12 December, the public hospital network reported 10,854 deliveries in its facilities, of which 10,838 were registered as live births.

Of the live births, 4,242 were registered in the Metropolitan Health Region, 1,222 in hospitals in the National District, especially the Nuestra Señora de La Altagracia Maternity Hospital with 1,039 reported.

In the hospitals of the province of Santo Domingo, 2,887 births were registered, of which 821 occurred at the San Lorenzo de Los Mina Maternity Hospital...

Continue reading...
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Wow
Reactions: Facepalm Supreme

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,763
3,328
113
Definitely a high percentage. I think once births in private hospitals are included, the percentage might go down a little. Also, except most Haitians and Venezuelans, I think most other foreign women that give birth in the country overwhelmingly do so in private hospitals.

According to this, 60% of Dominicans go to public hospitals, though that is an old figure from the early 2000's when the DR was much poorer than today. Dominican births in public hospitals today are more or less within a similar percentage, though in the early 2000's I think Haitian birth were less than 10% of all births in public hospitals.

If 40% of Dominicans went to private hospitals and clinics in the early 2000's, today it must be a higher percentage. Many private hospitals that exist today didn't exist back then.

 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: CristoRey

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,163
3,020
113
Is that reported number for the YEAR 2022 ending 12 Dec '22? That was not made clear.
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,163
3,020
113
Also, not clear to me:
1. Is there an exemption for mothers -to-be allowing them entry to the DR?
2. Is the hospital delivery and care free?
3. What % leaves or stays in the DR after delivery?
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,816
6,199
113
dr1.com
Also, not clear to me:
1. Is there an exemption for mothers -to-be allowing them entry to the DR?
2. Is the hospital delivery and care free?
3. What % leaves or stays in the DR after delivery?
Good questions. Public hospitals are free for patients. Doctors...etc get paid for by the government. Thwre is no exemption immigration wise, at least not officially. I dont think the government has the capacity to track all these women, many without papers or addresses. Judging by the amount of Haitian children and Haotian mothers with infants, at least where I live, many stay.
 

Kipling333

Bronze
Jan 12, 2010
2,528
830
113
What ever the exact numbers are or how they manage to arrive at a DR hospital or whether they leave or not , I am very proud that the Dominican doctors and nurses willingly fulfill their oaths to care for all those in need.
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,163
3,020
113
What ever the exact numbers are or how they manage to arrive at a DR hospital or whether they leave or not , I am very proud that the Dominican doctors and nurses willingly fulfill their oaths to care for all those in need.
You're right. Wouldn't you like to know some details as to the hard work that is done by the people of the DR? That was the reason for my inquiry.I also want to know as an offset to all governments across the world that constantly say we should do more.
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
23,314
6,566
113
South Coast
You would be surprised about how many Dominican women that have a US Visa and are pregnant go to the US to have the baby. Then come back and the baby gets dual citizenship...............

True. I know several personally.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Auryn

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,763
3,328
113
It has become common that many Dominicans go to a public hospital for medical attention or an emergency and there are no beds available for them since most are occupied by Haitians or have to go out with a certain medicine or medical supplies because what existed has been used to treat Haitiana. In the case of Haitian pregnant women, many arrive in Dominican public hospitals directly from Haiti. Their entire treatment is free of charge for them since the government assumes the costs, but the issue here is that those public hospitals are created and maintained by taxes, most of which are paid by Dominicans. That brings up the issue of how is it that a certain person thqt pays little or no taxes occupies beds, consumes the available medicines/drug treatments that then when the taxpayer from whom the funds to maintain the hospital, pay the nurses and doctors, buy the medicine, etc need to use the public hospital and find themselves with no beds or greatly depleated or depleated medicines, etc.

The government supposedly is building a public hospital in Dajabon which should aleveate the situation in many Dominican public hospitals. The hospitals suppose to be built on the border are mainly for the Haitian women that travel from Haiti to the DR to give birth in Dominican public hospitals because in Haiti there isn't one near them or if there is, is grossly deficient. Haiti aldo suffers from a severe shortage of doctors.

Speaking of doctors, one of the most common complaints of Dominican doctors is the large demabd of their services, often causing them to be overworked, overstressed, etc. This should reduce if the Haitians attending Dominican public hospitals, particularly Haitian pregnant women, decreases.

There have been several amateur videos that have become viral as they were taken by some Dominican nurses and/or patients in several Dominican hospitals complaining and showing that there are no ICU beds available for Dominicans since all are occupied by Haitians, etc.

This type of situations isn't seen in nearby countries such as Jamaica or territory such as Puerto Rico. This last one has a sizeable presence of Dominican immigrants and in not one Puerto Rican public hospitals are overrun by Dominicans rather then Puerto Ricans, much less Dominicans of the illegal immigrant types. Also in the USA, despite its large immigrant population, no such thing is seen in any American hospital. This is not seen in Dominican private hospitals since there are hardly any Haitians there except the well to do and middle class types. The fact that an emergency happens to you and you need an ICU bed, in private hospitals is almosr guaranteed there will be one for you or what also happens in public hospitals but not in private ones is for admitted patients to be placed on the hall because all the rooms for a proper medical care are taken.
 
Last edited:

FF1

Well-known member
Dec 17, 2022
349
466
63
DR
The simple solution would be to charge all foreigners and all non-residents for the service. "Gringos" are either legal residents in the country or use private clinics anyway, the Venezuelans have their papers in order, so this would almost exclusively affect the Haitians, which would be the purpose of the rule anyways. My guess is most doctors when tending to Haitians take propinas on the side and that's why this goes on.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Facepalm Supreme

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,816
6,199
113
dr1.com
The simple solution would be to charge all foreigners and all non-residents for the service. "Gringos" are either legal residents in the country or use private clinics anyway, the Venezuelans have their papers in order, so this would almost exclusively affect the Haitians, which would be the purpose of the rule anyways. My guess is most doctors when tending to Haitians take propinas on the side and that's why this goes on.
No, they are mandated to treat all patients.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JD Jones

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,763
3,328
113
The simple solution would be to charge all foreigners and all non-residents for the service. "Gringos" are either legal residents in the country or use private clinics anyway, the Venezuelans have their papers in order, so this would almost exclusively affect the Haitians, which would be the purpose of the rule anyways. My guess is most doctors when tending to Haitians take propinas on the side and that's why this goes on.
Nope, there is no pay from the Haitians.
 

CristoRey

Welcome To Wonderland
Apr 1, 2014
11,989
8,252
113
Nope, there is no pay from the Haitians.
Start charging them.
If I walk into a public hospital here with no insurance, no money and no identification it's not free for me to recieve treatment and it should not be free for Haitians either.