The top 10 cities where the best Spanish is spoken

aarhus

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I don't recall ever hearing that, but most of my time was spent in San Jose. Maybe it isn't used as much in the capital(?).
What about the “medio pollo” for a cortadito I think it is.
 

It wasn't me

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location, location, location
Of course there are just as there are some Dominicans that speak well. Those with college educations and professional careers. But they also speak English for the most part. But after being in Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Honduras, and living 10 years in PR, 1 year in Costa Rica and being in DR since 2014 I can say Colombia is good, Mexico and Guatemala also - the rest no very good pronunciation
You often seem to have issues with English, your cradle language I'm guessing. ;)

I would not bother correcting spelling under normal circumstances, but since you're being soooo particular... LOL :p
 

NALs

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And ALL of the radio and TV personalities pronounce 'CInema' as 'ciNEma', with emphasis on the second syllable, when talking about Caribbean Cinema.
No one pronounces 'media' as it should be, but insist on pronouncing 'media' as in sock, when referring to Alofoke Media Group.
Folks are now asking that their orders con entrega a domicilio be delivered by "un delivery".
Many people pronounce CA-nada instead of Cana-DA. Even suppose migration lawyers on TV mention that place as if they are speaking in English. I highly doubt they know the correct way of saying that name in Spanish.

Then again, Dominicans can't differentiate between Arawak words and Spanish ones either. It's all Spanish as far as almost everyone is concerned. Mata, palo or árbol... eh, all the same.
 

Marianopolita

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That mispronunciation of Canada by Dominicans drives me nuts….and I would say to them Canadá and then they would repeat it as Cánada….really? That is the English pronunciation. DR is the only Spanish-speaking country where I hear that blatant mispronunciation.
 
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Marianopolita

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I don't recall ever hearing that, but most of my time was spent in San Jose. Maybe it isn't used as much in the capital(?).

Listen out next time you go. I learned it through my studies and you will find it on the list of CR slang words to know. That along with tuanis.
 
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Lucifer

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Many people pronounce CA-nada instead of Cana-DA. Even suppose migration lawyers on TV mention that place as if they are speaking in English. I highly doubt they know the correct way of saying that name in Spanish.

Then again, Dominicans can't differentiate between Arawak words and Spanish ones either. It's all Spanish as far as almost everyone is concerned. Mata, palo or árbol... eh, all the same.
I only criticize the communicators, as it should be the least they can do: communicate clearly and concisely.
However, their constant use of English words and phrases leaves much to be desired.

I've heard communicators refer to different US states in embarrassing ways:
"Tenemos dominicanos en todos los estados americanos: en Nueva York, en Manhattan, Boston, en Miami, Chicago, Texas, Illinois...Flórida, Houston, Orlando..."
Two weeks ago, Diario Libre published an article about a Dominican man apprehended in the city of Providence... MASSACHUSETTS, ignoring that the Providence Journal, in the Ocean State, had written about the local man's arrest.

Cánada vs Canadá is a classic case. Then there is their insistence on using--and mispronouncing--story and history, confusing one term for the other.

And print media doesn't help, either, as already mentioned by Marianopolita, when referring to the messed up syntax with, in my opinion, Diario Libre constituting exhibit 'A'.

Dominican media and communicators would benefit tremendously by reading FUNDÉU, an initiative maintained by DR1's own legal expert, Dr. Fabio J. Guzmán, from the Guzmán-Ariza Law firm.
 
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aarhus

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I only criticize the communicators, as it should be the least they can do: communicate clearly and concisely.
However, their constant use of English words and phrases leaves much to be desired.

I've heard communicators refer to different US states in embarrassing ways:
"Tenemos dominicanos en todos los estados americanos: en Nueva York, en Manhattan, Boston, en Miami, Chicago, Texas, Illinois...Flórida, Houston, Orlando..."
Two weeks ago, Diario Libre published an article about a Dominican man apprehended in the city of Providence... MASSACHUSETTS, ignoring that the Providence Journal, in the Ocean State, had written about the local man's arrest.

Cánada vs Canadá is a classic case. Then there is their insistence on using--and mispronouncing--story and history, confusing one term for the other.

And print media doesn't help, either, as already mentioned by Marianopolita, when referring to the messed up syntax with, in my opinion, Diario Libre constituting exhibit 'A'.

Dominican media and communicators would benefit tremendously by reading FUNDÉU, an initiative maintained by DR1's own legal expert, Dr. Fabio J. Guzmán, from the Guzmán-Ariza Law firm.
Also real state I still see a lot.
 
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NachoBroadway

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Jan 3, 2017
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Good list. Peruvian Spanish is like Ivy League. Mexico City amazing, they call me caballero, very formal.
And Colombia yes. Spain I guess.
 

NachoBroadway

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Miami is like its own Spanish-speaking country. With such a high percentage of Spanish speakers it’s more dominant than Spanish on the West coast USA. It’s definitely very handy if you speak Spanish in Miami.
It really is, the only U.S. city I visit where I encounter so many non-English speakers. It's vastly more Spanish than NYC or LA, very likely your Uber driver will speak ZERO English. Miami is dominated by Cubans.
 
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Marianopolita

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It really is, the only U.S. city I visit where I encounter so many non-English speakers. It's vastly more Spanish than NYC or LA, very likely your Uber driver will speak ZERO English. Miami is dominated by Cubans.

When I visit Miami I feel like I am in a Latin country not the USA. Spanish is the main language in the greater Miami area. Cubans, yes but significant numbers of other Latin communities i.e. Venezuelans they have overtaken Doral, Colombians are significant in the Kendall area, then Nicaraguans. It saves me a trip to Latin America. I can get everything I need + Spanish in Miami.
 

Marianopolita

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Good list. Peruvian Spanish is like Ivy League. Mexico City amazing, they call me caballero, very formal.
And Colombia yes. Spain I guess.
It depends where in Peru. Lima, yes but the accent changes noticeably outside of the capital. You will notice the difference but it is still understandable.
 
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cavok

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I think the Spanish in Spain is like the English in England. I'm sure they think it is the purest and best form of English, but like Spanish speakers who have learned American English, they find British English a little difficult to understand. I find some British a little hard to understand if they've had too many pints!
 

zoomzx11

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I agree with San Jose, CR. I found the Spanish there fairly easy to understand.
same here.
For a time I thought it was me.
Dominican wife told me my Spanish was terrible with a gringo accent but I noticed that Columbians understood me fine.
After time I realized that Dominican Spanish is the equivalent to what passes for English in the mountains of West Virginia.

Other issue is that Dominicans do not make an effort to understand.
 

Lucifer

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I think the Spanish in Spain is like the English in England. I'm sure they think it is the purest and best form of English, but like Spanish speakers who have learned American English, they find British English a little difficult to understand. I find some British a little hard to understand if they've had too many pints!
I would hope I'm not the exception, for I find the standard British accent sophisticated and charming. And what I refer to standard is the usual form we hear from TV folks and British politicians, or the BBC. I think they call it the Queen's English, if I'm not mistaken. Sexyyyyyyy!

However, I know there is a variety of dialects and accents, depending on the region. Heck! Even Cockney sounds sexy.
 
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Lucifer

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When I visit Miami I feel like I am in a Latin country not the USA. Spanish is the main language in the greater Miami area. Cubans, yes but significant numbers of other Latin communities i.e. Venezuelans they have overtaken Doral, Colombians are significant in the Kendall area, then Nicaraguans. It saves me a trip to Latin America. I can get everything I need + Spanish in Miami.
Oh, yes, indeed!
I love Miami. It's like being in Latin America, minus the prying eyes and the constant criticism of how we look and dress.
 
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