Omicron Protection

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william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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Here's my friend's study results

Note the importance of the T & B cells - which No America and Europe don't have
-------------------------------------------------------

Here is a good article explaining in simple terms why booster jabs can be very effective against Omicron and so recommended, when two jabs have virtiually zilch effect - it is a learning process:

Omicron: Why do boosters work if two doses struggle?

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-59639973

The heavily mutated Omicron variant has led to a serious dent in the ability of vaccines to protect us from catching the Covid virus.

Two doses of some vaccines offer almost no protection from an Omicron infection, although they should still greatly reduce the risk of becoming so ill you need hospital care.

The vaccines were all developed to fight the first form of the virus that emerged two years ago.

So can a third or "booster" dose of those original vaccines make the difference or has Omicron already outwitted the protection they can give?

Fortunately for us - while the contents of the syringe may be identical, a booster is not just more of the same for the immune system.

The protection you're left with after the third dose is bigger, broader and more memorable than you had before.

Covid school

Fighting coronavirus is something your immune system has to learn.

One option is to figure it out on the job when you encounter the virus for real. However, there is a risk of getting it wrong and ending up seriously ill.

Vaccines are more like a school - a safer environment to further your immune system's Covid education.

The first dose is the primary school education that nails the fundamentals.

Your second and third doses are comparable to sending your immune system to secondary school and then university to dramatically deepen its understanding. It's not just repeating primary school over and over.

"The immune system is left with a richer knowledge and understanding of the virus," said Prof Jonathan Ball, a virologist from the University of Nottingham.

He said for all the talk of the dastardly tricks of Omicron, a highly-trained immune system is "an incredibly difficult and hostile environment" for the virus and its variants.

Antibodies are a major beneficiary of this education.

These are the sticky proteins that attach themselves to the outside of the coronavirus. Neutralising antibodies can gum up the virus so it can't invade your cells. Others sit there as the biological equivalent of a flashing neon sign spelling out "kill this virus".

A flurry of laboratory studies and real world data showed the neutralising antibodies you have after two doses of a Covid vaccine were far less effective against Omicron.

Prof Danny Altmann, an immunologist from Imperial College London, said you were left with "absolutely zilch" and were a "sitting duck for infection".

So back to school.

Every dose of the vaccine triggers another round of antibody evolution within the immune system. It seeks out better antibodies that attach themselves more firmly to the virus. It's a process called affinity maturation.

"Your antibodies are a better fit as time goes on, they are getting fancier and more sophisticated," said Prof Altmann.

If the antibodies are able to bind more tightly to the coronavirus then it will be harder for Omicron's mutations to help it wriggle free. And while the new variant is heavily mutated, it is still the same fundamental virus and has parts that have not changed at all.

Further rounds of vaccination also lead to the immune system broadening its antibody repertoire as it finds new ways of attacking the virus.

Numbers game

It's not just about the quality of antibodies, the quantity goes up with boosting too.

Prof Charles Bangham, from Imperial, said: "You get more of them, the concentration in the blood increases and we don't know how long this is going to last, but the more times you're vaccinated the longer-lasting the immune memory is."

The impact of all this is clear in the same studies that showed two doses were weaker against Omicron. The protection against getting any Covid symptoms shot up to around 75% after the booster.

Elsewhere in the immune system, boosting is giving our bodies the upper hand against future variants too.

B-cells are the part of the body that mass produce antibodies. Some mature to produce those super-sticky, highly refined antibodies after boosting. Others can spot coronavirus, but remain half-baked and flexible.

"These can go off in different directions and when they proliferate they start to go after the new variant," said Prof Ball.

And then there's T-cells, which again become more plentiful and better at attacking Covid viruses in response to boosting.

T-cells use a different trick to spot the virus and patrol our body looking for any sign of cells being infected with Covid. T-cells recognise parts of the coronavirus that the virus finds harder to mutate.

So while Omicron is squirming away from our immune system, each vaccine dose and indeed each infection is giving our body's defences more tools to hunt it down.

All this bodes well for vaccines protecting us from becoming seriously ill.

"Immunity against a virus is almost never absolute - you can almost always get re-infected and what you want to do is get re-infection so trivial you don't know you've got it or it's very mild," said Prof Bangham.


This article begs the question if one should stay with the same vaccine so the body learning process is not disrupted?
 
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El Hijo de Manolo

The Arepa King
Dec 10, 2021
561
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Dominican Republic
Here's my friend's study results

Note the importance of the T & B cells - which No America and Europe don't have
-------------------------------------------------------

Here is a good article explaining in simple terms why booster jabs can be very effective against Omicron and so recommended, when two jabs have virtiually zilch effect - it is a learning process:

Omicron: Why do boosters work if two doses struggle?

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-59639973

The heavily mutated Omicron variant has led to a serious dent in the ability of vaccines to protect us from catching the Covid virus.

Two doses of some vaccines offer almost no protection from an Omicron infection, although they should still greatly reduce the risk of becoming so ill you need hospital care.

The vaccines were all developed to fight the first form of the virus that emerged two years ago.

So can a third or "booster" dose of those original vaccines make the difference or has Omicron already outwitted the protection they can give?

Fortunately for us - while the contents of the syringe may be identical, a booster is not just more of the same for the immune system.

The protection you're left with after the third dose is bigger, broader and more memorable than you had before.

Covid school

Fighting coronavirus is something your immune system has to learn.

One option is to figure it out on the job when you encounter the virus for real. However, there is a risk of getting it wrong and ending up seriously ill.

Vaccines are more like a school - a safer environment to further your immune system's Covid education.

The first dose is the primary school education that nails the fundamentals.

Your second and third doses are comparable to sending your immune system to secondary school and then university to dramatically deepen its understanding. It's not just repeating primary school over and over.

"The immune system is left with a richer knowledge and understanding of the virus," said Prof Jonathan Ball, a virologist from the University of Nottingham.

He said for all the talk of the dastardly tricks of Omicron, a highly-trained immune system is "an incredibly difficult and hostile environment" for the virus and its variants.

Antibodies are a major beneficiary of this education.

These are the sticky proteins that attach themselves to the outside of the coronavirus. Neutralising antibodies can gum up the virus so it can't invade your cells. Others sit there as the biological equivalent of a flashing neon sign spelling out "kill this virus".

A flurry of laboratory studies and real world data showed the neutralising antibodies you have after two doses of a Covid vaccine were far less effective against Omicron.

Prof Danny Altmann, an immunologist from Imperial College London, said you were left with "absolutely zilch" and were a "sitting duck for infection".

So back to school.

Every dose of the vaccine triggers another round of antibody evolution within the immune system. It seeks out better antibodies that attach themselves more firmly to the virus. It's a process called affinity maturation.

"Your antibodies are a better fit as time goes on, they are getting fancier and more sophisticated," said Prof Altmann.

If the antibodies are able to bind more tightly to the coronavirus then it will be harder for Omicron's mutations to help it wriggle free. And while the new variant is heavily mutated, it is still the same fundamental virus and has parts that have not changed at all.

Further rounds of vaccination also lead to the immune system broadening its antibody repertoire as it finds new ways of attacking the virus.

Numbers game

It's not just about the quality of antibodies, the quantity goes up with boosting too.

Prof Charles Bangham, from Imperial, said: "You get more of them, the concentration in the blood increases and we don't know how long this is going to last, but the more times you're vaccinated the longer-lasting the immune memory is."

The impact of all this is clear in the same studies that showed two doses were weaker against Omicron. The protection against getting any Covid symptoms shot up to around 75% after the booster.

Elsewhere in the immune system, boosting is giving our bodies the upper hand against future variants too.

B-cells are the part of the body that mass produce antibodies. Some mature to produce those super-sticky, highly refined antibodies after boosting. Others can spot coronavirus, but remain half-baked and flexible.

"These can go off in different directions and when they proliferate they start to go after the new variant," said Prof Ball.

And then there's T-cells, which again become more plentiful and better at attacking Covid viruses in response to boosting.

T-cells use a different trick to spot the virus and patrol our body looking for any sign of cells being infected with Covid. T-cells recognise parts of the coronavirus that the virus finds harder to mutate.

So while Omicron is squirming away from our immune system, each vaccine dose and indeed each infection is giving our body's defences more tools to hunt it down.

All this bodes well for vaccines protecting us from becoming seriously ill.

"Immunity against a virus is almost never absolute - you can almost always get re-infected and what you want to do is get re-infection so trivial you don't know you've got it or it's very mild," said Prof Bangham.


This article begs the question if one should stay with the same vaccine so the body learning process is not disrupted?
I feel like you posted this the other day
 

CristoRey

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Apr 1, 2014
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Anyone living in the Dominican Republic for the past two years knows how efficient Sinovac has been here. Others who have their head up their propanda stations rear end while residing elsewhere have NO clue....................
100% aGREED.
I'm currently at 3 jabs a month but I'm trying to cut back. Man this juice is addictive but on a positive note, I'm finally off the Snake Oil.
 
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Jan 9, 2004
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Proof is in the cases or lack of.
.it can even make people believe that it s doing something that it is not.


So why did the DR stop using Si No Vac............or more importantly why did so many people in the DR refuse it and demand pfizer or moderna or?............

Country after country.

The answer of course is.............it really in reality is not that good................or the world would be beating a path to it and bypassing everything else.

Placebo like effects are powerful psychologically............that is for sure....it can even make people believe that it s doing something that it is not.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

SKY

Gold
Apr 11, 2004
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Sinovac Approved by all these countries. Does anyone with half a brain still believe that Sinovac would be approved by 48 Countries if it was a placebo. How dumb can you get.............​




Approvals​


who-logo.png
WHO Emergency Use Listing

48 Countries​

 
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cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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This is why you hold a .13 positive reaction ratio :oops:
You can't judge by that anymore. When this new website format was created, a lot of posters had all their "likes" wiped out. "Dislikes" were also removed because they were deemed too traumatic for some posters.
 
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cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Who has the most soccer players collapsing on the field - Europe, or South America?
 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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The DR did NOT stop, using Sinovac........ still uses it

As a a visitor (Playa) you may be confused about the booster -
Pfizer is offered as is Sinovac........ choose for yourself... I did

For the initial vax , there was no choice
 

ben jammin

Well-known member
Aug 3, 2007
634
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Check out the charts for Colombia and Chile where Sinovac was used and compare to UK, France, and Germany. Are you going to believe your lying eyes, or what you hear in the news? They want you to take the mRNA vaccines. Don't do it.





Many many more international travelers in these European countries than Chile and Colombia. Maybe this fact has a little to do with infections rates?
 

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Many many more international travelers in these European countries than Chile and Colombia. Maybe this fact has a little to do with infections rates?
There were some very strict international travel bans into Europe, no?
 

cavok

Silver
Jun 16, 2014
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Maybe population density? Lots of demographical differences between these countries.
That's possible, but in a lot of countries like Colombia there's a very high percentage of the population that lives in urban areas with high population density. I've heard that almost 50% of the population here lives in the greater Santo Domingo area(?). The poor in particular in these countries are in very densly populated ares.
 

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Remember the days when South Korea was the "gold standard" and widely praised for how it stopped covid? The number of cases and deaths are now exploding exponentially and at record highs. South Korea is 92% fully vaccinated and relied heavily on Pfizer and Moderna vaccines;


 

chico bill

Platinum with a Bullet
May 6, 2016
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Want Omicron, with mild symptoms and easily treatable, or permanent heart problems (1/100 probability)??

My brother-in-law's life was permanently altered after two shots of Pfizer with arrhythmia, and his wife (my sister) had a small stroke after a Pfizer booster. They believed the hype and thought they were doing the right thing.

Now this study :

Sure 1/100 still gives you a 99/100 chance?
Maybe not after 3 or 4 jabs.
What if it becomes 1/25 ?
Will you still stay in the vax line?
 
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