New fashion, leaving dogs behind when moving?

Acira

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We have been looking for another long term rental for a while now and in 60 % when we visited the house, the current owner just said there would be a few dogs left behind or some were a bit more polite and asked if we would like to adopt their dogs.

We have friends who moved recently to a house in Lomas Mironas and they got with the house three dogs without any notification that this would happen.
As they have themselves already two or three dogs, they are now suddenly with a pack of 6 dogs which is not really easy.

I wonder if this the new fashion or is this typically for the North Coast?
I also wonder how people can leave their dogs behind?

Acira
 

Acira

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That is different Derfish. I am speaking of dogs who are living in the house or on the premises, not street dogs who are being fed by the owners and as such hang around the house.

I really do not understand this mentality?
 

Acira

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And lazy because as long as they live in the house they want to take care of the dogs but when they move, the dogs become suddenly 'not really their problem anymore'.

I have a pack of 8 dogs and they move with me wherever we go, pure breds and viralata's. Wouldn't dream of leaving any of them behind because 'it suits me better'.

I have had to find another home for some of my dogs after moving to a new house for several different reasons but that is what you do if you care about them.
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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if i ever moved back to europe i cannot imagine taking dogs with me. first, rotties are a controlled breed in many countries, it will be hell to get permits, pass quarantine and so on. two, rotties are big, to take both of them to europe would cost more than to move us and all our belongings. third, rent back on the continent is expensive, having a house with a garden is not likely and i cannot imagine having them in the apartment.
so yes, i kinda understand. if there is not enough money (and often such is the case) it may be difficult to take dogs/cats with you...

and no, don't go all out on me with "why did you decide to have dogs then?" because really, dogs ain't people. and i did not move to DR, get married and have dogs with a thought this all will go pear shaped sooner or later. i did all this with hope things will last and i will never have to stand to lose any of this...
 

belgiank

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Jun 13, 2009
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Nor do I in reality. My daughter does volunteer work in Minnesota driving as far as Kentucky to collect dogs who are scheduled to be put to death only because a person doesn't want them anymore. I've made the trip with her a couple of times.
But on the other hand seeing all the sick dogs here I would approve of putting them down. Leaving them behind in a house when one moves is, as you say, in a different category.
Der Fish

Putting down some of the sick dogs you see here, is an act of mercy. Not a lack of responsability. Moving back to your home-country and not being bothered leaving your dogs behind, is.

I can understand it can be difficult, or even impossible to take the dogs with you, but in that case you find a new and good home for them.

BelgianK
 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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We had the WORST looking dog show up on the property one day.
Somehow it found its way into the bathroom and hid under the counter.

Mange - skin falling off - one eye shut - just a disaster.

We called the vet and had it put down - the vet didn't want to touch it. He held it down with his rubber boot.

The poor dog wagged its tail the whole time - must have been happy for the attention.
One of the hardest things I've ever done but I think I was right in doing it.
 

Celt202

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May 22, 2004
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I had to put a 17 year old dog down once. Her kidneys were failing and she went into excruciating pain if touched the wrong way.

I took her to the vet; I was there with the vet and Lily was on an an examining table. The vet gave her an injection in her front paw and she was gone instantly but she died in fear.

If I ever have to do it again I will pay a vet to do it at home in surroundings familiar to the dog prepared with lots of affection. I'd prefer to have the injection given from behind if that's possible so the dog isn't scared at the end.

Having a dog is a commitment for the lifetime of the dog. I have a pack of three.
 

expatsooner

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Aug 7, 2004
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if i ever moved back to europe i cannot imagine taking dogs with me. first, rotties are a controlled breed in many countries, it will be hell to get permits, pass quarantine and so on. two, rotties are big, to take both of them to europe would cost more than to move us and all our belongings. third, rent back on the continent is expensive, having a house with a garden is not likely and i cannot imagine having them in the apartment.
so yes, i kinda understand. if there is not enough money (and often such is the case) it may be difficult to take dogs/cats with you...

and no, don't go all out on me with "why did you decide to have dogs then?" because really, dogs ain't people. and i did not move to DR, get married and have dogs with a thought this all will go pear shaped sooner or later. i did all this with hope things will last and i will never have to stand to lose any of this...


I totally understand why you might not be able to take your dogs with you but I am also sure that you would rehome your dogs into a very good situation before you leave. I can't imagine that you would just leave the house with the dogs runnning loose in the garden in the hands of fate. That is the big difference.
 

NY2DR

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Nov 21, 2009
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To me my dogs are like my children, so it's a lifetime responsibility as far as I'm concerned. I guess in life things happen and people have to prioritize whether a dog stays or goes. I just think it's important if someone buys, ships or adopts a dog they have to realize it's not a project or a pass time. House pets, especially dogs have a emotional attachment to their owners so abandoning them is a unfortunate situation (thats if they were orginally owned by the owner)[
I totally understand why you might not be able to take your dogs with you but I am also sure that you would rehome your dogs into a very good situation before you leave. I can't imagine that you would just leave the house with the dogs runnning loose in the garden in the hands of fate. That is the big difference.
 

oriole100

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Oct 9, 2005
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When you live with a dog they, become almost like people. You both have a language and you both understand it. I couldn,t leave him. He's not my dog. He's my hairy son. He's getting old, but when the time comes, I'll cry for days. He is always happy to see me.
 

Grandma Jen

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Jan 16, 2008
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We have friends who moved recently to a house in Lomas Mironas and they got with the house three dogs without any notification that this would happen.
As they have themselves already two or three dogs, they are now suddenly with a pack of 6 dogs which is not really easy.

I wonder if this the new fashion or is this typically for the North Coast?
I also wonder how people can leave their dogs behind?

Acira[/QUOTE]

The above sort of comments on DR1 are part of the reason I don't log on much any more.

Acira, when you quote so called facts, make sure they are the truth. The comments about "your friends in Lomas Mironas
having rented a house with three dogs without any notification" is utter and total BS.

First - You do not know what agreements or arrangements other people make as you are not party to this confidential arrangement/information

Second - You personally have no friends in Lomas Mironas - I know that for a fact!
 

Acira

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Sep 20, 2009
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We have friends who moved recently to a house in Lomas Mironas and they got with the house three dogs without any notification that this would happen.
As they have themselves already two or three dogs, they are now suddenly with a pack of 6 dogs which is not really easy.

I wonder if this the new fashion or is this typically for the North Coast?
I also wonder how people can leave their dogs behind?

Acira

The above sort of comments on DR1 are part of the reason I don't log on much any more.

Acira, when you quote so called facts, make sure they are the truth. The comments about "your friends in Lomas Mironas
having rented a house with three dogs without any notification" is utter and total BS.

First - You do not know what agreements or arrangements other people make as you are not party to this confidential arrangement/information

Second - You personally have no friends in Lomas Mironas - I know that for a fact![/QUOTE]

Whatever you want to say here Grandma Jen, I know my facts and you would be surprised how many friends I have living in Lomas Mironas.
 

Acira

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Sep 20, 2009
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But that is not what I want to discuss here. I want to know if this is usual habit on the North Coast as it gives me lesser chance to find a rental since I already have enough dogs to care for myself and in a few cases where the house was perfect, we had to decline because the owner wanted to leave dogs behind.
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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I totally understand why you might not be able to take your dogs with you but I am also sure that you would rehome your dogs into a very good situation before you leave. I can't imagine that you would just leave the house with the dogs runnning loose in the garden in the hands of fate. That is the big difference.
if we had to leave i would do all in my power to rehome the dogs. my in-laws have a big house, huge garden and few fincas, hopefully there would always be room for goggies.
apart from dogs we also have two cats, one with epilepsia, has to medicated three times a day. i know that doctor bob will take her in should we ever go on longer holidays, we already talked about it. we hardly ever leave the country for more than 10 days anyway and i'll be happy to pay for good care for pichi. but we cannot really take a weekend off anymore because who will take care of her? even miesposo is ok with that. we took pichi in not knowing she was sick and we would never kick her out now just because she needs constant care.
the same with goggies, we both do all the best for them.
as for acira's question, there are lots of gingos on the north coast. and yes, some of them, when leaving DR leave dogs too, lonely, hungry and unhappy.
 

Conchman

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I know its off topic, but I'm still haunted that I was not there when my Rottie dying from cancer was euthanized. Apparently, the vet who did the procedure, botched it and my dog suffered. I could not get myself to be there when he being put down, and I may have been able to change this situation and vet at the time, I'm not sure about this. It was the first time I had to deal with euthanizing a dog of mine, and I didn't have the 'guts' to be there. I was much younger back then. Now I have 8 dogs, many of them are getting older and I know I will have to deal with this situation again soon, especially since one of them has a serious health issue and any more operations are now out of the question. I dread the day, but I know I have to be there this time.
 

jrjrth

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Mar 24, 2011
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~I think its very irresponsible of anyone to just abandon an animal, regardless of circumstance. At best one should try to re-home the animal, or put them down if they cannot re-home them. Sad, however what is the other alternative, hope that the next person cares for them...I guess for some, its out of site, out of mind. Its unfair to the once beloved pet! and the new tenant!
 

Acira

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I know its off topic, but I'm still haunted that I was not there when my Rottie dying from cancer was euthanized. Apparently, the vet who did the procedure, botched it and my dog suffered. I could not get myself to be there when he being put down, and I may have been able to change this situation and vet at the time, I'm not sure about this. It was the first time I had to deal with euthanizing a dog of mine, and I didn't have the 'guts' to be there. I was much younger back then. Now I have 8 dogs, many of them are getting older and I know I will have to deal with this situation again soon, especially since one of them has a serious health issue and any more operations are now out of the question. I dread the day, but I know I have to be there this time.

Be there if you can Conchman. I have to do it several times already, once with our King Charles who had a hart failure but with medications she survived against all odds and became 8 but that last hot summer was too much for her and together with vet we decided to let her sleep forever. I had a cat with diabetes who I injected daily his insulin for three years but one day he had a stroke and the vet said he would not recover from that. I will never forget those eyes locked in mine when they eventually close them to go to sleep. They are in distress, they know this is not a normal situation so they look for help and you can help by being there and stroke them, hug them ( my vet is all for picking up the pet if possible and place them on my lap and giving me all the time I needed to say goodbye) and whisper sweet words into their ears until they can't hear you anymore.