US tourist visa for Dominicans - can the applicant be accompanied inside the embassy?

Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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Ok. So, in your opinion, what did the applicant have that convinced the immigration officer to give her the visa?
She had a job at a government institution and had worked there for over five years, her salary was above minimum wage, had a husband and minor kids. Her form information was thorough and logical, but must importantly, she made a good impression on the consul.
 
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Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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Can you tell us what IS important these days?
The information on your application, your job or business, how much you make, work history, type of work, what ties you to the DR, what your partner does and how much he or she makes, relatives in the U.S., if any of them could file a petition for you, your purpose of travel, if you have criminal records, if your partner has a tourist visa, etc. If you don't have kids or a partner, is your job or business enough to make you stay here?, how have people with a similar profile like you used their visas in the past?
Most importantly, you need to have a convincing interview.
 

cavok

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She had a job at a government institution and had worked there for over five years, her salary was above minimum wage, had a husband and minor kids. Her form information was thorough and logical, but must importantly, she made a good impression on the consul.
No doubt a good impression is important, but what really mattered was that she had a government job(confirmable employment) and also had a husband and kids to return to which means she also had a house.
 

windeguy

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Jul 10, 2004
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Hi all,
Question, if an Dominican adult is applying for a US tourist visa in Santo Domingo can that person be accompanied her husband even if the husband is not applying for a tourist visa? I was told that the people applying for a visa had to go to the interview alone but I have since learned that this may not be the case.
Here is the scenario. Firstly, I am Canadian, not Dominican. My Dominican wife and adult step daughter just had their 'interview' at the embassy for a tourist visa. They did not ask my stepdaughter any questions and the only questions that they asked my wife was about me. According to her she answered all the questions correctly in regards to me. We supplied them with bank accounts showing more than enough means for funds and many other support documents but they were subsequently denied a visa. No big deal, this happens all the time and we will try again next year. But my question is would I have been able to attend the interview with them? This could have made a difference and if it is possible that I can attend then I would certainly do that next time.
Anyone who has had any experience in this please could you respond....not interested in theories, just people that have had actual experience. I am only referring to a tourist visa.
Many thanks
If you were a US citizen applying for a US visitor's visa for your wife, your chances would be close to zero.
I was told that personally by US embassy staff at a meeting at Sea Horse Ranch.
Hopefully as a Canadian, you have a better chance.

As other's point out, you have no impact on the decision other than questions they might ask about you.
If you are living in the DR as a legal resident with her, that might be beneficial.
 
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USA DOC

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If you were a US citizen applying for a US visitor's visa for your wife, your chances would be close to zero.
I was told that personally by US embassy staff at a meeting at Sea Horse Ranch.
Hopefully as a Canadian, you have a better chance.

As other's point out, you have no impact on the decision other than questions they might ask about you.
If you are living in the DR as a legal resident with her, that might be beneficial.
thats the opposite of what happened to me.....being a American is the reason she got her visa.............
 

Manuel01

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Apr 1, 2009
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Can you tell us what IS important these days?
The "Nose of the Applicant" and i'm not kidding. The Person that attends your Case (Interview) is the one that will decide. I know medics with cars and real estate with the same employement for several years that got refused and i know prostitutes that never even had a bank account that got their Visa. You NEVER KNOW !
 

JD Jones

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Jan 7, 2016
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The "Nose of the Applicant" and i'm not kidding. The Person that attends your Case (Interview) is the one that will decide. I know medics with cars and real estate with the same employement for several years that got refused and i know prostitutes that never even had a bank account that got their Visa. You NEVER KNOW !
^This^
 

Radical

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It's not the "nose of the applicant" that matters, it's the "nose of the immigration officer" that matters.

That applies to very much everything in life; the person you are dealing with and the impression they make out of you would render the final treatment one gets from that person.

If that person believes you, likes you, either or both - the outcome would be positive
 

keepcoming

Moderator - Living & General Stuff
May 25, 2011
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I have said this before, IMO it is hit or miss. I have known people who I thought were absolutely qualified for a visa and they got denied. I have known people who I thought would never be approved but yet they were. The decision for the most part is up to the immigration adjudication officer. I do know one of the determining factors is whether the officer thinks there is a risk you may not return to your home country (DR). We know someone who worked with immigration for years. They said that sometimes the person who is "overqualified" are the ones you worry won't come back.
 
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windeguy

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thats the opposite of what happened to me.....being a American is the reason she got her visa.............
Then things changed dramatically on that since I tried 3 times and she was refused each time starting about 15 years ago. I was flat out told it was virtually impossible by staff from the embassy for the spouse of a US citizen to get a tourist visa. A green card was no problem.
 

windeguy

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I have said this before, IMO it is hit or miss. I have known people who I thought were absolutely qualified for a visa and they got denied. I have known people who I thought would never be approved but yet they were. The decision for the most part is up to the immigration adjudication officer. I do know one of the determining factors is whether the officer thinks there is a risk you may not return to your home country (DR). We know someone who worked with immigration for years. They said that sometimes the person who is "overqualified" are the ones you worry won't come back.
For the average Dominican, yes. Some get lucky.
 

cavok

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I have said this before, IMO it is hit or miss. I have known people who I thought were absolutely qualified for a visa and they got denied. I have known people who I thought would never be approved but yet they were. The decision for the most part is up to the immigration adjudication officer. I do know one of the determining factors is whether the officer thinks there is a risk you may not return to your home country (DR). We know someone who worked with immigration for years. They said that sometimes the person who is "overqualified" are the ones you worry won't come back.
That is the major, overall guiding factor in the immigration officer's decision in issuing a visa. Some Dominicans just get lucky. Maybe they're running short on meeting the quota for the month(?). With 7 million illegally crossing the southern border, what difference does it make if Belkis from the barrio gets a visa?
 
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windeguy

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That is the major, overall guiding factor in the immigration officer's decision in issuing a visa. Some Dominicans just get lucky. Maybe they're running short on meeting the quota for the month(?). With 7 million illegally crossing the southern border, what difference does it make if Belkis from the barrio gets a visa?
Ridiculous, but true at this time.
 
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USA DOC

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Then things changed dramatically on that since I tried 3 times and she was refused each time starting about 15 years ago. I was flat out told it was virtually impossible by staff from the embassy for the spouse of a US citizen to get a tourist visa. A green card was no problem.
mine got hers ...first try