US tourist visa for Dominicans - can the applicant be accompanied inside the embassy?

tee

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Hi all,
Question, if an Dominican adult is applying for a US tourist visa in Santo Domingo can that person be accompanied her husband even if the husband is not applying for a tourist visa? I was told that the people applying for a visa had to go to the interview alone but I have since learned that this may not be the case.
Here is the scenario. Firstly, I am Canadian, not Dominican. My Dominican wife and adult step daughter just had their 'interview' at the embassy for a tourist visa. They did not ask my stepdaughter any questions and the only questions that they asked my wife was about me. According to her she answered all the questions correctly in regards to me. We supplied them with bank accounts showing more than enough means for funds and many other support documents but they were subsequently denied a visa. No big deal, this happens all the time and we will try again next year. But my question is would I have been able to attend the interview with them? This could have made a difference and if it is possible that I can attend then I would certainly do that next time.
Anyone who has had any experience in this please could you respond....not interested in theories, just people that have had actual experience. I am only referring to a tourist visa.
Many thanks
 
Jan 9, 2004
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Hi all,
Question, if an Dominican adult is applying for a US tourist visa in Santo Domingo can that person be accompanied her husband even if the husband is not applying for a tourist visa? I was told that the people applying for a visa had to go to the interview alone but I have since learned that this may not be the case.
Here is the scenario. Firstly, I am Canadian, not Dominican. My Dominican wife and adult step daughter just had their 'interview' at the embassy for a tourist visa. They did not ask my stepdaughter any questions and the only questions that they asked my wife was about me. According to her she answered all the questions correctly in regards to me. We supplied them with bank accounts showing more than enough means for funds and many other support documents but they were subsequently denied a visa. No big deal, this happens all the time and we will try again next year. But my question is would I have been able to attend the interview with them? This could have made a difference and if it is possible that I can attend then I would certainly do that next time.
Anyone who has had any experience in this please could you respond....not interested in theories, just people that have had actual experience. I am only referring to a tourist visa.
Many thanks

For a tourist visa to the US…….

No….but there are exceptions for a minor or someone who needs an interpreter.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 
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Jan 9, 2004
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With the record amount of Dominicans that arrive at the airports in wheelchairs, maybe I can get away with wheeling them both into the embassy!!!:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
I am afraid that the answer will still be the same.

One question likely pondered by the staff person is why she/they have not obtained Canadian residency since you indicate you are a married to her and you are a Canadian citizen.

There is often times no rhyme or reason to approvals/disapprovals...............but they generally have a pre-conceived decision based on many factors and including the documents you supplied prior to the interview...........and at the time of the interview it is the job of the applicant to try to overcome that bias.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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Hi all,
Question, if an Dominican adult is applying for a US tourist visa in Santo Domingo can that person be accompanied her husband even if the husband is not applying for a tourist visa? I was told that the people applying for a visa had to go to the interview alone but I have since learned that this may not be the case.
Here is the scenario. Firstly, I am Canadian, not Dominican. My Dominican wife and adult step daughter just had their 'interview' at the embassy for a tourist visa. They did not ask my stepdaughter any questions and the only questions that they asked my wife was about me. According to her she answered all the questions correctly in regards to me. We supplied them with bank accounts showing more than enough means for funds and many other support documents but they were subsequently denied a visa. No big deal, this happens all the time and we will try again next year. But my question is would I have been able to attend the interview with them? This could have made a difference and if it is possible that I can attend then I would certainly do that next time.
Anyone who has had any experience in this please could you respond....not interested in theories, just people that have had actual experience. I am only referring to a tourist visa.
Many thanks
Yes. Recently they started allowing other people in, even if they weren't a part of the application. A few months ago, I had a couple applying for a visa for her child. At the consulate they were told that only one of the parents could go in. A couple of months after that, I had clients with the same situation, and they let both parents in. Same thing with partners.
 
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Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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Hi all,
We supplied them with bank accounts showing more than enough means for funds and many other support documents, but they were subsequently denied a visa. No big deal, this happens all the time and we will try again next year.
Having a bank account with lots of money is not that important anymore. At least not for US tourist visas.
 
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CristoRey

Welcome To Wonderland
Apr 1, 2014
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Having a bank account with lots of money is not that important anymore. At least not for US tourist visas.
It's not that important anymore for anyone.
As a matter of fact they will actually pay you just for showing up and provide you with a free cell phone.
 
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Can you tell us what IS important these days?

Unfortunately for many, the ultimate determining factor is totally subjective.

You do need funds in a sufficient amount to be shown for the duration of your stay (talk about subjective)..................unless as was the case in the last two visa applications I prepared, the two UASD girls (minors) were attending a volleyball instruction camp in the US with all expenses covered by various foundations.

That was in July and only one parent for each was allowed into the interview.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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With the record amount of Dominicans that arrive at the airports in wheelchairs, maybe I can get away with wheeling them both into the embassy!!!:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
Bring some crutches and get a doc to put on some fake casts. You might pull it off!!!
 

Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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It's not that important anymore for anyone.
As a matter of fact they will actually pay you just for showing up and provide you with a free cell phone.
LOL I`m serious. Most applicants are not asked to show proof of funds. I once had a client with a just few thousand pesos in her bank account. She got the visa. I had another one who couldn´t even get to open a bank account ´cause he had a credit card mess. He also got a visa. If you think you´re getting a visa just for what you have in the bank, you´re doomed. Things are different for visa applications for other countries, though.
 
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cavok

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No, you are not allowed to attend. You're not even allowed to wait outside the embassy.
You have to wait about a block away up on a hill. Since you can't bring a cell phone in the embassy, bring your binoculars so you can spot your friend or SO coming out.
 

cavok

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LOL I`m serious. Most applicants are not asked to show proof of funds. I once had a client with a just few thousand pesos in her bank account. She got the visa. I had another one who couldn´t even get to open a bank account ´cause he had a credit card mess. He also got a visa. If you think you´re getting a visa just for what you have in the bank, you´re doomed. Things are different for visa applications for other countries, though.
Ok. So, in your opinion, what did the applicant have that convinced the immigration officer to give her the visa?
 
Aug 21, 2007
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I believe it also depends on the quotas of visas given prior to your interview. If the quota for that month is met, you go through the process, but from the moment you enter the door, they know you will be denied. Look up on Google visas provided monthly, yearly for each country. Like buying an airplane ticket, it pays to know the right day or time of month. I am no expert. But from what I have read, this is what I know.
 
Jan 9, 2004
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I believe it also depends on the quotas of visas given prior to your interview. If the quota for that month is met, you go through the process, but from the moment you enter the door, they know you will be denied. Look up on Google visas provided monthly, yearly for each country. Like buying an airplane ticket, it pays to know the right day or time of month. I am no expert. But from what I have read, this is what I know.

The quotas are generally for immigration visa classes.

That having been said, the consulate likely unofficially throttles back tourist visas if they feel they have issued in their opinion too many.

The DR currently issues approximately 200 tourist visas per week……a huge increase from ten short years ago. Much has to do with the current economy and the rise of the middle class.

That increase and expansion of the economy has led to a decline in people overstaying their tourist visas…….which has led to more tourist visas being approved……as they do have a reason(s) to return home.

Not to be outdone is the huge surge of Dominicans with citizenship or green card status in the US now applying for immigration visas for family members. Those numbers have grown exponentially, increasing wait times due to quotas and preferences.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2