Pero o Sino?

NanSanPedro

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The following is from Spanish Dict:
https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-conjunctions
Pero, Sino, and Mas
These three conjunctions can all be translated as but, but they're not interchangeable.

Pero and Mas
Pero and mas mean but and are used to contrast two statements. However, mas is considered to be more literary, and is something you're much more likely to see in formal writing.

EXAMPLES
Quieren viajar a Costa Rica, pero no tienen suficiente dinero.
They want to travel to Costa Rica, but they don’t have enough money.

Soy joven, mas no soy ingenuo.
I'm young, but I'm not naïve.

Sino
Sino also means but, but is used to introduce an affirmation that contrasts a previous negative statement.

EXAMPLES
Mi hermano no es alto, sino bajo.
My brother isn’t tall, but short.

No vine a escuchar, sino a cantar.
I didn’t come to listen, but to sing.

I don't think I've ever heard anything but "pero" for but here. I'm sure they're correct but this may not be used in the DR. Does anyone better versed in Spanish know if mas and sino are used here?

Thanks!
 
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JD Jones

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Gadfly

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I speak decent Spanish but fast talkin w/strong accent cutting & chopping the words loses me. I always thought sino meant “if not” but now know two meanings! Lurned somtin’ new taday ma
 
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NALs

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The following is from Spanish Dict:
https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-conjunctions


I don't think I've ever heard anything but "pero" for but here. I'm sure they're correct but this may not be used in the DR. Does anyone better versed in Spanish know if mas and sino are used here?

Thanks!
As with everything, it depends on the people you surround yourself. I can guarantee you that you hear china for oranges in SD/Boca Chica while in Santiago basically no one calls it china, it's naranja. The same in Puerto Plata, La Vega, pretty much everywhere in the north.

They call it china in Puerto Rico too, but over there it's on the entire island.

This may be one of those Puerto Rican influences that spread in the DR, because there was a small immigration of Puerto Ricans from the 1890's to the 1920's +/- and the bulk of them settled in places like Santo Domingo, San Pedro de Macorís, La Romana, Barahona... Is it coincidence that in the places where china is said for naranjas in the DR happen to be areas that received the Puerto Ricans?
 
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Marianopolita

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The following is from Spanish Dict:
https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-conjunctions


I don't think I've ever heard anything but "pero" for but here. I'm sure they're correct but this may not be used in the DR. Does anyone better versed in Spanish know if mas and sino are used here?

Thanks!

I don’t think it is a question of whether más or sino are used in the DR. These are Spanish language grammar points regardless where they are used. I agree más is not heard as much in general (not referring specifically to the DR) to mean but. However, sino should be heard in the spoken language.
As well, you need to note the difference between sino and si no.

This is where it’s interesting when you read social media posts- Instagram, Twitter etc. although the writing rules are very relaxed (almost not applicable) I am convinced many people of all ages do not know how to write in Spanish. They do not even know the basics. Here is an example: Ay vs. Hay. The majority do not know the difference. So asking people to know sino vs. si no may be asking for a miracle. Also, I see very often: es una bergüenza….:oops:This shows people have no clue how the language works phonetically.
 

Marianopolita

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I speak decent Spanish but fast talkin w/strong accent cutting & chopping the words loses me. I always thought sino meant “if not” but now know two meanings! Lurned somtin’ new taday ma

If not = si no

But= sino after a negative statement….as a contrast. This is very common in Spanish. A very basic grammar point.
 

Lucifer

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I don’t think it is a question of whether más or sino are used in the DR. These are Spanish language grammar points regardless where they are used. I agree más is not heard as much in general (not referring specifically to the DR) to mean but. However, sino should be heard in the spoken language.
As well, you need to note the difference between sino and si no.

This is where it’s interesting when you read social media posts- Instagram, Twitter etc. although the writing rules are very relaxed (almost not applicable) I am convinced many people of all ages do not know how to write in Spanish. They do not even know the basics. Here is an example: Ay vs. Hay. The majority do not know the difference. So asking people to know sino vs. si no may be asking for a miracle. Also, I see very often: es una bergüenza….:oops:This shows people have no clue how the language works phonetically.
¡Ay! Ahí si hay.
 
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Marianopolita

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¡Ay! Ahí si hay.

Yes….it is scary when you read a post in Spanish on Instagram. It is not a question if there will be an error rather when it will come up in the sentence (BTW- this sentence is the same construction in English referring to Nan’s post about sino in Spanish).
 
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Lucifer

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Yes….it is scary when you read a post in Spanish on Instagram. It is not a question if there will be an error rather when it will come up in the sentence (BTW- this sentence is the same construction in English referring to Nan’s post about sino in Spanish).
Yes, indeed! Scary and disappointing.

I regularly receive messages from folks in the D.R., some of whom are college graduates and professionals and, with NO exceptions, every message is replete with errors.
 
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AlterEgo

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Yes, indeed! Scary and disappointing.

I regularly receive messages from folks in the D.R., some of whom are college graduates and professionals and, with NO exceptions, every message is replete with errors.
You sound like Mr AE, he’s always saying the same. His mother was a teacher who specialized in reading and writing. (What do they call that? Something like “alfabetization”. )
 
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JD Jones

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Yes, indeed! Scary and disappointing.

I regularly receive messages from folks in the D.R., some of whom are college graduates and professionals and, with NO exceptions, every message is replete with errors.
So common here I didn't even think to mention it. Second place: The folks who don't know what's on their curriculum.
 
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Lucifer

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A casual perusal of Dominican newspapers online
You sound like Mr AE, he’s always saying the same. His mother was a teacher who specialized in reading and writing. (What do they call that? Something like “alfabetization”. )
Absolutely!
I was raised by my grandmother in Higüey. She had a 3rd-grade education, and learned how to read with a reading book called "Mantilla."
She pronounced everything correctly, and on occasions, corrected our mistakes:

<<No, Joseito, no se dice 'igualito'; se dice 'parecido'>>.
<<Pero, mi hijo, la palabra 'casimente' no existe. No digas eso>>.
 
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Marianopolita

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Yes, indeed! Scary and disappointing.

I regularly receive messages from folks in the D.R., some of whom are college graduates and professionals and, with NO exceptions, every message is replete with errors.

Yes, I totally agree and brace myself for the mess. The DR is one of the countries that leads in illiteracy in Latin America and has a very poor public education system. To expect more from the average person is not realistic. I think it’s a shame when speaking to many adults knowing that if they had to write what they say it would be disastrous! However, so is their speech. Let’s be honest the Dominican vernacular will challenge many to write properly even if they do have a good solid educational foundation in Spanish.

What’s mind boggling too is Spanish is the official language of the country. If one can’t write properly in the official language then how can you progress in life or move the country forward if the average person is semi-illiterate?

This problem has been going for a long time though because I know Dominican seniors in the DR age sixty and over who are completely illiterate. They speak, of course but can read and write. This is not uncommon. Actually, it’s quite prevalent.
 
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Lucifer

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The pedantic in me never fails to find errors in Dominican newspapers: from misplaced commas to run-on sentences and other errors.

From today's Listin Diario:

<<La República Dominicana ha logrado este viernes en Honduras lo nunca antes. Clasificar a un equipo de fútbol a los Juegos Olímpicos>>.

I would've placed a colon after 'antes'.
 

NanSanPedro

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Nan what’s the name again of the app you are using to learn Spanish?
I use SpanishDict primarily. https://www.spanishdict.com/guide

I go thru all the grammar and have my own vocab list. As a secondary help, I use 123teachme for paragraph comprehension. This is where I'm at currently: https://www.123teachme.com/learn_spanish/interpretive_reading_intermediate_mid_21/#!/2

I also have a daily feed from
Listín Diario

I try to read one article of interest in Spanish a day.
 

Marianopolita

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The pedantic in me never fails to find errors in Dominican newspapers: from misplaced commas to run-on sentences and other errors.

From today's Listin Diario:

<<La República Dominicana ha logrado este viernes en Honduras lo nunca antes. Clasificar a un equipo de fútbol a los Juegos Olímpicos>>.

I would've placed a colon after 'antes'.

I am not as picky with commas because even in my own writing I miss them or make errors but on a message board that’s to be expected. Even after proof reading it’s hard because we have five minutes to edit a post which is ridiculous but life goes on.

I understand your point though. A few weeks ago, I saw an article in Listín Diario and it was the first time that I could recall seeing so many errors. I was so tempted to send it to you.

You’re right though that sentence is flawed because of the period after antes.
 
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Lucifer

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From today's Diario Libre:

<<Vladimir Guerrero Jr. tomó un rol protagónico en el pleito que se desató en la tercera entrada del partido ante los Medias Rojas este miércoles, cuando el abridor del conjunto de Boston, Nick Pivetta golpeó al receptor de Toronto, Alejandro Kirk con una recta>>.

In the case of Dominican newspapers, I draw the line. Where are the editors?
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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I use SpanishDict primarily. https://www.spanishdict.com/guide

I go thru all the grammar and have my own vocab list. As a secondary help, I use 123teachme for paragraph comprehension. This is where I'm at currently: https://www.123teachme.com/learn_spanish/interpretive_reading_intermediate_mid_21/#!/2

I also have a daily feed from
Listín Diario

I try to read one article of interest in Spanish a day.


This is good and both those websites are good resources. Reading the newspaper keeps your language learning real because you must get exposure to all facets of the language. 123teachme has a lot of interactive practice exercises.

Was pero vs sino one of the grammar lessons?