New measures in response to diverting of river waters at the border with Haiti

drstock

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Yes they need to get around and it is DR's interest they have free movement that they pay for. Heck they may decide to go back to their family in Haiti and have no means to get there.
You are absolutely right there. I actually know of a Haitian who is fed up with all the problems he is encountering here and wants to return to Haiti. But how can he go? (He doesn't want to get arrested, locked up in jail and then get sent back "free".)
 

bachata

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The intake capacity of the canal is 3 M cubic of water, meanwhile the river carries only 2 cubic meters in the place where they are building el dique o la toma de agua.

We have to stop the construction that is a national emergency.

JJ
 

cavok

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The intake capacity of the canal is 3 M cubic of water, meanwhile the river carries only 2 cubic meters in the place where they are building el dique o la toma de agua.

We have to stop the construction that is a national emergency.

JJ
I think the overall reporting on this issue is very poor. Just how much of the river's flow can be diverted by this canal (and the agreement supposedly prohibits the diversion of the river by both parties) is extremely important. If your numbers are correct, there will be little to no water downstream of the canal in the river itself.
 

bachata

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I think the overall reporting on this issue is very poor. Just how much of the river's flow can be diverted by this canal (and the agreement supposedly prohibits the diversion of the river by both parties) is extremely important. If your numbers are correct, there will be little to no water downstream of the canal in the river itself.
I watched a TV show last night where they interviewed two Dominican experts in geology & engineerings whom have worked in the construction and evaluation of different canals along DR INDRHI that's how I learned why is the big concern of the Dominican people who lived in the area.
There will very little to no water left if they complete that project.

JJ
 
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JD Jones

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Well maybe they fear for their lives ? I can't blame them.
But if you enter any country illegally you have to be ready to leave on a moment's notice
A lot of them are returning. I was surprised at the quantity.
 
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MoJoInDR

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From Google Maps satellite image it looks like the farmland on the DR side of the border is far more expansive than the farmland on the Haitian side — maybe three times as large — so it's understandable that there is more need for farmland water on the DR side. But when it comes to the Dajabon/Ouanaminthe town, it seems that there are way more homes on the Haitian side, which means a need for water for human consumption.

It looks like there is another fairly large river, Yaque Del Norte, that's not too far to the east on the DR side, with a lot of farmland around it also.

This area, especially in the DR, seems to be a pretty productive farming area, and I wonder why there hasn't been an effort to dam sections (or pump water from them into a storage area) of these rivers so that in rainy months the excess water that isn't used and just runs off into the sea can't be stored for dry months.

An uncle of mine was the head of a dam project in Peru where they had to redirect a large river through a mountain in order to build the dam. It was quite a project that I believe was funded by the World Bank (my uncle worked for the WB). I believe that a part of the project was to direct water to a dry, desert area. Anyway, my point is, isn't funding available for projects that would solve problems related to food production? If so, why are governments not coming together to figure out a real solution to this problem instead of squabbling like mindless fools over leftovers?

This area is obviously a type of breadbasket (an important agricultural production area) for the two countries. This being the case, the area's importance, and need to become more productive, will grow as time passes.

Governing bodies, and the citizens, need to be looking way beyond the micro issues of today.
 

bob saunders

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From Google Maps satellite image it looks like the farmland on the DR side of the border is far more expansive than the farmland on the Haitian side — maybe three times as large — so it's understandable that there is more need for farmland water on the DR side. But when it comes to the Dajabon/Ouanaminthe town, it seems that there are way more homes on the Haitian side, which means a need for water for human consumption.

It looks like there is another fairly large river, Yaque Del Norte, that's not too far to the east on the DR side, with a lot of farmland around it also.

This area, especially in the DR, seems to be a pretty productive farming area, and I wonder why there hasn't been an effort to dam sections (or pump water from them into a storage area) of these rivers so that in rainy months the excess water that isn't used and just runs off into the sea can't be stored for dry months.

An uncle of mine was the head of a dam project in Peru where they had to redirect a large river through a mountain in order to build the dam. It was quite a project that I believe was funded by the World Bank (my uncle worked for the WB). I believe that a part of the project was to direct water to a dry, desert area. Anyway, my point is, isn't funding available for projects that would solve problems related to food production? If so, why are governments not coming together to figure out a real solution to this problem instead of squabbling like mindless fools over leftovers?

This area is obviously a type of breadbasket (an important agricultural production area) for the two countries. This being the case, the area's importance, and need to become more productive, will grow as time passes.

Governing bodies, and the citizens, need to be looking way beyond the micro issues of today.
The Yaque Del Norte has a large dam and reservoir on it which is used to supply agricultural land and the city of Santiago.
 

bachata

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The Yaque Del Norte has a large dam and reservoir on it which is used to supply agricultural land and the city of Santiago.
Yes but theses dam have negative results over the Rio Yaque basin, same is going to happen in Dajabón and Manzanillo if they let the Haitians driver the water of Rio Masacre.

JJ
 

cavok

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I think the canal will have a much more negative effect than any dam will. Land that was dry before the dam was built will be under water whereas that canal will divert much of the river's flow downstream of it. Kind of opposite effects.
 

Northern Coast Diver

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The Masacre River flows through the RD for miles before it becomes part of the border and then dips into Haiti. A new canal on Dominican soil would deny water to that Haitian canal.
 
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bachata

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The Masacre River flows through the RD for miles before it becomes part of the border and then dips into Haiti. A new canal on Dominican soil would deny water to that Haitian canal.
Yes I thought about that 😔 the river basin in Haitian soil is about 2 km.

JJ
 

JD Jones

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A 2 kilometer canal around the eastern side of the free trade zone could reroute the river around that canal.
One already exists:
ATTENTION. URGENT. The Dominican Republic began work to reactivate the Customs Intake on the Dajabón River, at the beginning of the La Vigía canal, as a short-term measure to guarantee water supply to Dominican producers. The canal is at least ten kilometers long and has not been in operation since 2007 or 2008. The president

He had explained that through this channel a flow of at least one cubic meter of water can be distributed per second, “sufficient quantity to be able to distribute the liquid that is to the south of Haitian territory and the water returns to the Massacre River further to the North, after the town of Dajabón.” The authorization of the La Vigía canal was ordered by the Dominican government in response to the conflict over the illegal construction of a canal on the Massacre River as it passes through Haiti.


What if the Haitians built a canal and no water came?