El español dominicano

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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I studied in College and have travelled through many spanish speaking countries. I have taken many advance classes in the states. I guess I am not good at fill in the blanks. What does papa mean with an accent other than dad?

It’s a term of endearment in the context in which I used it:

 

Lucifer

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Jun 26, 2012
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Watermelon= sandía….and it is definitely not a melon so in this case their correction is right. You will notice the people with low education as you say have a lot of bad grammar rather than wrong vocabulary. Keep in mind learning standard Spanish is a bonus for you because there are nineteen other countries in which Spanish is the official language. You never know your life could change and you will be around other Spanish speakers and not just hearing DR Spanish.

BTW it’s sandía = watermelon except for in Venezuela it’s patilla.
Patilla in the D.R. as well, especially older folks.
 
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kenshireen

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It’s a term of endearment in the context in which I used it:

I have seen that article before. So exactly what did your exercise say....was I pretty close
 

cavok

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It’s a term of endearment in the context in which I used it:

The way you used it, which is the way I've most commonly heard it used, I'd say most closely resembles "vato" in that list(used a lot by Mexicans) and "hermano", or "'mano" for short as in: "oye, 'mano" - commonly heard in Puerto Rico.
 

Marianopolita

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I have seen that article before. So exactly what did your exercise say....was I pretty close
I have seen that article before. So exactly what did your exercise say....was I pretty close

The article example was showing you the context. There is not always a translation for words or terms used in one language to another. Think of it as friendly other than using your name, it’s a friendly way of addressing you or talking to you. Don’t overthink it.
 

Marianopolita

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The way you used it, which is the way I've most commonly heard it used, I'd say most closely resembles "vato" in that list(used a lot by Mexicans) and "hermano", or "'mano" for short as in: "oye, 'mano" - commonly heard in Puerto Rico.

The way I used it is normal for cariño. I can’t comment on the Mexican equivalent as I don’t hear Mexican Spanish enough to be able to compare or at least with this example.
 
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