Police Killed and stations over run

mountainannie

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From the above article -
Dans son rapport devant le Conseil de sécurité sur Haïti le 11 juin dernier, le secrétaire général de l'ONU a déclaré : «La situation des droits humains s’est encore détériorée en raison de l’incapacité persistante des pouvoirs publics à protéger la population contre la violence des bandes armées et de l’absence de volonté persistante et chronique de s’attaquer efficacement aux violations sous-jacentes et structurelles des droits humains, notamment dans les lieux de détention. Depuis mon précédent rapport, aucune mesure efficace n’a été prise pour établir les responsabilités dans un nombre croissant d’affaires emblématiques, notamment les meurtres de Grand-Ravine (2017), de La Saline (2018) et de Bel-Air (2019) ainsi que l’assassinat de Monferrier Dorval en août 2020».
Google translate
In his report to the Security Council on Haiti on June 11, the UN Secretary General said: “The human rights situation has deteriorated further due to the continued inability of the government to protect the population. against armed gang violence and the persistent and chronic unwillingness to effectively tackle underlying and structural human rights violations, especially in places of detention. Since my previous report, no effective action has been taken to establish accountability in a growing number of emblematic cases, including the murders of Grand-Ravine (2017), La Saline (2018) and Bel-Air (2019). ) as well as the assassination of Monferrier Dorval in August 2020 ”.
 

mountainannie

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Note that Twitter has an automate Google translate function

from the head of the electric company
3/3 L '#EdH recalls that the attackers have been occupying the Péligre power plant since yesterday with the complicity of security agents responsible for protecting staff and equipment. No decision is taken by the authorities to dislodge them and arrest them for legal consequences.

 

mountainannie

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I sent this over to the "folks" in Haiti with the counsel that they ought to really look at these stats VERY Carefully.. since
clearly
if the population trend continues like this
with more and more children - and more and more educated persons leaving - etc
People here question me about COVID in Haiti? Which has gotten some press here. But look? there are so very few people over 65? As I said to them - COVID is the LEAST of their problems

 

NALs

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Why anyone who lives on a small island would wish that their neighbors, 5 hours away, should descend into chaos?

The wish part is debatable, but has Haiti ever been much further away from the DR? Last I checked, the island hasn't been growing for thousand of years and this isn't the first time Haiti goes through political instability and the DR continues like nothing is happening (during the civil war of 1965, Port-au-Prince knew that Santo Domingo was in turmoil because i]of the newspapers, otherwise things continued as calm as the day before). The same can't be said in say Phillipsburg, people in al, of St Martin doesn't needs the media to know something is up on the island. That's a true small island. To put it another way, if it was as small as some think, Santo Domingo wouldn't be much different from Port-au-Prince. You of all people know that living in Port-au-Prince and living in Santo Domingo is very different.

Notice how the DR gets bigger the further north it's placed on the map.

 

NALs

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LMAO, trying to sell his books. Seems like a nice enough guy. Thank goodness he has the USA to protect his typical bleeding heart liberal views. "SIPA" an absolute meaningless curriculum.
At least he has nice hair. Not everyone can have gray hair and not have it dominate the look. lol
 
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mountainannie

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The wish part is debatable, but has Haiti ever been much further away from the DR? Last I checked, the island hasn't been growing for thousand of years and this isn't the first time Haiti goes through political instability and the DR continues like nothing is happening (during the civil war of 1965, Port-au-Prince knew that Santo Domingo was in turmoil because i]of the newspapers, otherwise things continued as calm as the day before). The same can't be said in say Phillipsburg, people in al, of St Martin doesn't needs the media to know something is up on the island. That's a true small island. To put it another way, if it was as small as some think, Santo Domingo wouldn't be much different from Port-au-Prince. You of all people know that living in Port-au-Prince and living in Santo Domingo is very different.

Notice how the DR gets bigger the further north it's placed on the map.

A friend of mine here commented that "it is such a small island" - and I said - "No - it is the size of Vermont & New Hampshire combined" - I lived in Grenada - which you can circumnavigate in about 3 hours - although going "up mountain" will lead to lots of adventures-- and - you could not actually go UP on the days that the banana trucks were schedule to come down! And then Puerto Rico - which you can pretty much drive around in a day- But ditto the mountains. I live in the DR for 14 years and travelled around it more than most folks - but there were still areas that I wish I had seen. Hispaniola is an huge island.
 

mountainannie

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What is certain more and more by the day is that Toussaint had wisdom and lots of prescience in his not wanting to declare independence. This one is meaningless if your country to be isn't capable/competent enough to maintain it.
NS- The US (which is only 15 yr. older than Haiti) certainly had an advantage in that it had many more literate and wealthy colonists.

But you know as well as I do that Haiti had VERY unique issues in obtaining its indolence - such as a trade blockage and the indemnity that it had to pay to France right up to 1947, (NO other colony in the world had to PAY for its independence - and the $$ was to pay for the loss of the value of the slaves - it is estimated now as $40B and certainly when Haiti claims that France OWES them that - I would suggest that a just court would agree - The US, of course, was completely complicit - seizing the treasury in order to extract the payments.

and the colorist class divisions where the mixed race children of French planters/slaves were often better educated - and then formed their own "class? - if you listen to Michael's talk through -you will hear him speak of how so many Haitians who consider themselves "white" in Haiti, come to the US to discover that they are considered "black" -- (I heard from Puerto Rican friends that they did not know what racism WAS until they moved to the USA!)

In my liberal Quaker school, I learned some peculiar things - such as "you can not have a democracy without an educated electorate" (Another I remember is "What is the first thing you do when you invade a nation and wish to take control?" --"Get control of the airwaves"

There have been times in Haitians history where "things" could have gone otherwise. But there was always a class who wanted the peasantry to remain just that.. so that they had a structured class system.

You will note, of course, from what is going on now in the United States, that a literate population is not enough - the airwaves are far more important.

Much as there is plenty to blame Haitians themselves about -(and I do!)
They did not get to where they are without a whole lot of help from the outside world.