Electric Cars in the DR

Jan 9, 2004
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I think after the severe cold up North and the failure of EVs to charge below a certain temperature many more will be on the market used.
Does the US give a credit for used EVs. Because that would be quite a scam selling friend to friend to friend and a big circle of $4K credits?

For my clients sake, I certainly hope you are correct. But note, cold weather affects all batteries ice or EV.

As to the credit, for a used EV in the US, it is 30% of the purchase price with a maximum of $4,000. The credit for a used EV can only be used once, so buying a 1 owner (easy to find) is a must.

Interesting is the fact that the dealer can also claim the credit and reduce the price of the vehicle to the consumer, or the consumer can claim it themselves on their tax return.

My clients are working with a Dominican car dealer who is more than happy to claim the credit and pass those savings onto them given the book of business they are providing him.

One final point, they can bring these vehicles in for only a slight premium to an electric golf cart…..which are used quite extensively in the AI’s, golf courses and private villa communities…….but with much more utility.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

Ecoman1949

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Depends on your monthly total consumption. I'm guessing it can quickly get very expensive
Our grid is 90% hydroelectric and our wattage rates are low for the time being. It’s expected to rise as new hydroelectric facilities are built. EV’s are being sold here slowly. Most buyers are still opting for ice or ice/hybrid because of our cold winters and large geographical area.

I chuckled when the polar vortex dipped far South into Canada and the US. Proof that nature has a way of shafting us even as we pursue what we think are effective means to limit climate change, the mad pursuit of EV’s. Climate change has decreased the ice land mass in the Arctic and the result is an unstable polar vortex. The circulation used to be predominantly further North. Now it has greater potential to dip further South.

In many provinces and states, power grids were tested to the max and oil and natural gas fuelled facilities saved the day. It would have been a catastrophe if we had relied on wind and solar. The DR has had a few rare extended periods of abnormally cool weather. Imagine the strain on the already undependable grid, if those periods increased. Imagine the disposal problems the used EV’s will generate in the DR, a country already dealing with landfill issues. The average Dominican can’t afford to buy a high end EV, let alone replace the battery systems in used ones. The reality is, the new love affair with EV’s will be short lived in many countries for climate, social and economic reasons.

Regarding the phase out of fossil fuel production, Canada with the fourth largest reserves of crude oil in the world, has just increased production to pump more oil through the TransCanada pipeline from Alberta to coastal British Columbia to ship more oil to foreign markets. New offshore wells are being developed on our East Coast to ship more petrochemical grade crude oil to US customers.

Relax folks. We will be driving gasoline powered vehicles well beyond the current North American governments production shutdown mandates.
 

windeguy

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Ecoman1949 , Abnormally cold weather in the DR would probably decrease energy usage because less air conditioning would be needed.
 

XQT

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For my clients sake, I certainly hope you are correct. But note, cold weather affects all batteries ice or EV.

As to the credit, for a used EV in the US, it is 30% of the purchase price with a maximum of $4,000. The credit for a used EV can only be used once, so buying a 1 owner (easy to find) is a must.

Interesting is the fact that the dealer can also claim the credit and reduce the price of the vehicle to the consumer, or the consumer can claim it themselves on their tax return.

My clients are working with a Dominican car dealer who is more than happy to claim the credit and pass those savings onto them given the book of business they are providing him.

One final point, they can bring these vehicles in for only a slight premium to an electric golf cart…..which are used quite extensively in the AI’s, golf courses and private villa communities…….but with much more utility.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2

It's positive to be in business, promote it and to make money.

The end consumer has to make their own valuation on real world conditions and if the purchase of an EV is beneficial.
Of course those with sufficient disposable income can play and experiment.

Consider where you live, what charging services and repair services are available.
What is the average distance you drive, what are the road conditions where you live, what is the ground clearance of the vehicle you purchase.

I can't help but laugh at people driving poser cars in the DR, considering the road conditions throughout the country.

Businessmen make money, good on them.

Buyer, Caveat emptor!
 
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Ecoman1949

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Ecoman1949 , Abnormally cold weather in the DR would probably decrease energy usage because less air conditioning would be needed.
Yes and no. Those who can afford air conditioning would use less power during the day if temps dropped a few degrees. If the temperature dropped more at night, those with split heat pump air conditioning would simply flip the dial and use them to heat their homes. The demand on the grid would shift from daylight to dark. The demand on an abnormally cool night would probably be less than the demand on an average hot day.

The extreme Southerly dip in the polar vortex last weekend dropped daily averages in some areas from 6 degrees to -32 degrees. God forbid something of that extreme nature should ever reach as far as the Caribbean. Highly unlikely but so is snow in Florida. Rare but it does happen. Friends of mine rushed to get to Florida during Xmas break a few years ago. Snow was falling when they walked out of midnight mass on Xmas eve. They weren’t impressed. 😂
 

windeguy

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Yes and no. Those who can afford air conditioning would use less power during the day if temps dropped a few degrees. If the temperature dropped more at night, those with split heat pump air conditioning would simply flip the dial and use them to heat their homes. The demand on the grid would shift from daylight to dark. The demand on an abnormally cool night would probably be less than the demand on an average hot day.
I don't know anybody in he DR that has a heat pump. Maybe someone in Constanza?

So, I stand with cooler temps saving energy by using less AC.
 

XQT

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Here is where real world enters dreams of green liberal governments with imposed dates, such as no combustion vehicle sales starting 2035.

How well prepared is the DR power grid for increased future demand?
How is electric power generated in the DR?

If the US and Canada are struggling to supply demand, obviously the DR is much worse off!




Thu, January 18, 2024, 7:32 AM AST


CALGARY — A series of electricity grid alerts in Alberta during the deep freeze last week made headlines across the country, but experts say power systems all across North America are increasingly at risk of being overloaded during severe weather.
Francis Bradley, CEO of the industry association Electricity Canada, said there is virtually nowhere the electricity grid isn't vulnerable to the rising severity and duration of climate change-related extreme weather.
“Over the last two years or so, during these extremes of weather, we’ve seen new peaks hit in terms of electricity demand," Bradley said in an interview.

"And it's not just in Alberta. We saw new peak demands hit last summer in Ontario, we saw new peak demand hit last winter in Quebec, for example. In most regions of the country, the extremes are increasing."
South of the border, electricity grids have suffered the strain in recent years. Winter storms led to blackouts in Texas in 2021 and blistering heat waves have forced California to declare repeated emergency grid alerts.

 

JD Jones

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Ecoman1949

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The search is on for natural underground hydrogen deposits in Canada and other countries. If international oil exploration companies decide it’s viable and can generate big bucks, I expect drilling for hydrogen to become the norm and hydrogen dispensers alongside gasoline dispensers at gas stations to quickly appear.

Think how quickly and easily automotive manufacturers can convert their production lines from gasoline engines to hydrogen engines. Significantly lower than the cost to completely change to EV production and the cost of building monster EV battery manufacturing facilities.

The DR market for cheaper more dependable hydrogen fuelled vehicles is probably better than the market for EV’s. Propane fuelled vehicles are popular in the DR and the infrastructure to store, handle, and dispense propane already exists. It’s not that big a leap to include hydrogen infrastructure.

We’re very aware of the pitfalls of DR electrical infrastructure and the need for more power and more dependable distribution. That won’t change and will worsen if the DR is flooded with EV’s. Imagine how long it would take to fully charge an EV with constant power interruptions and the long term effects of that on the EV battery and charging systems.
 
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windeguy

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If they can pump limitless hydrogen, then that will be a very good thing. Time will tell how hard that is to do.

 
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XQT

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The search is on for natural underground hydrogen deposits in Canada and other countries. If international oil exploration companies decide it’s viable and can generate big bucks, I expect drilling for hydrogen to become the norm and hydrogen dispensers alongside gasoline dispensers at gas stations to quickly appear.

Think how quickly and easily automotive manufacturers can convert their production lines from gasoline engines to hydrogen engines. Significantly lower than the cost to completely change to EV production and the cost of building monster EV battery manufacturing facilities.

The DR market for cheaper more dependable hydrogen fuelled vehicles is probably better than the market for EV’s. Propane fuelled vehicles are popular in the DR and the infrastructure to store, handle, and dispense propane already exists. It’s not that big a leap to include hydrogen infrastructure.

We’re very aware of the pitfalls of DR electrical infrastructure and the need for more power and more dependable distribution. That won’t change and will worsen if the DR is flooded with EV’s. Imagine how long it would take to fully charge an EV with constant power interruptions and the long term effects of that on the EV battery and charging systems.

Canada as the second largest country with enormous natural resources could be a great help for DR and other countries,
To supply traditional and renewable resources to the world.
Poor leadership and fantasy policies have prohibited this.
The only hope is a conservative business oriented government.

The single track EV policy with discontinuation of combustion engine manufacturing in Canada and EU will be unsuccessful.

In the DR there are plenty of old poorly maintained vehicles and diesel pick-up trucks along with diesel commercial trucks.
Combustion engines rule in the DR and will for a long time.

Chinese and other Oriental car manufactures are continuing to produce combustion engines, hybrid and EV vehicles, covering all bases
to achieve profitability.

"China laughs at the European e-car strategy and is taking a two-pronged approach.
There is no talk of a ban on combustion engines in China and Toyota boss Akio Toyoda predicts that electric cars will, at best, have a global market share of 30 percent.

Electric cars will never account for more than a third of the market and consumers should not be forced to buy them, the boss of Toyota has said.
Mr Toyoda argued that electric cars’ appeal is limited because one billion people in the world still live without electricity, while they are also expensive and need charging infrastructure to operate.
Touted for years by Toyoda, the “multi-pathway approach” argues that customers should be able to pick whatever car type fits their needs and that the shift to EVs will not be as rapid as some have predicted".



"The wind is changing in the USA
In recent days, Ford in the US announced that it would cut production of the all-electric F-150 Lightning in April to “ensure an optimal balance between production, sales growth and profitability”. The drop in the price of Tesla electric cars in the USA is causing discontent among electric car owners.

China is taking a multi-pronged approach
While Germany and Europe are betting everything on “electric motors” and the sale of new cars with combustion engines is expected to no longer be possible in the EU from 2035, China is taking a two-pronged approach. That means: electric and combustion engines. China has ruled out banning combustion engines. It is questionable whether the electric strategy of the German and European automobile manufacturers is working and whether combustion engine bans will actually come in large countries such as the USA, India, Russia as well as in the countries of South America, Africa and Southeast Asia".


This is where real world situations will dictate.
Private industry will continue to be the driving factor to develop future clean technologies.

Socialist green governments will be forced to wake up to real world realities.

This will show even more in poor underdeveloped countries like the DR and other likewise countries.