El español dominicano

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Geografía en la calle

Here is a geography quiz by Carlos Durán.






The questions are easy, simple and most could not answer. What language do they speak in Spain? The Panama Canal is in what country? Really?


Estas preguntas no son tan difíciles. Bueno, yo estaba sorprendida que algunas personas no pudieran contestar.


**Also note these are Dominicans being asked these questions. Observe the different speech patterns.



-MP.
 
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bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
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[video]https://duckduckgo.com/?q=jay+leno+geografy+street+quiz&atb=v62-7__&iax=videos&ia=videos&iai=08O5kOqvm7E[/video]

just to even things out
 

Marianopolita

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Here is a glance at the Phonetics of the Dominican Republic. The video shows examples by region: the North (el Cibao), the East, the Capital and the South.


Note- there is a typo in the beginning of the video. The example for the pronunciation of negocio should be este negocio.









-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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Another typo is respecte, instead of respete.

Yes, I see that.


Do you think this could be a flaw typical of a foreign language resource? Mind you the research, info, and examples are great and represent the topic at hand but I find it hard to believe that they did not catch their own mistake esta negocio. Respete and Respecte could be the spell checker. It changes the word and sometimes you don’t realize it.



I like how they defined the linguistic zones and the examples are on point. The general phonetic observation can apply across the Caribbean for sure. The DR definitely has a distinct intonation that makes the accent easy to recognize.




-MP.
 

2dlight

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Jun 3, 2004
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I agree about the linguistic zones and I encounter examples of each living in the
Colonial Zone and interacting with people in the street. I've noticed the improper use of respeto and respecto in print often so it could be spell-check or writer not aware of the difference.
 

Marianopolita

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Here is one more. I like this compilation too. It is a short list but it gives some common words and expressions typical of the DR.


I like the summary on the speech patterns el cibaeño and regional variations.





Note- Cocotaso is incorrect. The correct spelling is CocotAZO. Unfortunately, this is a common error all over the web. People don't know the correct spelling of suffixes. In this case it is the augmentative -AZO.




Here is the link:

https://excursionespuntacana.com/blog/aqui-se-habla-dominicano/




-MP.
 
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Dr_Taylor

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Oct 18, 2017
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I agree about the linguistic zones and I encounter examples of each living in the
Colonial Zone and interacting with people in the street. I've noticed the improper use of respeto and respecto in print often so it could be spell-check or writer not aware of the difference.
It could be nothing more than sloppiness. Such is not limited to the DR by any means. You should see some of the text messages that I receive from folk here.
 

Marianopolita

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Diccionario dominicano

Here is a revamped version of Colonial Tour’s website and it has an easier to read list of Dominican words and expressions.


The explanations with examples are helpful. If you always wondered what a word or expression meant it may be on the list.


https://www.colonialtours.com/diccionario.htm



-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Telemundo 47....noticiero

Here is another nice find. This is a list of Dominican words and expressions compiled by Telemundo 47.

Telemundo is one of the largest Spanish television networks in the US with local stations across the country. Telemundo 47 broadcasts from New York City and with a Dominican connection. A few of the journalists are Dominican. The ones I know and knew are Alfredo Acosta (current) and Isolda Peguero was a long standing journalist who is no longer with Telemundo. She was good. There are others.


Given the large Dominican community in the greater New York area it is not surprising that Telemundo 47 put together a list of Dominicanisms. Out of the many Spanish-speaking communities the Dominican community is sizeable.

Thanks to the internet one can watch the news from around the world. Whenever I have a chance I watch the news on the internet either Telemundo 47 (NYC) or Telemundo 51 (Miami).


If you want to tune in here is the link:

https://www.telemundo47.com/noticia...oticiero-telemundo-47-11-1135-pm-nuevo/75386/


The link works only when there is a broadcast. For example, at noon and 11pm.


Dictionary of words and phrases:


https://www.telemundo47.com/noticia...-dominicanos-el-diccionario-dominicano/71267/


-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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Thanks for posting that video. I have not seen her before. I will go to her Instagram as she suggested.


Even from listening to this short video I think she has a good command of both languages. A balanced bilingual speaker. I think she provided an excellent break down of what was said. Those who are not familiar with Dominican or even Caribbean Spanish would find the Dominican speaker in the video difficult to understand.


Super!


-MP.
 

alexw

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Sep 6, 2008
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NYC-SDQ BABY!
Thanks for posting that video. I have not seen her before. I will go to her Instagram as she suggested.


Even from listening to this short video I think she has a good command of both languages. A balanced bilingual speaker. I think she provided an excellent break down of what was said. Those who are not familiar with Dominican or even Caribbean Spanish would find the Dominican speaker in the video difficult to understand.


Super!


-MP.

subscribe to her youtube channel, there isnt much on her instagram page. she does an excellent job breaking down dominican spanish there.
 

Marianopolita

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subscribe to her youtube channel, there isnt much on her instagram page. she does an excellent job breaking down dominican spanish there.


I will have look. I am always interested in different styles and of course her ability to break down the linguistic components. In that short video I think she was on point with the phonetic linking which is a characteristic of Spanish but it can be difficult for beginners like she said.


-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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I just looked that at this video in which our You Tuber talks about some basic observations about Spanish in the DR mainly the phonetic aspects.

Her relaxed approach to explaining the concepts I think is a plus especially for those who may feel overwhelmed when it comes to understanding Spanish spoken in the DR.

I will look at some more of her videos. They are definitely helpful with her visual explanations and breakdown. In this video point #3 is DR specific. The rest of examples can apply across the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Greater Antilles).



If you want to add to what was discussed in the video feel free.






-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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In the DR there are different accents. Accent by region primarily and then even by the speakers themselves. There are a few identified linguistic zones, the capital, el Cibao, el sur are the three main ones. As a result, while having a Dominican accent a speaker can be identified as to where they are from by the way they speak. Some speakers even sound quite neutral, not obviously Dominican but definitely Caribbean. Not everyone from Cibao speaks with the ‘I’. There are differences.



1) What Dominican accent do you like the most?

2) What Dominican accent do you like the least?

3) Do you recognize it when listening to a group of Spanish speakers?

4) How does it compare to other accents in the region i.e. Cuba or Puerto Rico?

5) Do you have an example of one of the DR accents that you like for example, of a journalist, a singer, a public figure etc.




-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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In this video the You Tuber wants you to practice your listening skills.


Me parece bien.






-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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You ever wonder about the R to L change? It is heard in the DR too. It is definitely most predominant in Puerto Rico then the DR and then in Cuba. It is in only heard in the Caribbean Antilles and not in the other Caribbean Spanish-speaking regions.

Amol, hablal, cambial, pol favol, etc. If you are learning Spanish there is no need to learn these forms but just be aware that you will hear them.






-MP.