Many Haitians Oppose International Intervention

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
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The worst part of all the chaos is there are a lot of innocent people that become collateral damage. The Haitian people somehow have to stand up to the gangs and corrupt government without giving up hope. If history has taught us one thing, it's any puppet government that is put in place will be just as bad as the one that just got thrown out.
Until the Haitian people hit the bottom and want change its just gonna get worse. They really have to figure out what they want and start organizing it.
I think that's the problem. When you think Haiti reached the lowest, there it goes further digging. Is there a true bottom for Haiti? It seems it's a bottomless pit.
 
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Northern Coast Diver

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This morning's Dominican news featured US troops. On the ground, in Dajabon, yesterday. I don't think they are there working on their tans.
 

windeguy

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This morning's Dominican news featured US troops. On the ground, in Dajabon, yesterday. I don't think they are there working on their tans.
Part of that Elite Disaster Team, perhaps? Just in time for the shootings across the border to start.

Personally I think those troops, if there, are wasting their time and in jeopardy for no good reason.
 

windeguy

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The U.S. Global Fragility Act of 2019 authorizes multi-agency intervention in “fragile” countries like Haiti, the U.S. military being one such agency.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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Those who are opposed to international intervention in Haiti only need to be prepared to take up arms against the elements within the country that are acting contra to law in order in society.
The problem is not going to solve itself without the use of force.
They should be given those arms ‼️
 

kingofdice

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Jan 16, 2002
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That would be a good thing. Nobody wants to see anybody killed, but the reality is that the Haitian criminal gangs have killed hundreds if not thousands. The government needs to show the gangs the downside of kidnapping, torturing and killing everyday citizens. The government and it's institutions cannot move forward without security. That's square one. Consequently, the gang leaders must go the way of the graveyard in short order.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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Whatever happen to due process?

Are we talking the gang leaders being killed during combat?
Or straight mafia like hits by the forces that have approval?
Without some law and order or rules of war being applied it is just one gang vs another with uniforms.
Remember currently there is not an elected official running 🇭🇹.
 

windeguy

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Whatever happen to due process?

Are we talking the gang leaders being killed during combat?
Or straight mafia like hits by the forces that have approval?
Without some law and order or rules of war being applied it is just one gang vs another with uniforms.
Remember currently there is not an elected official running 🇭🇹.
Then rules of war are out the window with no real government, no?
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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What is the difference between a non-international armed conflict and a "civil war"?​

There is no real difference. The term "civil war" has no legal meaning as such. It is used by some to refer to a non-international armed conflict. Article 3 common to the Geneva Conventions – called "common" because it is identical in each of the four Geneva Conventions – does not use the term "civil war," but refers instead to "armed conflict not of an international character."

The ICRC generally avoids using the term "civil war" when communicating with the parties to an armed conflict or publicly, and speaks instead of "non-international" or "internal" armed conflicts, as these expressions mirror the terms used in common Article 3.


Then rules of war are out the window with no real government, no?
Asked and answered.
 

reilleyp

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Dec 12, 2006
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I think you have to divide the argument as far as imperialism vs throwing money at a bad situation. Sure, the US and other countries throw money at bad situations with no real plan for the long term. The US has never "made money" on Haiti. Maybe a few private citizens did, whether it was selling rice or mining gold, or UN personnel in nice hotels, or the Clintons and others, but the US government and me the US taxpayer never recouped whatever US tax dollars were spent there.
When you look at other islands who are under the control of other imperialistic countries, you would have to admit that the Caymans, Bermuda, and many others are in much better condition than Haiti and Cuba. You can go burn the flags of the rich who steal from Haiti, burn the flags of the drug lords who use it as a place to get fuel, but keep in mind that there are no US taxpayers living the good life off of any revenue coming from Haiti.
Nothing against Haiti, I hope the situation gets resolved. I just hate to see our flag getting burned, because mom and pop taxpayer have nothing against you.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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When you look at other islands who are under the control of other imperialistic countries, you would have to admit that the Caymans, Bermuda, and many others are in much better condition than Haiti and Cuba.
Haiti and Cuba have both experienced incredibly harsh conditions that have hampered their economic development. I won't give the history lesson. The one for Haiti is readily available in the postings in the Haiti forum in general and on the internet in depth.
Nothing against Haiti, I hope the situation gets resolved. I just hate to see our flag getting burned, because mom and pop taxpayer have nothing against you.
I like to see freedom of expression. Helps those countries that think they are all that to get some perspective on what they have/are doing to others in the world. Burn baby Burn🔥 👏
 

bob saunders

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Haiti and Cuba have both experienced incredibly harsh conditions that have hampered their economic development. I won't give the history lesson. The one for Haiti is readily available in the postings in the Haiti forum in general and on the internet in depth.

I like to see freedom of expression. Helps those countries that think they are all that to get some perspective on what they have/are doing to others in the world. Burn baby Burn🔥 👏
The only thing that has hampered both countries is their leadership.
 
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JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
Jan 7, 2016
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Haiti and Cuba have both experienced incredibly harsh conditions that have hampered their economic development. I won't give the history lesson. The one for Haiti is readily available in the postings in the Haiti forum in general and on the internet in depth.

I like to see freedom of expression. Helps those countries that think they are all that to get some perspective on what they have/are doing to others in the world. Burn baby Burn🔥 👏

Are you a veteran by any chance?