Drugged???? For real???

yacht chef

Bronze
Sep 13, 2009
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Ok my girlfriend and her friend were aproched yesterday by a man and a boy out side of
Creaby Express neather one are really clear what happened but both handed over there money and phones and have been in a fog so to speak all day today. I called bill **** . Tomarow thy well go to get video of what happened from the office of the creaby Express. I still don't bleave this bs but
A nother friend said he had heard of something that can be blown in a person face.
Anyone know anything about this??? Bs.
 

Dr_Taylor

New member
Oct 18, 2017
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Ok my girlfriend and her friend were aproched yesterday by a man and a boy out side of
Creaby Express neather one are really clear what happened but both handed over there money and phones and have been in a fog so to speak all day today. I called bill **** . Tomarow thy well go to get video of what happened from the office of the creaby Express. I still don't bleave this bs but
A nother friend said he had heard of something that can be blown in a person face.
Anyone know anything about this??? Bs.

There are comments across the Internet that reference scopolamine (aka devil's breath) being used as such in some Latin American countries. An Internet search will provide some information; however, I have not heard of its use in the DR.
 
“Devil’s Breath” is common to drug people with here. The people that I know who have been drugged with it has been either put in their drinks or laced in other drugs.
You can also blow the powder into people’s faces and that will get them wacked right up as well.

Watch your drinks people!!
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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“Devil’s Breath” is common to drug people with here. The people that I know who have been drugged with it has been either put in their drinks or laced in other drugs.
You can also blow the powder into people’s faces and that will get them wacked right up as well.

Watch your drinks people!!

I am one who is quick to call foul if the truth is misinterpreted in reagrds to RD happenings. This is not the case in regards to your statement regarding "Devil's Breath". It is a very real substance and has been used on Dominicans as well as tourists. There seems to be a regular outbreak of such events in clusters. Periodically within certain tourist areas, and for Dominicans usually during the Navidad and Semana Santa timeframes when people are assumed to be carrying extra amounts of money for entertainment and leisure purposes. In regards to most tourists, it is usually traveling men who fall victim to the scheme. Some assess blame as to having consumed high quantities of alcohol, others are too embarrassed to advise their friends or authorities when they wake up and find all their money and jewelry to be missing. Unfortunate, but very true. Also, not limited to RD, but also prevalent in other Latin American countries.
 

KateP

Silver
May 28, 2004
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A French national living in Punta Cana got 250,000 pesos stolen from him last week by a guy using burundanga. There have been several cases in the past several years, I personally know someone that got robbed. Don't talk to strangers!

Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk
 

yacht chef

Bronze
Sep 13, 2009
1,588
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Now I feel bad for think she was playing games. It was on her birthday and her and her friend had on the same birthday clothing I would assume looking like a target.
Guess I should trust her more. On a side note she is preaguent with my child could this hurt the baby inside of her?
 

jd426

Gold
Dec 12, 2009
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How long after this incident happened did you see her and how did she look to you ? .. Those of us who are highly allergic to Scopolamine & had a very bad reaction to it, can describe it for you ( in the mild form , Transderm-Scop brand name) used for seasickness .. Its side effects are very noticeable if you know what to look for , like bouncing Pupils , extreme dry mouth, unable to form sentences .. I imagine the full dose is much much worse.
https://www.medicinenet.com/scopolamine/article.htm
 

yacht chef

Bronze
Sep 13, 2009
1,588
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How long after this incident happened did you see her and how did she look to you ? .. Those of us who are highly allergic to Scopolamine & had a very bad reaction to it, can describe it for you ( in the mild form , Transderm-Scop brand name) used for seasickness .. Its side effects are very noticeable if you know what to look for , like bouncing Pupils , extreme dry mouth, unable to form sentences .. I imagine the full dose is much much worse.
https://www.medicinenet.com/scopolamine/article.htm
I am working out to sea so could not see her. But she was crying and made no since to me, could not understand any of it. Now 36 hours later she is giving me more details but i am still think bull shti. Just now hoping it did not hurt her pregnancy. Ie if it is really the vvd.
 

SantiagoDR

The "REAL" SantiagoDR
Jan 12, 2006
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I am working out to sea so could not see her. But she was crying and made no since to me, could not understand any of it. Now 36 hours later she is giving me more details but i am still think bull shti. Just now hoping it did not hurt her pregnancy. Ie if it is really the vvd.

I would suggest you believe her, happened to a very good friend of mine.
They had no reason to lie about it.

No motive of wanting something from their friends.
 

frank12

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Sep 6, 2011
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I hate to sound like a skeptic here, but i am very skeptical of reports like this. I remember people saying that they were drugged while at different bars in Cabarete. I remember people saying that they normally can hand their drinks, but then they couldn't believe that they could get this drunk, this easily. I remember people accusing different bars of putting something into their drinks because they got sick, got tired, got sleepy, got hungry, got weird, became horny etc.

So much stuff in the DR gets miss-diagnosed. And the less education someone is, the more apt they are to fall for hearsay and other rumors of "Powdered" miraculous drugs being blown into their faces, rendering them clueless, etc.

The problem with 3rd world countries--and this includes all of Latin America, Africa, Asia, etc. is that unsubstantiated rumors and bullsh1t are spread like wildfire. Wildfire! People fall for the most incredible, far-fetched stories unimaginable in most parts of the world. Does anyone remember the eye-witness accounts a few years back of "Witches flying around on broomsticks" in Moca. It was even on the Dominican news!!

The same bullsh1t was spread around the DR when my father was growing up in Bonao in the 1930's & 40's, 50's. Some of my Dominican relatives still believe in, and spread rumors about crazy, far-fetched, unsubstantiated, and absurd things.

When i asked my Dominican co-workers about whether or not they believed in "Witches", almost all of them said "Absolutely!" and then they went on to add even more fantastical, crazy, and absurd stories...more far-fetched then Witches flying around on Broomsticks in Moca.

Basically, you're dealing with a population who have been raised to believe in heresy, and believe in far-fetched crazy stories. Few people question and challenge stories like this.

It's only when you get to the higher educated that you find the necessary skepticism that's healthy.

So, I call the stories of powder being blown into their faces and rendering them conscious, and yet, easily manipulated and pliable, complete bullsh1t.

I hope I'm wrong. It's never fun finding out that someone is lying to you.
 
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frank12

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Sep 6, 2011
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https://www.theguardian.com/society...ath-aka-scopolamine-can-it-really-zombify-you

"One of the most enduring hoaxes you might hear in a backpacker hostel is that of the drug-soaked business card: someone hands you their card, and the drug is instantly absorbed by your skin. You fall into a zombie-like state, where you will do anything for your attacker, from empty out your bank account to pull a trigger on someone.

The drug is burandanga, or scopolamine, derived from nightshade plants, and there are countless stories about how criminals in Colombia and Ecuador use the drug, which is said to remove a person’s free will, to assault victims or rob them. It is also known as “devil’s breath” and has been described as “the most dangerous drug in the world”. It’s hard to know which are urban myths and which are genuine. The US’s Overseas Security Advisory Council warns travellers in Quito about the dangers of falling victim to a scopolamine attack, and refers to “unofficial estimates” – it doesn’t say where this figure is from – of 50,000 scopolamine incidents there every year.


Now, according to reports, the drug has been used on “dozens” of victims in Paris, and three people have been arrested. The Daily Telegraph suggests that two women had encouraged their victims to breathe in the drug, then got the victims to take them home where they stole money and jewellery.

“You get these scare stories and they have no toxicology, so nobody knows what it is,” says Val Curran, professor of pharmacology at UCL’s Clinical Pharmacology Unit. “The idea that it is scopolamine is a bit far-fetched, because it could be anything.”

Dr Les King, chemist and former forensic scientist, agrees. The idea that someone could become zombified after someone blows powder into their face “seems pretty unlikely for a start”. There is no evidence it is being used in Europe, he says. “The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction has never had any mention of scopolamine being used in this way.”


It would be hard to get hold of. “I think if you tried to order some scopolamine from a chemical company, they’d be reluctant to sell it to you,” says King. “It’s not a drug you can buy [on the street] in the way you might buy some other new psychoactive substance, some legal high, or whatever. It’s not available in that sense because it’s not a drug you would want to take for any pleasurable purpose.”

It is “horrible stuff”, says Curran. “When I used to give it to people [in experiments], they hated it – it makes your mouth really dry, it makes your pupils constrict. Certainly high doses would be completely incapacitating.” And does it remove free will? “It would completely zonk you out,” says Curran, “ but I don’t know about removing free will. It incapacitates you because you’d feel so drowsy, you wouldn’t remember what was going on. But you would do after huge doses of alcohol, or lots of other drugs like Valium or other benzodiazepine drugs.”

Scopolamine has marked amnesic effects, and is used in Alzheimer’s research. Mostly though, it is used at very low doses to treat motion sickness, usually though a transdermal patch.

It is one of those drugs with a rich backstory. It is said to be one of the first “truth serums”. In the early 20th century, it was administered by some doctors as a pain-relief drug – or rather a drug that led to the forgetting of pain – in childbirth until one obstetrician noticed how women who had been given it answered candidly to questions; he later wondered if it could be used when questioning people charged with crimes. It was used as evidence in some trials, but dubiously.

Then there are stories of it being used in Nazi Germany as an interrogation tool, and also in the middle ages by witches. “The degree to which any of this stuff is true is unknown,” says Curran. “There’s a lot of myth.”
 

frank12

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Sep 6, 2011
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I've just spent the last 30-minutes reading articles on "Devil's breath'--aka scopolamine, and the problem here is that, they would have to had ingested so much of it in order to render them in a Zombie/lethargic like state, that it's almost impossible for that amount to be given to them without them purposely ingesting it.

There is not one single confirmed case in Europe of this happening. You can read the report above in the Guardian, but there is much information out there on the internet as well.

The more I read about it, the more skeptical i am. It seems highly unlikely. There are more readily available drugs out there that would be even more effective, but then you would have to get someone to physically "Digest" them first. And then wait.

So many things could go wrong in the meantime.

It will be interesting to hear what the police think happened?
 

Expat13

Silver
Jun 7, 2008
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I've just spent the last 30-minutes reading articles on "Devil's breath'--aka scopolamine, and the problem here is that, they would have to had ingested so much of it in order to render them in a Zombie/lethargic like state, that it's almost impossible for that amount to be given to them without them purposely ingesting it.

There is not one single confirmed case in Europe of this happening. You can read the report above in the Guardian, but there is much information out there on the internet as well.

The more I read about it, the more skeptical i am. It seems highly unlikely. There are more readily available drugs out there that would be even more effective, but then you would have to get someone to physically "Digest" them first. And then wait.

So many things could go wrong in the meantime.

It will be interesting to hear what the police think happened?

Shhhhhh Frank, this devils breath has become the perfect alibi to justify the famous DR excuse for everything! Cheating, stealing, lying, you name it! "No es mi culpa". Also this Moca witch story is exactly why i always go through Puerto plata on my way to Cabarete. Enough witches here, dont need to meet the ones who can fly!
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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To the uninformed, as there seem to be some by the postings above, again....this drug is very real, and not something to make light of, or mislead tourists and expatriates in regards to, unless you are directly involved in some of the scheming behind the practice yourself. I know, because I WAS A VICTIM OF IT in my younger days. Youthful antics and buffoonery aside, it is hindsight and experience that warns you to be more disciplined in respects to your socializing skills while in uncommon or foreign territory or amongst strangers. Some horses a$$ who tries to equate this to fairytale witches, folklore, or biblical references is just that.....a horses a$$. Be mindful of your beverages, and never leave them unattended. If you go to a restroom, take them with you, or request a new one when you return to your spot at the table or bar slab. This product is not only occasionally seen within the RD, but is prevalent throughout Latin America. 30 years within the service industry does not make an expert, it solely tells that a person did not choose to alter their professional path.
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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Amazing that persons can make light of a very dangerous, and potentially fatal drug. Sad indeed.
 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
30,247
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Women everywhere are very protective of their drinks....
if the Bano calls, another girl watches her drink ... sometimes with a napkin over it.

My friend had a bad night in Cab/Sos... could hardly get out of bed in the morning...
almost nothing to drink..... throwing up, massive headache...

we can only assume it was drugs... no other apparent causes
 

frank12

Gold
Sep 6, 2011
11,847
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To the uninformed, as there seem to be some by the postings above, again....this drug is very real, and not something to make light of, or mislead tourists and expatriates in regards to, unless you are directly involved in some of the scheming behind the practice yourself. I know, because I WAS A VICTIM OF IT in my younger days. Youthful antics and buffoonery aside, it is hindsight and experience that warns you to be more disciplined in respects to your socializing skills while in uncommon or foreign territory or amongst strangers. Some horses a$$ who tries to equate this to fairytale witches, folklore, or biblical references is just that.....a horses a$$. Be mindful of your beverages, and never leave them unattended. If you go to a restroom, take them with you, or request a new one when you return to your spot at the table or bar slab. This product is not only occasionally seen within the RD, but is prevalent throughout Latin America. 30 years within the service industry does not make an expert, it solely tells that a person did not choose to alter their professional path.

What you are doing here is equating someone physically dropping a "Rohypnol"--also knonws as "Flunitrazepan" into your drink with someone blowing a white powder of some hard to get hold of "scopolamine" (you would need a large quantity and it would have to be blown directly into your face, and you would have to willingly inhale it) and blowing directly--and simultaenously- into the faces of two girls (re-read the OP's story) at the same time.

The OP said it happened to two people at the same time. Do you know how astronimically hard it would be to deliver it to two people in sufiicient quantities at the same time?

Did you read the Guardian's article about it. There is not one single case of it ever happening in Europe.