Oh oh, Norberis is not happy about this...

bob saunders

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However hard she is to understand, she is correct. What non-Dominicans are claiming is culturally accepted or part of the culture vis-à-vis married women sleeping with foreigners for money with the acceptance of the husband, is not culturally accepted or part of the culture. That it happens doesn't mean it is considered either normal or acceptable behavior.
 

NALs

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I thought she was clear in her message. Yes, with a very strong accent, but still able to understand what she is saying. Surprising that others find it harder, except for maybe the hard of hearing.
 
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bob saunders

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I thought she was clear in her message. Yes, with a very strong accent, but still abe to understand what she is saying. Surprising that others find it harder, except for maybe the hard of hearing.
Her message was clear; however, she did mangle some words. I didn't find it hard to understand her.
 

CristoRey

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Culturally acceptable? No
but in towns like Sosua and
Boca Chica it's quite prevalent.
 
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Facepalm Supreme

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The most culturally accepted thing here is making money and saliendo adelante. Period. There are certain people and certain groups of people (many Adventists for example) who are more strict followers of the rules and who operate by a different code but I've seen many times that there is lots of lee-way given to people for all sorts of activities that on the face of things are otherwise "not accepted". If however it comes along with a good job or making money, or getting a visa or whatever it may be, the situation becomes much more gray and everyone from the youngest kids to the oldest grandparents will turn a blind eye to behavior that is perhaps "not ideal" but tolerated or accepted.

Family ties are also very strong here. Meaning, whatever someone does, whether or not it is "wrong" subjectively speaking has a lot to do with your relationship to them. For many, they and their families can do no wrong, no matter what the actual behaviors in question are. This is, again, especially true if this is done for, or contributes towards the families well-being or improving the economic situation.
 
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Facepalm Supreme

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So it may be best to say that certain activities are not "culturally accepted" on their face by EVERYONE but it basically comes down to a lot of dirt being done in a "hush hush" sort of way, to avoid people outside of the family learning about something that they may negatively judge or speak about, thus applying shame towards that individual or their family.

There is also a big culture here of people in general being "hush hush" about talking about others, at least publicly, or where the family in question may find out to avoid any drama or negative sentiment. As I just wrote in the "things that Dominicans do that are annoying" thread, they are quick to tell you that you offended them when you state simple facts or respectfully deny a request. That perceived offense can possibly have real-world consequences that most people try to avoid by not bringing up other people's dirt. That however makes it hard to claim that X,Y,Z behavior is not culturally accepted when in fact people do accept it by avoiding talking about it to avoid drama.

All in all this place is stuck between modern and traditional values and sentiments. Everyone wants to look like a Saint while most everyone has skeletons in the closet.
 

malko

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They are both a bit right and a bit wrong, in my opinion.

If I propose 1k€ to a random woman in my home country to go to a--- non existent--cabaña, I will get slapped and/or arrested.
In the DR, if I propose 60k pesos, I think we can all agree my odds of success are much higher.

Now, is it cultural ?
Well yes and no.
Yes, because for a dominicana, sex is a weapon, or maybe a better word is a tool.
Examples are everywhere.

And no, because economics play a huge role in my example. The wealth gap is huuuuuge in the DR, and 60k pesos is " life changing" for many, many women in the DR. More than 3 months salary in many cases.
Applied to back home, if I went around proposing 15k€, I am sure the odds would improve greatly of getting a positive answer
 

Big

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Here we go again with the top-secret Dominican culture. One must be a born and bred Dominican to belong to or understand these complex nuances. Sleeping with men for money is legal here and I don't have a problem with it. However no reputable family here will condone this behavior or knowingly socialize with woman who engage in prostitution. How will they know you ask? Watch them handle cutlery, listen to them talk, mannerisms etc. Men will use the services but seldom associate with them in professional or public forums. As a student of social behavior, I can spot an undercover working girl from 10 tables away.
 
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NALs

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Maybe this thread will become all things Norberi doesn't like. lol

Last video.

Today she uploaded a video about visiting the Da Nancy restaurant in Boca Chica. Several people told her it has the best fried fish in Boca Chica. Riiiight...

Dominicans like anything fried. Spending a lifetime of eating fried anything makes you sort of an expert of what is truly good fried anything and what isn't. So, if the fried fish didn't pass her Dominican taste buds test, this is serious.


Alright those of you that have tried many of the restaurants in Boca Chica, do you know Da Nancy? Agree with Norberis? What is the best restaurant in Boca Chica?

* Expats taste buds may be different from Dominican ones. Take that into account.
 
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NanSanPedro

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Maybe this thread will become all things Norberi doesn't like. lol

Last video.

Today she uploaded a video about visiting the Da Nancy restaurant in Boca Chica. Several people told her it has the best fried fish in Boca Chica. Riiiight...

Dominicans like anything fried. Spending a lifetime of eating fried anything makes you sort of an expert of what is truly good fried anything and what isn't. So, if the fried fish didn't pass her Dominican taste buds test, this is serious.


Alright those of you that have tried many of the restaurants in Boca Chica, do you know Da Nancy? Agree with Norberis? What is the best restaurant in Boca Chica?

* Expats taste buds may be different from Dominican ones. Take that into account.
Fabry for pizza. Bon Bistro for cheeseburgers. Palmares for pasta. Barra Polo for sandwiches. Santo Domingo for steaks. I've only been to D'Nancys once and it was about a year ago. I don't remember it too well.
 

JD Jones

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Maybe this thread will become all things Norberi doesn't like. lol

Last video.

Today she uploaded a video about visiting the Da Nancy restaurant in Boca Chica. Several people told her it has the best fried fish in Boca Chica. Riiiight...

Dominicans like anything fried. Spending a lifetime of eating fried anything makes you sort of an expert of what is truly good fried anything and what isn't. So, if the fried fish didn't pass her Dominican taste buds test, this is serious.


Alright those of you that have tried many of the restaurants in Boca Chica, do you know Da Nancy? Agree with Norberis? What is the best restaurant in Boca Chica?

* Expats taste buds may be different from Dominican ones. Take that into account.
3things:

1. Wow, has Da"Nancy changed! It used to be a couple of tables under trees.

2. She always dresses like a cheap barrio girl.

3.Best fried fish I've had in BC has always been the women in the small stands who let you pick your fish, tell you how much it is before they fry it, then fry it in front of you. That's as good as it gets.
 
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Facepalm Supreme

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3things:

1. Wow, has Da"Nancy changed! It used to be a couple of tables under trees.

2. She always dresses like a cheap barrio girl.

3.Best fried fish I've had in BC has always been the women in the small stands who let you pick your fish, tell you how much it is before they fry it, then fry it in front of you. That's as good as it gets.


JD - In point #2 are you referring to Norberis?

Never ben to Da Nancy so I can't comment but I can't knock the video. If the fish came out 3-5 minutes after ordering (possibly an exaggeration) and/or it was soggy/wet/cold - well that is not how fried fish is supposed to be.

I never really ate a lot of fried fish until I came to the DR. I gotta say that a Fried Snapper with coconut sauce (Chillo Frito con salsa de coco) is one of my favorite meals in the entire country, along with a side of totstones. It's truly a shame for it to not be cooked fresh.
 

Big

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with so many other beach and dining options, why pray tell would anyone bring their family to B.C
 
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JD Jones

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JD - In point #2 are you referring to Norberis?

Never ben to Da Nancy so I can't comment but I can't knock the video. If the fish came out 3-5 minutes after ordering (possibly an exaggeration) and/or it was soggy/wet/cold - well that is not how fried fish is supposed to be.

I never really ate a lot of fried fish until I came to the DR. I gotta say that a Fried Snapper with coconut sauce (Chillo Frito con salsa de coco) is one of my favorite meals in the entire country, along with a side of totstones. It's truly a shame for it to not be cooked fresh.
Yes, Norberis.

She's right (and you are too) about the fish preparation.

Once again, the little stands make great fried fish, and a LOT cheaper.
 

Facepalm Supreme

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with so many other beach and dining options, why pray tell would anyone bring their family to B.C
Never been there but -

Closest beach to SD
Lots of people/popular spot (could be a bad or a good thing depending on how you view it)
One feature that I've heard that I would love to explore more is that apparently it is SUPER shallow for 50-100 yards out. Much safer than Juan Dolio or Cabarete. For this reason Bayahibe is my favorite beach, it's very calm and tranquil. I don't like the idea of being swept out to sea.


Many people, including Dominicans don't know the country in depth. So you're only going to hear "Punta Cana, Sosua, Boca Chica". People don't necessarily know about Barahona, or Juan Dolio, or Bayahibe, or Cabarete, etc until they start to learn the country a little more and many of those locations are much farther than BC is from Santo Domingo.

BC is also basically directly on top of the airport.
 
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dwightbz

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3things:

1. Wow, has Da"Nancy changed! It used to be a couple of tables under trees.

2. She always dresses like a cheap barrio girl.

3.Best fried fish I've had in BC has always been the women in the small stands who let you pick your fish, tell you how much it is before they fry it, then fry it in front of you. That's as good as it gets.
Was it necessary to comment on her appearance? She gave a critique of a restaurant and you felt the need to try and degrade her. As a moderator I thought t you would know how to stick to the topic.