It may not be as safe here as you'd like, or would hope to believe.

arete92

Active member
Jul 5, 2018
293
109
43
It's actually based in Scripture, James 4:14-15, "Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. Instead, you ought to say, 'If it is the Lord’s will, we will live and do this or that.'"

Unfortunately, in Haiti and in the DR, it has become little more than a saying with no meaning behind it, although I'm sure there are some that truly believe it.
funny experiment I like to do - when someone asks for money I say si dios quere. It hurts their brain a bit when they realize im the one making the decision to give it to them or not, or the contractor si dios quere te pago
 

arete92

Active member
Jul 5, 2018
293
109
43
They'd call you a "classist bigot" upholding capitalism and condoning discrimination against "disadvantaged communities" (can't say poor people, not PC enough).
They are welcome to come here and help them ( minus my tax money ) when their shoes, car batteries, bed sheets are missing in the AM they may have graduated themselves to a disadvantaged community until their next paycheque.
 

arete92

Active member
Jul 5, 2018
293
109
43
It's actually based in Scripture, James 4:14-15, "Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. Instead, you ought to say, 'If it is the Lord’s will, we will live and do this or that.'"

Unfortunately, in Haiti and in the DR, it has become little more than a saying with no meaning behind it, although I'm sure there are some that truly believe it.
I understand there is truth to that though I am not going to dismiss that and ignorantly claim I am in 100% control of everything, we cannot control others, politics to a large extent, weather, accidents etc. But we can control our lives and what we choose to put our energy into to advance ourselves or collectively.
 

Aguaita29

Silver
Jul 27, 2011
2,640
308
83
lmao, I am sorry. Spreading fairy tales as real-life scenarios is simply not productive to the community. People should take caution when walking alone at night and be aware of their surroundings. Having their money drained by a woman with a baby is simply hilarious. Beig safe and aware at ATM machines is good advice. Having your guard up against fairy and pixie dust is comical.
Believe as you will. The lady was with a man and they took her to the bank. She went inside the bank and withdrew her and her husbands savings. She said it felt like they were old friends and she was happy being with them. She was gone for about 2 hours. We were looking around for her because it wasnt like her to go for that long without letting us know where she was going. Weeks after she still only remembered a little. It was terrible.

But believe as you wish. I am not a spreader of lies.
Nuria did a report on similar cases. They allegedly use a substance, Scopolamine, which makes people do what you want. The drug can be used in drinks, or it can be impregnated in a piece of paper.
 

SKY

Gold
Apr 11, 2004
13,677
3,822
113
I know of a credible incident where a lady was leaving Caribe Express in Bavaro, the one closer to Plaza Bavaro and was approached and gassed with something in the street. She gave whatever she had to the lady that did it...............
 

Big

Well-known member
Apr 24, 2019
5,017
4,179
113
Nuria did a report on similar cases. They allegedly use a substance, Scopolamine, which makes people do what you want. The drug can be used in drinks, or it can be impregnated in a piece of paper.
On a piece of paper? I say bogus! They would be dropping the stuff out of airplanes telling the enemy to throw down their weapons and surrender. Or you could sprinkle some near a 3-star general and say, "take me to your leader". Of course, a tainted drink is possible, however no one is going to walk to an ATM or a bank and withdraw monies. Further more, if this magical substance is so effective, can I get a pound. I want to blow it in the face of my chica and tell her to wash the dishes.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: nigrarosa and jd426

lifeisgreat

Enjoying Life
May 7, 2016
3,279
1,170
113
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,173
3,027
113
I understand there is truth to that though I am not going to dismiss that and ignorantly claim I am in 100% control of everything, we cannot control others, politics to a large extent, weather, accidents etc. But we can control our lives and what we choose to put our energy into to advance ourselves or collectively.
I'm sure there are members on here that don't abide by your stance on religion. If your are an atheist you should so state it. If not I take exception to your many references as to how one practices their faith in God.
I hope the mods will see my point of view and that religion is not discussed here on DR1 as stated in the TOS.
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,819
6,202
113
dr1.com
I hate the constant "si Dios quiere" mantra.

-Will you come and clean my house tomorrow ?
- Si Dios quiere.

- Will you be on time for our meeting?
- si Dios quiere.

- Will you start saving up some money this year?
- si Dios quieres.

No self-accountability.
It is said by almost all Dominicans without really meaning what they say, and rarely used in the way you indicate. Used more for heath and bigger life issues more often.
It's a mental framework independent of religion but still has the same effect on a person regardless of the prophet, god, person. When you believe you truly have no control over your life and everything is decided for you because of gods will then you assume that there is nothing you can do to advance your career, knowledge, and health because it's 100% dependent on a god(s) If you expect great things of that person like showing up on time I wouldnt count on it. As a side effect they are generally chill happy people.

"If God Wanted Us to Fly, He Would Have Given Us Wings" No, he gave us brains to build propulsion systems to go into space.​

That is your own interpretation. Most religious people do not live their life that way, regardless of the religion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zeferus and johne

Facepalm Supreme

Active member
Dec 29, 2022
190
174
43
Santo Domingo
I hate the constant "si Dios quiere" mantra.

-Will you come and clean my house tomorrow ?
- Si Dios quiere.

- Will you be on time for our meeting?
- si Dios quiere.

- Will you start saving up some money this year?
- si Dios quieres.

No self-accountability.
I deeply appreciate the comments arete92. The advice you give is sound, and the tactics regarding giving a motoconcho 300 pesos or the security guy 500 make sense, though I agree the motoconcho would work better. I didn't ask anyone to pat me on the back or hold my hand but I do want to treat this issue thoroughly and I'm quite frankly disappointed by how the general tone of the thread had been going prior to your posts, which are very insightful and add a lot to the conversation. I thank you for that. As much as dominicans stick together it seems like expats are at each other's throats, or at least mine. This is my first thread here on the forums, and what a welcome it has been.


I totally get where you are coming from DR fan1990. I have had past cleaners say the same, and I have two things to say.

NOTICE - LINGUISTICS, NOT RELIGION BEING DISCUSSED HERE:


1. it is the basic phrase "God Willing" that exists in English. That said, when it is said here I often interpret it based on context to mean something more like "I Should be able to but that depends on what comes up." As Bob says, think "Ah, hoy no puedo, mi niño tiene gripe" or "tenemos que visitar a mi abuela en el hospital," Or the popular "Ah pero hoy está lloviendo". For lots of people here apparently rain, however little it may be, is like a blizzard in the depths of winter. You shall not pass!!


The same phrase is *Extremely* popular in Arabic and muslim countries and is "Inshallah", from which we get the spanish "Ojalá". In Arabic this phrase is MUCH more literally uttered, from a cultual/linguistic perspective that absolutely nothing occurs that isn't willed by God and thus although people will make definite statements, as a caveat it is always acceptable to say "Inshallah", more in the context of "I sure hope so but we never know what God's plans are", almost an avoidance of making any pure definitive statements out of a desire to avoid being disrespectful.

I like to see the glass half full so I try to give people the benefit of the doubt but like I said, when it's said here contextually it's very much more a person telling you that they intend on X, Y, Z but they don't know what other options or events may arise and they want to keep themselves open.

I find this whole "Yeah I should be able to as long as nothing else comes up" attitude to be very popular here and as an English-based Westerner I too find it off-putting. Plans are much less definite, and a lot of what happens has to do with how someone feels or what last minute issues/opportunities arise. Makes it harder to get things done. Same concept as the Jamaican "Soon come". At a certain point it just becomes being undisciplined and/or taking life less seriously.

I wrote this up before I saw JD426's response.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aguaita29

jd426

Gold
Dec 12, 2009
9,596
2,871
113
Not to hate on my Jamaican friends , and I do have some dear Jamaican friends from many years ago,
but I have to say their version of " soon come" is the most annoying of all .
On my first and Only trip to Jamaica I believed this nonsense, when I gave 2 nice Shirts and Shorts to the Laundry at the Hotel, a NICE Hotel mind you . Every day like an Idiot I asked about it and was told " it soon come".. I gave up, considered it gone .. 7 full days later , at checkout , there was my Laundry all folded up , useless to me now, just threw it in the already closed suitcase .
Its one of the reasons I never went back .. they cant be relied upon to do even a Simple task even when tipped .
The DR is very similar , as some of the comments have clearly indicated, but it is definitely better
.. A little Propina to the Moto guy goes a long way , but its not nearly as bad as Jamaica, where they want the sneakers off your feet ( how you supposed to walk around ?) and to trade for everything you are wearing , and they will literally pop out of the bushes to ambush you.

I cant even Imagine trying to hire a Housekeeper . You would have to know people from back home , or you would get fleeced .
 

ramesses

Gold
Jun 17, 2005
6,674
809
113
Not to hate on my Jamaican friends , and I do have some dear Jamaican friends from many years ago,
but I have to say their version of " soon come" is the most annoying of all .
On my first and Only trip to Jamaica I believed this nonsense, when I gave 2 nice Shirts and Shorts to the Laundry at the Hotel, a NICE Hotel mind you . Every day like an Idiot I asked about it and was told " it soon come".. I gave up, considered it gone .. 7 full days later , at checkout , there was my Laundry all folded up , useless to me now, just threw it in the already closed suitcase .
Its one of the reasons I never went back .. they cant be relied upon to do even a Simple task even when tipped .
The DR is very similar , as some of the comments have clearly indicated, but it is definitely better
.. A little Propina to the Moto guy goes a long way , but its not nearly as bad as Jamaica, where they want the sneakers off your feet ( how you supposed to walk around ?) and to trade for everything you are wearing , and they will literally pop out of the bushes to ambush you.

I cant even Imagine trying to hire a Housekeeper . You would have to know people from back home , or you would get fleeced .
I love the people of Jamaica and of the DR. That said, the DR is a cake walk toward Jamaica. The food is amazing in Jamaica as is the music but it is so hard to find security. I remember my first trip to the DR which was only weeks after leaving Jamaica and feeling such a relief. I still will visit Jamaica but prefer the DR.
 

CristoRey

Welcome To Wonderland
Apr 1, 2014
11,990
8,252
113
I hate the constant "si Dios quiere" mantra.

-Will you come and clean my house tomorrow ?
- Si Dios quiere.

- Will you be on time for our meeting?
- si Dios quiere.

- Will you start saving up some money this year?
- si Dios quieres.

No self-accountability.
Respect.
Refund.
Responsibilty...
Better to look elsewhere more often then not.
 

CristoRey

Welcome To Wonderland
Apr 1, 2014
11,990
8,252
113
funny experiment I like to do - when someone asks for money I say si dios quere. It hurts their brain a bit when they realize im the one making the decision to give it to them or not, or the contractor si dios quere te pago
Here's how I handle people asking for money.
When someone ask me for money I always respond in kind, "possibly, how much do you need", then after they tell me (usually never more than two hundred pesos) I say the following "sure no problem, I can lend you some pesos but you will need to give me your cell phone until you pay me back"
10+ years of living here full-time and not a single person has ever taken me up on my offer.
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
23,319
6,591
113
South Coast
Here's how I handle people asking for money.
When someone ask me for money I always respond in kind, "possibly, how much do you need", then after they tell me (usually never more than two hundred pesos) I say the following "sure no problem, I can lend you some pesos but you will need to give me your cell phone until you pay me back"
10+ years of living here full-time and not a single person has ever taken me up on my offer.

I like that.

Mr AE has a different strategy. One of our neighbors in the campo is constantly borrowing money. Always has a story: needs to buy wood for a job (he’s an excellent carpenter, made me a beautiful mahogany closet), has to fix his car (he also drives a publico), someone has to go to doctor, etc. He always pays him back, but then inevitably needs money again in a week or two. So now when he asks Mr AE gives it to him (2500 pesos last time), but when he came to repay him Mr AE told him to hold onto it for now as he might need it again, and to pay when we’re leaving. Accomplished a couple of things….. he couldn’t borrow more because he already owed him, so peace and quiet for 2-3-4 months 😊. He’s never stiffed him yet.

With others, he tells them if they need money, we’ll pay them to come do some work on the finca for a day or more. Some do, most don’t. The old ladies in the campo sometimes ask for a bit to buy breakfast or dinner food, those he usually just gives to and there is no expectation of repayment.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
May 6, 2016
12,846
6,638
113
There is a guy with a bad leg that sits adjacent to the ATM at Banco Santa Cruz in Sosua. One day I gave him 100 pesos, then went to the ATM, withdrew money and then to Super Super to buy a Red Bull.
On the way back buy he asked me again, and I told him I gave you 100 pesos 3 minutes ago. He then asked for another 100. (Guess he figured since I hit the ATM I was flush with pesos.
Needless to say he never got any more from me.
I'm sorry his leg is messed up but he's off my people-I-help list.
Maybe he can learn to code ?