• Thread starter william webster
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Ex-Pat Fatigue Syndrome

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chico bill

Guest
Sorry to hear about your friend’s medical problem. It’s a shame to have a machine like that sitting in the garage gathering dust. Years ago the size of the gas tank on my bikes determined how far I could go without a break. Now it’s my bladder. Age ain’t kind Chico. My neighbour had an accident on his bike in the 70’s and survived it but his back was injured. He’s paying the penalty now. Severe spinal problems, limited mobility, and constant pain. I feel sorry for him because he sees me heading out on my bike and still loves motorcycles. I’ll ride for as long as my body lets me. Every now and then, if I see a motorcycle safety course going on, I get the instructors to check out my slow speed skills. So far so good. If I have to downsize to keep riding, I’ll transition to a super scooter like the BMW 650 GT. Tried the CanAm Spyder. Very stable but I don’t like the geometry of the two front and one rear wheel configuration. I’ve seen two of them in the Puerta Plata area.
Yeah if you have to transition to a CanAm you might as well buy a Kia Picante, it has AC.

In addition to his Yamaha my friend also has two Kawasaki 1000 cc bikes, a Ducati and Aprilla, all café racers and a Piaggio scooter.
He still rides the scooter but his back won't let him manage the others anymore.

It's a shame but he had his fun. Father time catches up to everyone.

Sent from my SM-A530F using Tapatalk
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
I want to thank the moderator of this forum for allowing us to post about the things that relieve our fatigue, specifically motorcycles. I know it’s not directly related to expat fatigue but it is one of the pleasures shared by many DR expats and snowbirds like me and, if it prevents us from going postal, then it’s a good thing. Jajaja!. I’ll be back down in a few weeks. One of these days I have to defecate or get off the pot and extend my winter stays to a full six months.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
Sorry to hear about your friend’s medical problem. It’s a shame to have a machine like that sitting in the garage gathering dust. Years ago the size of the gas tank on my bikes determined how far I could go without a break. Now it’s my bladder. Age ain’t kind Chico. My neighbour had an accident on his bike in the 70’s and survived it but his back was injured. He’s paying the penalty now. Severe spinal problems, limited mobility, and constant pain. I feel sorry for him because he sees me heading out on my bike and still loves motorcycles. I’ll ride for as long as my body lets me. Every now and then, if I see a motorcycle safety course going on, I get the instructors to check out my slow speed skills. So far so good. If I have to downsize to keep riding, I’ll transition to a super scooter like the BMW 650 GT. Tried the CanAm Spyder. Very stable but I don’t like the geometry of the two front and one rear wheel configuration. I’ve seen two of them in the Puerta Plata area.
A Can-Am would be far superior to not riding at all.

Or a Ural.
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
A Can-Am would be far superior to not riding at all.

Or a Ural.
I was surprised to see a very new Ural in the mall parking lot of my town last summer. A guy from Maine, if I remember correctly. Done up in military green colour. An interesting bike with a great history. Sidecars require a certain riding style. I'm a purist in the sense that I like the two wheeled motorcycle's ability to handle turns. I tend to pick back country winding roads for the pure pleasure of sweeping through the turns. I didn't feel comfortable pushing the CanAm to it's limits in the turns. The computer would kick in and slow the bike down to reduce the risk of rollover. BMW is working on all sorts of innovations to keep older guys like me on their bikes longer.
 
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bob saunders

Guest
I was surprised to see a very new Ural in the mall parking lot of my town last summer. A guy from Maine, if I remember correctly. Done up in military green colour. An interesting bike with a great history. Sidecars require a certain riding style. I'm a purist in the sense that I like the two wheeled motorcycle's ability to handle turns. I tend to pick back country winding roads for the pure pleasure of sweeping through the turns. I didn't feel comfortable pushing the CanAm to it's limits in the turns. The computer would kick in and slow the bike down to reduce the risk of rollover. BMW is working on all sorts of innovations to keep older guys like me on their bikes longer.
Which is your town. I was here about three years ago with old military friends https://youtu.be/4i62RnsIQHM?t=24
My buddy Andy has a 2017 Ducati Multistrada 1200S that he has put on 50,000 kms in Australia. He's only 60 so still a young fellow, originally from Mount Pearl.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
I was surprised to see a very new Ural in the mall parking lot of my town last summer. A guy from Maine, if I remember correctly. Done up in military green colour. An interesting bike with a great history. Sidecars require a certain riding style. I'm a purist in the sense that I like the two wheeled motorcycle's ability to handle turns. I tend to pick back country winding roads for the pure pleasure of sweeping through the turns. I didn't feel comfortable pushing the CanAm to it's limits in the turns. The computer would kick in and slow the bike down to reduce the risk of rollover. BMW is working on all sorts of innovations to keep older guys like me on their bikes longer.
I know many who have gone three-wheels instead of not riding.

Certainly, two is superior to three wheels for pure fun, especially in the twisties. But three wheels is vastly superior to a Lazy Boy and remembering the old good times.
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
Which is your town. I was here about three years ago with old military friends https://youtu.be/4i62RnsIQHM?t=24
My buddy Andy has a 2017 Ducati Multistrada 1200S that he has put on 50,000 kms in Australia. He's only 60 so still a young fellow, originally from Mount Pearl.
Moved from Halifax back to Corner Brook in 1995. Moved to Stephenville five years ago after I retired to help take care of my parents, both stricken with dementia. Jimmy Kimmel just made Dildo famous. He ran for mayor last month. His executive assistant loved the place. He was treated like royalty. Check it out on YouTube. It’s a riot. My brother in law owns two BMW’s, a 1200 GT tourer and an 850 GS. He keeps the GS at a friends place in Ireland. Uses it to tour Britain and Europe.
 
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william webster

Guest
I want to thank the moderator of this forum for allowing us to post about the things that relieve our fatigue, specifically motorcycles. I know it’s not directly related to expat fatigue but it is one of the pleasures shared by many DR expats and snowbirds like me and, if it prevents us from going postal, then it’s a good thing. Jajaja!. I’ll be back down in a few weeks. One of these days I have to defecate or get off the pot and extend my winter stays to a full six months.
This is entirely ON topic

I started this thread
What are the symptoms ?
How do we relieve them?

Seriously, it is a problem......read up on it

Adapting isn't easy for manye
 
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Grillitax

Guest
All depends on where you are at. I am in SD Centro and loud music and se fue la luz are not part of my life. I prefer the city life to sand between my toes everyday and sipping Presidente at the same watering hole.
If every single thing you need to get done wasn’t as friggin difficult, wld be much better. Also the lical culture of taking advantage of the other person is not conducive to wanting to stay. Take me back to honesty and order.
 
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chico bill

Guest
Power outages are becoming very frequent the past week. Power comes and goes every 10 to 15 minutes over the course of 3 to 4 hours.
Lost a ceiling fan last night, even though I have an inverter. Pretty sure it had to do with the power off and on so much. Not sure yet if it's the fan motor or the wall control (my suspicion).

When you grow up with power 24/7/365 it amazes me how a country like DR is 60 years behind in their electrical system.

I lived in Costa Rica 27 years ago and at that times they were behind too, but nowhere near the outages we have here.
 
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william webster

Guest
I have had a 3 week break - recharging - back on track now !!

Re- the above
You bet the off/on/off/on cycles destroy the motors of fans, washing m/c's, - most appliances

Salt air on TV's , satellite boxes.... get ruined in short order.

A fact of life....
 
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cobraboy

Guest
I have had a 3 week break - recharging - back on track now !!

Re- the above
You bet the off/on/off/on cycles destroy the motors of fans, washing m/c's, - most appliances

Salt air on TV's , satellite boxes.... get ruined in short order.

A fact of life....
We just lost our NetTalk Duo device. Maybe age, maybe something else...

And it's not just the salt. It's also the extraordinary amount of dust in the air, especially in dry season.

Our local suspension expert says that he replaces more bushings at the end of September than any other time of year because the dust friction finally takes them out. Just like our sway bar bushings. He says wet season is a slow time because the moisture hides the squeaks associated with failing suspension parts.

I never looked at car suspension maintenance as seasonal.
 
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william webster

Guest
Ain't that odd.... I just did my 2005 Wrangler bushings.....

Not a big deal but nevertheless............70,000 miles
 
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william webster

Guest
I had to do the brake pistons at the same time -- all 4....

Think there's a connection ??
 
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cobraboy

Guest
I had to do the brake pistons at the same time -- all 4....

Think there's a connection ??
If dust got into the master cylinder reservoir, a possibility.

I have had three tire valve stems fail, two just last week. This could be from pressure air not being filtered in a dusty environment. Or cheap stems. Or both.