Oh oh, Norberis is not happy about this...

keepcoming

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As a reader (not a mod) I like to see the reviewer in action. It's just me. I like it that way. His comment was not "degrading " as you took the time to say. BTW It's interesting that this is your one and only comment since joining our group in 2006. Dats, a lot of years. Your see, it's all about credibility. If she is wearing cheap barrio clothes, which it appears she is, that is part of my determining her credentials.OR, is the reviewer in this acting in a self serving manner. Cred again. Her cred. Your cred. One post since 2006 SMH. LOL. Have a bright, sunny day. I enjoyed thinking about your post and now will return to contemplating the lint in my navel.
There was nothing wrong with JD's post IMO. The poster "Dwightbz" makes their 1st post and then disappears, now that is suspicious. Johne summed it up well!!
 

RDKNIGHT

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does anyone have a phone number I would like to teach you how to speak English properly
 

Auryn

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Her clothes are actually on trend with styles within the past year- the ripped jeans in the first video and then the tie dye in the second. I think she’s just trying to be up on modern styles.

Neither are very conducive to being taken seriously, but they are/were on trend. A better choice would have been smarter.

I did not let her fashion sense distract me from giving her opinion the benefit of the doubt.

She still didn’t convince me, because cheating and multiple partners is a cultural norm here. Some are just more discreet than others, and fewer still don’t do it at all.
 
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Her real goal is probably not necessarily to review/inform as it is to get people talking (3 pages here) and then monetize her youtube channel for personal gain. She needs 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hour views in a year, then she can apply to be paid.

So the more sensational or controversial, whether accurate or not, helps get her to her goal.

All she likely really wants is for people to view and subscribe.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

Lucifer

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I've seen a few of her early videos, especially after she moved to the D.R. the first time (she returned for a second stint).
She has a couple of books out, and lends her knowledge of the D.R. to folks exploring the possibilities of moving there, for a fee, of course.

I would hope she has someone who writes and edits those books. I must confess I cringe when she rushes and/or omits certain words and phrases ("in Dominican Republic" vs. 'in the Dominican Republic' (slow down, Norberis. Relax. Enunciate).
 

RDKNIGHT

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Considering the fact that the majority of people here are not provided with opportunities for BASIC EDUCATION,

Considering the fact that there are more Cabañas than properly functioning educational facilities,

Infidelity may not be culturally accepted across the board, but it is a widely accepted norm here.

She presents a great argument, but she didn’t convince me.
wow I never thought about that more cabana's than Schools...
 

RDKNIGHT

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Maybe this thread will become all things Norberi doesn't like. lol

Last video.

Today she uploaded a video about visiting the Da Nancy restaurant in Boca Chica. Several people told her it has the best fried fish in Boca Chica. Riiiight...

Dominicans like anything fried. Spending a lifetime of eating fried anything makes you sort of an expert of what is truly good fried anything and what isn't. So, if the fried fish didn't pass her Dominican taste buds test, this is serious.


Alright those of you that have tried many of the restaurants in Boca Chica, do you know Da Nancy? Agree with Norberis? What is the best restaurant in Boca Chica?

* Expats taste buds may be different from Dominican ones. Take that into account.
Wow very honest .... I'll say it again what a beautiful beach they need to get rid of the Riff Raff place should be a gold mine not a dumping ground for Riff Raff
 

Auryn

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wow I never thought about that more cabana's than Schools...
Pay attention the next time you go from any point in this country to any other point, north, south, east, west, interior, coastal. Count the schools you see vs Cabañas.

I am sure they’re better maintained, better staffed, and better run.

This is why I call BS on Norberis. She rambles on about it all well and good but she is incorrect.
 

RDKNIGHT

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Pay attention the next time you go from any point in this country to any other point, north, south, east, west, interior, coastal. Count the schools you see vs Cabañas.

I am sure they’re better maintained, better staffed, and better run.

This is why I call BS on Norberis. She rambles on about it all well and good but she is incorrect.
I Don't think she has a high IQ
 
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bob saunders

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Pay attention the next time you go from any point in this country to any other point, north, south, east, west, interior, coastal. Count the schools you see vs Cabañas.

I am sure they’re better maintained, better staffed, and better run.

This is why I call BS on Norberis. She rambles on about it all well and good but she is incorrect.
Well there are only three cabanas touristicas in Jarabacoa, all three in Buena Vista area, but there are 8 private schools and more than twenty public schools so I guess what you say isnt true for the whole country. I have two single sons in their early 30s in Canada and one of them has sex with a number of married women on a regular basis, and I recall the availability when I was a single guy in my twenties so I doubt that Dominican society is really that much different than many other countries.
 
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Auryn

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Well there are only three cabanas touristicas in Jarabacoa, all three in Buena Vista area, but there are 8 private schools and more than twenty public schools so I guess what you say isnt true for the whole country. I have two single sons in their early 30s in Canada and one of them has sex with a number of married women on a regular basis, and I recall the availability when I was a single guy in my twenties so I doubt that Dominican society is really that much different than many other countries.
Of course cheating happens in Canada and everywhere else around the world.

This thread isn’t about that, it’s about cultural acceptance.

It’s more culturally accepted in the DR than Canada. No one said or implied that it doesn’t happen in Canada, but it’s not as much of a cultural norm as in the Dominican Republic.
 

terantius

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Gee I don't know. Maybe from decades of experience: living here, doing business here and in other countries.
In a country of 10 million+ people. You think you know 100 dominican's romantic relations and standards? And you're basing this on "traveling" to other countries? Lol. What you're saying can be taken as parody because of how irrational it is.
 

Facepalm Supreme

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In a country of 10 million+ people. You think you know 100 dominican's romantic relations and standards? And you're basing this on "traveling" to other countries? Lol. What you're saying can be taken as parody because of how irrational it is.
People are people. Different cultures have different habits.

It's well known that Dominican culture functions as Big and Auryn have stated.

There are physical signs and symptoms/indicators of this behavior. The very existence of the cabaña is one. Prostitution is legal on this island. It's well known that many guys, whatever their social class have a partner, a mistress and also other "romantic relationships" with random women.

It's the culture. Not exactly sure why you're trying to pretend like this doesn't exist and isn't well known about.
 

bob saunders

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People are people. Different cultures have different habits.

It's well known that Dominican culture functions as Big and Auryn have stated.

There are physical signs and symptoms/indicators of this behavior. The very existence of the cabaña is one. Prostitution is legal on this island. It's well known that many guys, whatever their social class have a partner, a mistress and also other "romantic relationships" with random women.

It's the culture. Not exactly sure why you're trying to pretend like this doesn't exist and isn't well known about.
In the not so recent past, and even today men had most of the power and money in relationships in the Dominican Republic. If you have never lived in poverty you have little understanding not to have to scrabble for food and shelter. This was the situation for most women in the DR so they put up with their husband or father of their children having other women. Culturally as catholics it was more than just frowned upon, but also divorce was almost impossible. Many of those conditions still exist for the uneducated poor women in the DR. So yes it is in the culture but not really accepted. I work with 40 plus Dominican women, some married and some single. Most of them would cut the balls off their guy if he was screwing around on them, and they certainly would end the relationship. Lots of divorces in the DR for this very reason.
 

Facepalm Supreme

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In the not so recent past, and even today men had most of the power and money in relationships in the Dominican Republic. If you have never lived in poverty you have little understanding not to have to scrabble for food and shelter. This was the situation for most women in the DR so they put up with their husband or father of their children having other women. Culturally as catholics it was more than just frowned upon, but also divorce was almost impossible. Many of those conditions still exist for the uneducated poor women in the DR. So yes it is in the culture but not really accepted. I work with 40 plus Dominican women, some married and some single. Most of them would cut the balls off their guy if he was screwing around on them, and they certainly would end the relationship. Lots of divorces in the DR for this very reason.

"Cut the balls off their guy"? Not fond of how that comes out. I know you are speaking metaphorically (for the most part) but if I said that a guy would "Cut the tits off of his woman" if she were having sex with other guys or acting coqueta -which is exactly how over 70% of Dominican women act when around a guy they are into, or just to go walking around the street wearing tight or revealing clothing -all of sudden we would need to have a "Domestic Violence" conversation that drags men through the mud.

NO one should be cutting anything off of anyone.

Back to the topic at hand - I've spoken amorously with over a thousand Dominican women. I agree with you that most do not see it as "ideal" that their guy be with other women. That said, the culture here specifically allows a man to be with multiple women "if he does it right", is the phrase that is commonly used. This includes not being seen in public places, not bringing home children or diseases, and not neglecting his responsibilities to the home, primarily the financial ones. When a man is 5'11 or 6'3 or 6'6 and he has a square jaw and he is fit or in shape, he is getting around, period. Even more so if he dresses professionally and/or has a job that brings in serious money. And the women that he is with know this, and they tolerate/accept it because they value being with him more than they do being the only one that is with him.

That said, I will agree with you that there are lots of guys who don't fit this caliber and are mujeriego and their women do (eventually) get fed up and leave them. I will also agree that in general it is a difficult thing for a Dominican woman to accept. That said, culturally it is widespread, common even, and not a secret. It happens, every day, amongst every social/economic class.

I don't want to keep having to rehash this conversation but I know it'll come up over and over again. Dominicans aren't living in the kind of "poverty" that requires them to "scrabble for food and shelter." And it's a really disingenuous statement to make. MAYBE 20-50 years ago, I don't know - I wasn't here and haven't done enough reading to say otherwise. MAYBE some of the Haitian population could be described as being in that situation currently. But how many indigent Dominicans do you know living in the forests and jungles of this country without a roof or on the streets sleeping on cardboard? Eating once every 2-3 days? And then how many 18-25 year old girls do you know with Iphone 12s and 13s? 30-40 year old women going back and forth to western union collecting more money monthly than you do with your job at the school? Guys who are connected receiving remittances (through women that they set up as mules) from different black and gray market channels? Maybe people are confusing the Dominican Republic with Cuba, or maybe you are just comparing this Island and it's people, which has it's pros and cons to the most economically powerful nations on earth - the USA, Canada and those in Europe? Apples to oranges. All you need to do is walk inside a PriceSmart or Jumbo and see Dominicans every day all day walking out with big screen TVs and stereo systems and carts full of items to dispell this ridiculous myth. This country ain't in poverty, not by a long shot. Also, a lot of the conditions that a 1st worlder would consider as immediate "Poverty status" aren't seen the same way here. A zinc roof, no electric, or electric borrowed from neighbors, living a ways from the nearest city, living on streets that are absolutely filthy and/or where there is lots of barrio noise, living amongst individuals or being an individual that doesn't have a formal education, etc. etc. These are not indicators of poverty, as much as they are conflating contemporary "Western" standards of living to other countries. The DR is in a rapid period of growth/development and it's normal to have infrastructural challenges when a country is rapidly developing. Think the late 1800s, early 1900s in the USA.

The people are well fed (overly so) with extremely fresh and non processed food (and processed foods are of course available as well), mostly everyone has a home or two or three they can be in, though it may be living with an aunt or uncle or a brother or sister, and for those who want it a job is not a difficult thing to find.

Bob - when I took the Ruta Panoramica from PoP to Santo Domingo I saw 3-4 of those "party busses" - old yellow schoolbusses fitted with lights and speakers, full of (lower class) Dominicans getting drunk and grooving out doing turismo interno. You ever seen them? Does that seem congruent with a country in which there are a significant number of people "Scrabbling for food and shelter"?
 
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Facepalm Supreme

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Coincidentally there is a "Dominican Republic Economy 2022" thread that was recently posted. I'll post the stats from that -

The Central Bank of the Dominican Republic on January 31, 2023 published a resumed report of the Dominican economy in 2022.

In essence:

  • 2022 Economic Growth: 4.9%
  • Nominal GDP: US$114 billion
  • Formal and Informal Employees: 4.77 million
  • Open Unemployment: 4.8%
  • Inflation: 7.83%
  • International Reserves: US$14.4 billion or 12.8% of GDP
  • Foreign Hard Currency: US$39 billion
  • Export Growth: 10.5%
  • Tourism: US$8.4 billion
  • Remittances: US$9.9 billion
  • Direct Foreign Investments: US$3.8 billion
  • Dominican Peso: appreciation of 2%.
The tables and graphs shown (in the order they appear).


5% GDP growth - an extremely healthy number
5% open unemployment - a remarkable figure.
Inflation - 7.8% - I don't like the number but it's more or less in line with the rest of the western world right now.
8.5 billion coming in from tourism (ON THE BOOKS ONLY, actual figure obviously higher), 10 billion coming in from remittances (On the books only, actual figure obviously higher)


I won't bother with the other numbers because they don't affect the common person nearly as much.


DR is arguably the richest and most comfortable country for a poor person south of the USA in this hemisphere. I'm not familiar with how the poor live in Argentina, Chile, Paraguay or Uruguay but it's hard to argue that a poor person in DR isn't WAY better off than one in Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, or any of the other Caribbean countries.
 
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NALs

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