What country will the DR be similar to?

In five years the DR will be similar to


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NALs

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Most of the people now with household names not that long ago were nobodies so to speak. The Dominican government granted scholarships to many to study in universities abroad and that was based on their academic record. If it wasn't for that, it's very likely they would had never gone. In the case of Frank Rainieri, he felt much pressure to stay in the USA at the time he decided to return to the DR. For many years afterwards people actually felt sorry for him including his own family members that would tell him to give up on that "pipe dream." Of course, no one feels sorry for him now, but that's now. For a good amount of his life he was ine of the subjects of the gossip in Santo Domingo.
 

Nadie21

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How much money can be thrown to education to, for example, get most Dominican teachers to read a book?


And yet, that very system produces well rounded education for students intent on learning rather than going to school to socialize and killing time. Now Dominican public schools are into giving meals too, add getting a full belly to that too.


Well then, the next time give them a children's book and check up on that in a few months. One of the persons I mentioned previously grew up in a wooden shack with zinc roof and dirt floors. He went to the same public schools some are blaming for the education level and yet, he was able to get a scholarship and is now one of the highest income earners in the USA, among Dominicans he would most likely be in the 1%. Lets simply ignore him, because we all know the problem are the teachers and "the system" of Dominican public schools and not the students themselves. It makes it very hard to "blame the system" when this very same "system" produced him. Did I mentioned he also had a sister and has a brother who didn't have the grades to follow a similar path. They were like most of the other students in the same public schools, since all three attended the same primary and secondary schools.


More like some people don't want to accept reality. In the mean time, count your change the next time you pay at say Sirena. Some of the simplest addition seems to be extremely hard. One would think this issue was created by the schools they attended, but lets ignore the other students that went to the same schools as them and were their classmates but know that 2 + 2 = 4. Maybe what the teacher taught went in some ears and eyes much better than in others.

A person can be taught under a mango tree or in a very fancy school and if they don't want to learn, there is nothing anyone can do about it.
lol

I'm better educated than most of the population and in a field that has to do with money. You?
Go to the Great Great Eden Rock, St Barts.
 

NALs

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You are aware They weren’t born poor! They knew how to read, converse and think! That is what that little trick of being educated can help with.
Go ahead and tell that to the average Dominican dropping school. What percentage failed/got a low score in math and reading in the last PISA? Many of the ones that did pass went to the same schools and had the same teachers as them.

Here is a quick experiment you should do some time. Go to NYC and notice how many Dominicans are even carrying books or even a newspaper in the subway/walking in the street. You know, as is common to see in say Hasidic Jews. If you see one, take a photo. The average Hasidic Jew household see income levels that are unheard of in most Dominican household.
 
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NALs

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Go to the Great Great Eden Rock, St Barts.
Better to go to Casa de Campo with is not only the largest gsted community in the Caribbean, but 70% of the homes are owned by Dominicans. You will be very hard pressed finding a place like that in St Barts and that is only one of many Dominican places.
 

Nadie21

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Most of the people now with household names not that long ago were nobodies so to speak. The Dominican government granted scholarships to many to study in universities abroad and that was based on their academic record. If it wasn't for that, it's very likely they would had never gone. In the case of Frank Rainieri, he felt much pressure to stay in the USA at the time he decided to return to the DR. For many years afterwards people actually felt sorry for him including his own family members that would tell him to give up on that "pipe dream." Of course, no one feels sorry for him now, but that's now. For a good amount of his life he was ine of the subjects of the gossip in Santo Domingo.
I am impressed..you are Also part of the Rainieri inner circle. I guess you all met at Mama Luisa’s where you got your “info”. Bottom line DR needs to educate, inspire and motivate its fellow countrymen to want to move forward. That comes with inspired motivated teachers, of which now there do not seem to be many. Ask why?
 

Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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I would argue that a good functioning education system is one where each and every child ( well, at least a majority ), are giving the tools to function and sustain themselves in a given society.

Just because a few % come out ahead does not mean the education system works, quite the contrary. Those same few % would have achieved no matter what.
I met a couple of wealthy, very wealthy Sierra-Leon guys ( no idea what the adjective is ), so i guess their education system is just fine.

Nobody in the DR wants any meaningful change to education, not the wealthy minority who are just doing fine, not the masses because they dont really know any better and are quite content with the little they have ( any guesses why ? ), not the embryo of a middle class who are just happy to raise a bit above the fray, not the tourists who just want cheap holidays, not the few expats who also just want a cheaper-than-back-home lifestyle.

As long as the dominican people do not realize they picked-- and are still picking--the short straw, statu quo will prevail.
Agree 100%.

Imagine if education systems around the world banked in a handful of successful students and called it good enough.

There are people who see the real issues and work for real change.

They are a significant minority.
 

NALs

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I am impressed..you are Also part of the Rainieri inner circle. I guess you all met at Mama Luisa’s where you got your “info”. Bottom line DR needs to educate, inspire and motivate its fellow countrymen to want to move forward. That comes with inspired motivated teachers, of which now there do not seem to be many. Ask why?
Dominicans don't like to read and no amount of money changes that. It's very tough to have a good educational system when the people are not interested in that. Any doubts, ask the Puerto Ricans.

Its like walking, which Dominicans don't like either and this has existed for centuries. Guess what? Puerto Ricans don't like to walk either. What happens when fatty foods are made cheaply and much more readily available to a population that doesn't like to walk? Ever been in Puerto Rico lately?
 

Nadie21

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Go ahead and tell that to the average Dominican dropping school. What percentage failed/got a low score in math and reading in the last PISA? Many of the ones that did pass went to the same schools and had the same teachers as them.

Here is a quick experiment you should do some time. Go to NYC and notice how many Dominicans are even carrying books or even a newspaper in the subway/walking in the street. You know, as is common to see in say Hasidic Jews. If you see one, take a photo. The average Hasidic Jew household see income levels that are unheard of in most Dominican household.
I Am in NYC.And you dare throw Hasidic Jews into your mix and you infer whaaat? Try comparing extremely poor Hasidic Jews of which you seem to think there are none to Dominicans? Really get a grip! Are you delusional or what? Really the nerve. Books are hardly carried on subway these days. One reads on ones tablet.
 

Nadie21

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Dominicans don't like to read and no amount of money changes that. It's very tough to have a good educational system when the people are not interested in that. Any doubts, ask the Puerto Ricans.

Its like walking, which Dominicans don't like either and this has existed for centuries. Guess what? Puerto Ricans don't like to walk either. What happens when fatty foods are made cheaply and much more readily available to a population that doesn't like to walk? Ever been in Puerto Rico lately?
Well it was about 3 yrs ago. It was a wonderful trip thank you. My brother is married to a Puerto Rican and they have been back and forth many times. It has been tough they have said. When we were there beautiful San Juan was desperately trying to recover. Many closed shops, but the restaurants were fabulous. Walking you say? Well here in NYC..everyone walks…Dominicans, puerto Ricans, Jew, Catholics, Muslims, Hindus.
It sounds like you also have a vendetta against Puerto Rico? Have you been gaslighted? What gives with your very severe approach to anything other than DR? An educated person should be able to see things from Every side.
 
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CristoRey

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At the risk of sounding gringo, here's my answer to that: correctomundo.

I understand Frank Elías Rainieri studied at La Sorborne, but I'd venture to hazard a guess that dad pulled strings.
I would say the same about Luis as he attended both Harvard and Dartmouth.
 
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Nadie21

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Better to go to Casa de Campo with is not only the largest gsted community in the Caribbean, but 70% of the homes are owned by Dominicans. You will be very hard pressed finding a place like that in St Barts and that is only one of many Dominican places.
Casa de Campo was lovely…sorry but there is no comparson to Eden Rock. It is, besides gorgeous area, the educated management and staff at this grand hotel, and the french cuisine which certainly puts it over the top. Not talking about gated community. A bit different than A1s in Bavaro.
 

Naked_Snake

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Sep 2, 2008
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The guy that owns Santo Domingo motwrs was born poor.
Naysayers always make the same kind of mistakes when analyzing Dominican society under the same lens used to do the rest of Latin American societies, when in fact the DR have a few quirks making it quite the particular case. For starters, one can probably count with the fingers of one hand the families of money that date their fortunes back to the colonial era, specially since most of the original colonial top brass fled the island during and after the Haitian revolution and the intervening wars with the neighboring state that arose on its wake.
 

Naked_Snake

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Dominicans don't like to read and no amount of money changes that. It's very tough to have a good educational system when the people are not interested in that. Any doubts, ask the Puerto Ricans.

Its like walking, which Dominicans don't like either and this has existed for centuries. Guess what? Puerto Ricans don't like to walk either. What happens when fatty foods are made cheaply and much more readily available to a population that doesn't like to walk? Ever been in Puerto Rico lately?
How do you explain the differing Cuban attitudes towards that in comparison? Could the fact of their having been originally a wealthier society than DR and PR explain the different attitudes towards literacy and education in general?
 

aarhus

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Jun 10, 2008
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How do you explain the differing Cuban attitudes towards that in comparison? Could the fact of their having been originally a wealthier society than DR and PR explain the different attitudes towards literacy and education in general?
I think that could be true. I have often heard from Cubans how the Castro revolution tried to claim it was them when in fact they already had a tradition. Nowadays the Cuban educational system seems to be going backwards though and I don’t think it’s much better now than in the DR. During PLD I actually thought the DR public education system was catching up and going past Cubas. Now with the new “Tourism Industry” obsessed government that seems to be over.
 
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NALs

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How do you explain the differing Cuban attitudes towards that in comparison? Could the fact of their having been originally a wealthier society than DR and PR explain the different attitudes towards literacy and education in general?
It could be. Cubans have always been better educated than Dominicans. Cuba was also one of the principal destination for Spanish immigration basically until the USA took over. Havana is basically a Spanish city plucked in the Western Hemisphere with the added advantage that for many years it was ahead of not just most cities in the hemisphere but also major cities in Spain such as Barcelona and Madrid. Many places in Havana such as the Paseo del Prado already existed when the Americans took over and by that time it had at least three decades in existence. Other places were rebuilt after the Americans, but is basically a continuation of what was created by the Spaniards. For example, the Hotel Inglés is a different building, but on that spot the Hotel Inglés has existed since the times of the Spaniards. The National Theater is another one which occupies the same spot (and replaced) the Teatro Tacón, which was the largest theater in the world. Many other places within and outside Old Havana are like that. That's a sign of the level of development it had. In the DR itself the image that was had of Havana was greater than of NYC and people spoke of Havana as if it was the greatest thing in existence. Then Fidel came to power…
 

NALs

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Casa de Campo was lovely…sorry but there is no comparson to Eden Rock. It is, besides gorgeous area, the educated management and staff at this grand hotel, and the french cuisine which certainly puts it over the top. Not talking about gated community. A bit different than A1s in Bavaro.
That means you know Casa de Campo is over half the size of all of St Barts.


:censored:
 

bob saunders

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Dominicans don't like to read and no amount of money changes that. It's very tough to have a good educational system when the people are not interested in that. Any doubts, ask the Puerto Ricans.

Its like walking, which Dominicans don't like either and this has existed for centuries. Guess what? Puerto Ricans don't like to walk either. What happens when fatty foods are made cheaply and much more readily available to a population that doesn't like to walk? Ever been in Puerto Rico lately?
Could have fooled me. There are hundreds walking in the morning and evening when I go for my walks. Lots running and biking as well.
 

bob saunders

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It could be. Cubans have always been better educated than Dominicans. Cuba was also one of the principal destination for Spanish immigration basically until the USA took over. Havana is basically a Spanish city plucked in the Western Hemisphere with the added advantage that for many years it was ahead of not just most cities in the hemisphere but also major cities in Spain such as Barcelona and Madrid. Many places in Havana such as the Paseo del Prado already existed when the Americans took over and by that time it had at least three decades in existence. Other places were rebuilt after the Americans, but is basically a continuation of what was created by the Spaniards. For example, the Hotel Inglés is a different building, but on that spot the Hotel Inglés has existed since the times of the Spaniards. The National Theater is another one which occupies the same spot (and replaced) the Teatro Tacón, which was the largest theater in the world. Many other places within and outside Old Havana are like that. That's a sign of the level of development it had. In the DR itself the image that was had of Havana was greater than of NYC and people spoke of Havana as if it was the greatest thing in existence. Then Fidel came to power…
Problem with Habana is the infrastructure dates back to when the Americans built it and it is mostly a crumbling city, as is the country. My SIL was a high school math and music teacher in Southern Cuba, although her family mainly lives in Habana. She has nothing good to say about the Cuban school system. Her parents both says it was better before Castro. My brother ran a micro finance in Habana for three years and he has wonderful things to say about Cuban people but nothing but disgust for the government.
 

Nadie21

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That means you know Casa de Campo is over half the size of all of St Barts.


:censored:
And what does that have anything to do with hotels, pray tell. Please stick to the conversation. Haha..size is Not everything.
 
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