Jovenel Moïse is a dictator at this point...

Yourmaninvegas

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Haiti’s turmoil worries UN Security Council as fatigue grows with Moïse’s one man rule​

The United States voiced exasperation Monday with Haitian President Jovenel Moïse’s one-man rule, blaming his government for the country’s delayed legislative vote during a U.N. Security Council meeting as the embattled leader tried to defend himself on the world stage.

Representing the U.S, Ambassador Jeffrey DeLaurentis reminded fellow diplomats that legislative elections in Haiti were due in October 2019. Both before and after that date, he said, the council “repeatedly called on Haiti’s political stakeholders to come together, to set aside their differences, and to find a way forward.”

“They chose not to do so,” DeLaurentis said. “However, ultimate responsibility for creating an atmosphere conducive to free and fair elections, and then conducting those elections, must rest on the government. The United States is disturbed that Haiti’s prolonged period of rule by decree continues. “

The U.S.’s stance came as the Caribbean nation is embroiled in a worsening political crisis and the international community expresses mounting concern at Moïse’s rule. In an unusual move, the president himself spoke at the meeting, accusing “powerful oligarchs” and a “radical opposition” for his nation’s woes. Diplomats weren’t convinced, calling Haiti’s deteriorating state of affairs under his leadership “worrying” and “shocking.”

“Unpredictability looms large,” Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Ambassador I. Rhonda King said.

Moïse has been ruling by decree for over a year. Opposition leaders contend his time in office ended Feb. 7. Moïse disagrees, saying he has another year as president. His detractors have gone so far as to install their own interim president.

Speaking at the virtual event, Moïse accused the opposition of creating armed gangs, said drug traffickers were behind a rogue police outfit known as Fantom 509 that has been carrying out flash protests across the capital and attacking government property and dismissed concerns about attacks against journalists.

He told the council that people “dressed up as journalists” attacked the police force.

Moïse also defended his overzealous use of executive orders and the removal of three Supreme Court judges, which has been denounced as a violation of Haiti’s constitution by a number of foreign diplomats and human rights groups.

“The violent attempts over many times to overthrow the constitutional government by corrupt people have left the situation very difficult,” Moïse said in his remarks, which went 20 minutes over his allotted 5 minutes. “This policy of chaos has meant that the government has had to take off the gloves.”

U.N. Secretary General António Guterres’ latest report on Haiti, released ahead of the Security Council meeting, paints a worrisome picture of Haiti’s ongoing crisis. Human rights defenders, journalists, judges, lawyers and others continue to be the target of threats and acts of intimidation, with at least 13 documented cases between September and January, the report said.

In the past 12 months, kidnappings increased by 200% compared with the previous year, the report found. Homicides were also up, increasing by 20% in 2020, with three quarters of the cases recorded in the western part of the country, which encompasses the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area.

“The human rights situation in Haiti continued to be negatively affected by the activity of gangs and the continued failure of State authorities to adequately protect citizens’ rights to life and security,” the report concluded.

The report noted the government has said it is working to address public safety issues, increasing the budget for the Haiti National Police force. But investigators also found “scant impact on the Haitian criminal justice system.”

The U.N. leader nonetheless seemed to back Moïse’s push to change the constitution, saying that a “minimum consensus among all political stakeholders” could help make it a success. The opposition has rejected his attempt to create a new magna carta and there are questions over its legality. Haitian officials have placed $20 million in a U.N.-controlled fund for the constitutional referendum as well as legislative, municipal, local and presidential elections slated for the fall.

Guterres’ representative in Haiti, Helen La Lime, noted that Moïse’s recent decrees effectively retiring three Supreme Court judges and appointing their replacements prompted several magistrates’ associations to go on strike and renewed protests demanding his departure from office. She also noted the moves could further paralyze an already dysfunctional judicial system.

Security Council members conveyed Monday that they view elections as the only way out of the crisis.

“I have no reservation at all in stating that this situation is untenable in the long-term,” France’s Assistant Permanent Representative Nathalie Broadhurst said, adding that some of the decrees taken by the Haitian authorities are “worrisome.”

The planned elections, Broadhurst said, were a step in the right direction but they “must contribute to an exit from the crisis and not add to current confusion.”

She then said that three conditions must be fulfilled for Haiti to gain stability: Minimal security conditions so that elections can take place in satisfactory conditions; the distribution of identification cards, to guarantee broad electoral participation; and an impartial electoral judge must be put in place so that results are accepted by everybody. Moïse has unilaterally appointed a nine-member electoral commission without political consensus to run the referendum and the elections.

But even that, France acknowledged, will require a lot of effort given the number of Haitians who still do not have a national Identification card, and what some diplomats described as an ambitious electoral calendar for September.

Moïse told council members Monday Haiti will hold the constitutional referendum in June. He previously had said April.

“It is not our place to speak on this process; we merely wish to ensure that the various stakeholders in the country have the opportunity to debate the text and its institutional implications in the long-term and above all, not further delay the conduct of the various elections,” Broadhurst said.

Ahead of Monday’s meeting, Human Rights Watch called on the council members to press the government of Haiti to uphold judicial independence, respect due process, and repeal its recent arbitrary changes to the Supreme Court’s composition.

“Getting rid of Supreme Court justices you dislike and appointing new ones without following regular processes will not solve a political crisis,” said Tamara Taraciuk Broner, deputy Americas director at Human Rights Watch. “There is no possible resolution to Haiti’s crisis without rule of law and an independent judiciary.”

In a separate report, Defend Haiti’s Democracy noted that under the current administration, systematic human rights abuses have escalated dramatically, and there is a growing consensus of civil society across Haiti, supported by international human rights professionals, activists and politicians, calling on the international community to support ordinary Haitians’ calls for urgent change.

“Politically-motivated massacres, kidnappings and murders have become a way of life for ordinary Haitians,” the report said. “Fear among the general population is of a level not experienced since the Duvalier era.”

 
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NanSanPedro

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With apologies to Greg Lake:

A bullet had found him
His blood ran as he cried
No money could save him
So he laid down and he died

Ooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooh, what a lucky man he was
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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"And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not warned from time to time that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms.... The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants." - (Thomas Jefferson in a letter to William S. Smith in 1787. Taken from Jefferson, On Democracy 20, S. Padover ed., 1939)

 
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Northern Coast Diver

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When Haiti was last ruled by dictators. they led the way in Caribbean tourism. Many Haitians then were schooled in the sciences, art, and music, in addition to the basics. That side of the island was still covered in trees. Maybe Papa Doc was tough, maybe a strong hand is required.
 

CristoRey

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When Haiti was last ruled by dictators. they led the way in Caribbean tourism. Many Haitians then were schooled in the sciences, art, and music, in addition to the basics. That side of the island was still covered in trees. Maybe Papa Doc was tough, maybe a strong hand is required.
Same thing happens across the world every single time one of these nations ruled by a dictator is "liberated"
They can kiss peace and stability good bye.
 

Naked_Snake

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Sep 2, 2008
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When Haiti was last ruled by dictators. they led the way in Caribbean tourism. Many Haitians then were schooled in the sciences, art, and music, in addition to the basics. That side of the island was still covered in trees. Maybe Papa Doc was tough, maybe a strong hand is required.
Just look at their history. Their first de facto ruler, Toussaint Louverture, made himself "governor for life" (mimicking the Consul in the metropolis, no doubt). That should tell you all you need to know.
 

Naked_Snake

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Sep 2, 2008
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"And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not warned from time to time that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms.... The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants." - (Thomas Jefferson in a letter to William S. Smith in 1787. Taken from Jefferson, On Democracy 20, S. Padover ed., 1939)

Only for a Napoleon Bonaparte to come in and crush all disorder and dissent.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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It it the position of posters above that rule by dictatorship is good ❓
Is 🇩🇴 better off being governed as a democracy or a dictatorship❓
Is Haiti better off being governed as a democracy or a dictatorship❓
Ya'll gonna continue to blow your "dog whistles"❓
 

Northern Coast Diver

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I don't have a dog in that fight. Just a bit of Hispaniola history. Haiti's problems have only grown since independence. Far be it from me to tell a sovereign nation how to rule their affairs, I will leave that to you!
 
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Naked_Snake

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Yourmaninvegas,

Seems to me that none of their subsequent rulers have been able to measure up with Toussaint, Dessalines, Christophe, Petion or even Boyer. As for the DR, I would take Balaguer over any of the current crop of clowns, yes. So that should answer your question.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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I don't have a dog in that fight. Just a bit of Hispaniola history. Haiti's problems have only grown since independence. Far be it from me to tell a sovereign nation how to rule their affairs, I will leave that to you!
You and I are in agreement.
Problems have grown.
But due to outside influence.
The people of Haiti are the ones that need to solve the problems of Haiti.
Dictatorship is not the answer in my opinion.
Others may, do and can disagree.
Without blowing their "dog whistles".
But I doubt that is possible.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Yourmaninvegas,

Seems to me that none of their subsequent rulers have been able to measure up with Toussaint, Dessalines, Christophe, Petion or even Boyer. As for the DR, I would take Balaguer over any of the current crop of clowns, yes. So that should answer your question.
Indeed it does ‼️
 

NanSanPedro

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Yourmaninvegas,

Seems to me that none of their subsequent rulers have been able to measure up with Toussaint, Dessalines, Christophe, Petion or even Boyer. As for the DR, I would take Balaguer over any of the current crop of clowns, yes. So that should answer your question.

I don't remember who but some of those guys enslaved other Haitians after they booted out the French.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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I don't remember who but some of those guys enslaved other Haitians after they booted out the French.
You know that some of these guys don't have a problem with slavery Bro.
Check where they hail from ‼️
"Under President Thomas Jefferson’s presidency, the United States cut off aid to L’Ouverture and instead pursued a policy to isolate Haiti, fearing that the Haitian revolution would spread to the United States."
Same thing happens across the world every single time one of these nations ruled by a dictator is "liberated"
They can kiss peace and stability good bye.
And this guy...
Yourmaninvegas,

Seems to me that none of their subsequent rulers have been able to measure up with Toussaint, Dessalines, Christophe, Petion or even Boyer. As for the DR, I would take Balaguer over any of the current crop of clowns, yes. So that should answer your question.
 

Naked_Snake

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Sep 2, 2008
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You know that some of these guys don't have a problem with slavery Bro.
Check where they hail from ‼️
"Under President Thomas Jefferson’s presidency, the United States cut off aid to L’Ouverture and instead pursued a policy to isolate Haiti, fearing that the Haitian revolution would spread to the United States."

And this guy...
Newsflash for you, the Haitian revolution, when it comes down to it, was never about ending slavery, but about replacing the French as the ones calling the shots regardless of the economic system in place.
 
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Naked_Snake

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I don't remember who but some of those guys enslaved other Haitians after they booted out the French.
Answering your question, and ironically and funnily enough, it was the black ones the ones that were hardcore enough about keeping the plantation system in place (the tryad Toussaint-Dessalines-Christophe). I'd bet they would never tell you this at afram history month up there in the States.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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Answering your question, and ironically and funnily enough, it was the black ones the ones that were hardcore enough about keeping the plantation system in place (the tryad Toussaint-Dessalines-Christophe). I'd bet they would never tell you this at afram history month up there in the States.
I will leave it to you to proffer HIStory my man.
Continue to educate from your country of origin.
Continue to drag your issues that you have not been able to resolve in your own country of origin and post about them here.
I don't worry about those who still want to wear white hoodies in the 🇩🇴 (that is if you even live here).
Did you learn about who was behind the success of Jack Daniels (a former slave) from me❓
After all, education is education.
Happy February to you also‼️

Too busy enjoying myself here in 🇩🇴 .
I will now return to my regular enjoyment of life.
Haiti is the next to the country where I live.
I have an interest in it.
I believe the people who live there will resolve their issues.
I do not believe dictatorship is the answer.