Irrigation Canal at Masacre River

bob saunders

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Anybody aware of the DR-Haiti border problems knew something like this was an eventuality. President Abinader has run out of diplomatic options and is finally drawing the line in the sand. Keeping the border closed will sharpen the international focus on the Haitian situation and the need for intervention. His actions maybe the catalyst the UN needs to approve the overdue Kenyan military intervention and Haitian refugee assistance through the UN-HCR.

Someone posted the people behind the water diversion project are doing it to create internal conflict in Haiti. That’s blatantly redundant given the collapse of the government and rise in gang violence during the past two years. Life in Haiti simply can’t get any worse.

I’m hoping President Abinader holds fast with the border closure and the UN blinks. The bloated members at the UN General Assembly financial trough need a rude awakening. Abinader is already the front runner in the next presidential election. If his actions result in any degree of resolution to the border problem, it will guarantee his presidency for another four years.

As much as I sympathize with the plight of the general Haitian population who I suspect just what peace and the ability to live a normal life, they are victims of their own demise. I think Luis thought long and hard about his decision and it wasn’t an easy one. He knows how ineffectual the current Haitian government is and closing the border was his only option. More to the point, I don’t think he cares about the negative international attention. He’s putting the interests of his citizens ahead of all else. One of the attributes of a good politician.

This is not about the canal or the previous DR-Haiti water use agreements. The DR government could easily divert the water flow below the new canal. International agreements are only effective if there is a credible government in power to enforce the agreement on both sides of the border. This is about the long term cultural, social, and economic survival of the DR.
I agree with most of your statement. A political calculation for re-election as well, a necessary step to put Haiti and the rest of the world om notice that the status quo isn't good enough. The Headwaters of the river are in the DR and it could be diverted from Haiti. Shared use of a limited resource almost always causes conflict.
 
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Ecoman1949

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I agree with most of your statement. A political calculation for re-election as well, a necessary step to put Haiti and the rest of the world om notice that the status quo isn't good enough. The Headwaters of the river are in the DR and it could be diverted from Haiti. Shared use of a limited resource almost always causes conflict.
I agree Bob. Shared use of limited valuable resources causes conflict, especially in the presence of a political vacuum. The proponents of the canal are taking advantage of the political disarray in their country with impunity. The President needs to hold them accountable if the Haitian government fails to do so.
 
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chico bill

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Like I said many times before - water is the resource this island is short of and will lead to stopping development
 

NALs

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That's the reason they are building so many dams. 17, IIRC
The things with dams on Hispaniola is that 99% of the big ones (and could be the case with the little ones too) are in the Dominican side, all built by the Dominican government mostly by Trujillo and especially Balaguer. I think there is only one big one in Haiti on the Artibonite River (which is also born in the DR and that's the most important river for Haiti.)

By the looks of things, it will continue to be like that for a very long time.

I think the resevoir created by the single large dam in Haiti is used mostly for agricultural purposes, unlike the various resevoirs in the DR which have many uses with agriculture one of them. For example, much of the water that reaches homes in Greater Santo Domingo comes from the Valdesia dam reservoir. Where does Port-au-Prince gets its water from (other than rain water)?
 

NALs

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For a few days Dominican newspapers have run articles about a "mass emigration of Haitians" through the northern border. That is large numbers of Haitians are moving back to Haiti.

Now there is even a video about this. The suppose exodus is due to the conflict surrounding the Dajabón River.

What could be the extent of this? Is the mass emigration of Haitians throughout the DR or only those living in Dajabón and vicinity?

 

lifeisgreat

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There goes our construction labourers …shortages of labour as is…interesting see what happens now!
 
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chico bill

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That's the reason they are building so many dams. 17, IIRC
Dams are great, especially since the rivers are so abused no one can safely fish them. But you have to deliver that water and what I have seen of the pipeline work and extremely high pump failure rate, rusting water tanks, etc. there is no hope water can get to where it's needed - into homes and businesses.
Heck even the ancient Arabs in The Alhambra had more sophisticated hydraulic engineers.
 
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ricpaq

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Shouldn't it have been obvious to the canal builders that the DR could simply redirect the river?

You'd think so, right?
Am I looking at the map incorrectly? Doesn't the river border both nations? I am not a land surveyor so please someone explain how one side could take control of the entire river in that case,
 

chico bill

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Am I looking at the map incorrectly? Doesn't the river border both nations? I am not a land surveyor so please someone explain how one side could take control of the entire river in that case,
The river was the natural border, which is a common thing from years ago
 

cavok

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Am I looking at the map incorrectly? Doesn't the river border both nations? I am not a land surveyor so please someone explain how one side could take control of the entire river in that case,
For the most part, yes, but there's a very short section of the river that is entirely on the Haitian side of the border. That's where thy are digging the canal,.
 

bob saunders

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For the most part, yes, but there's a very short section of the river that is entirely on the Haitian side of the border. That's where thy are digging the canal,.
The headwaters are in the DR, but none of that matter because there is an agreement in place that is being broken by using this canal
 
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