Word of the day

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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I have never heard of it but I am not surprised since I am not too familiar with all things Spain (except the language of course). The most curious aspect to me was the name of the dish. I thought why garbanzos viudos and not just garbanzos o potaje de garbanzos. I found a recipe that briefly explains why the dish is given that name. I don’t like chickpeas. Therefore, there is a very high probability that I would be eating something else if given the choice.

I'd never heard of it despite being familiar with Spain. I came across it by chance last week in a discussion about traditional foods that were suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

In both cases, the implication is that a meat-free dish is considered deficient. Dominicans call their vegetable soup foolish (sopa boba) and the Spaniards compare these chickpea or lentil soups to being widowed. It also reminds me of patatas a lo pobre, a famous Andalusian dish made potatoes with onions, garlic and green peppers, and lots of olive oil. If you added chorizo it would probably no longer be considered a poor person's dish.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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I'd never heard of it despite being familiar with Spain. I came across it by chance last week in a discussion about traditional foods that were suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

In both cases, the implication is that a meat-free dish is considered deficient. Dominicans call their vegetable soup foolish (sopa boba) and the Spaniards compare these chickpea or lentil soups to being widowed. It also reminds me of patatas a lo pobre, a famous Andalusian dish made potatoes with onions, garlic and green peppers, and lots of olive oil. If you added chorizo it would probably no longer be considered a poor person's dish.

Yes, I understood that to be the meaning behind the description garbanzos viudos after reading it. Since I’m neither vegetarian nor vegan it does not bother me but some may find the name annoying because of what it implies.
 
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Chirimoya

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Yes, I understood that to be the meaning behind the description garbanzos viudos after reading it. Since I’m neither vegetarian nor vegan it does not bother me but some may find the name annoying because of what it implies.
I'm vegetarian and don't find it annoying, it's just a reflection of culture and tradition. As in not having meat = poverty. Just like being fat and pale used to be considered desirable because it meant you were prosperous and didn't have to expose your skin to sunlight.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Aug 27- ubicar (see the link in the first post for the meaning)

*
This is a very good word to know .
 
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Tom F.

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Jan 1, 2002
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Only in the DR though and possibly in other Caribbean Spanish-speaking countries where caco means head.

I always thought the word for head in Dominican Spanish is casco in reference to a helmet, pronounced caco. I tend to use cabeza.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
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I always thought the word for head in Dominican Spanish is casco in reference to a helmet, pronounced caco. I tend to use cabeza.

Cabeza is standard Spanish.

Caco is a Dominican colloquialism that means head. See the link 👇


 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Aug 29- concordar (see the link in the first post for the meaning)

Same meaning as Estar de acuerdo


This is a stem changing verb therefore like many Spanish verbs you have to learn the forms. Start with the present tense (indicative) and move on from there.

Present tense- Indicative

Concuerdo
Concuerdas
Concuerda
Concordamos
Concordáis (Spain only)
Concuerdan
 
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Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
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Aug 31- espada (see the link in the first post for the meaning)


Also this includes the word of the day daily postings. The month of August was done in full and if you like the Spanish word of the day link have a look at it everyday to learn new words, listen to correct pronunciation and see examples of usage.

You can still post questions and share knowledge in this thread.


Buena suerte.

 
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Africaida

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Jun 19, 2009
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Interesting words.

I don't see the links you mention @Marianopolita but I use wordreference.com.

Bufanda-didnt know it, not sure if I ll ever use it.

Espada-new word as well (being in the land of machetes y colins :D ) but learned entre la espada y la pared.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Interesting words.

I don't see the links you mention @Marianopolita but I use wordreference.com.

Bufanda-didnt know it, not sure if I ll ever use it.

Espada-new word as well (being in the land of machetes y colins :D ) but learned entre la espada y la pared.

Yes, I find the words interesting as well. I like reading the examples of usage. The words are generic more Spain usage from what I can see rather than Latin American. However, Spanish is Spanish.


Can you see the box in my first and last post? That is the link just click on it. Let me know if you can access it.

I use word reference too as my main online dictionary but there are many good ones and Collins which I also like is a tab within word reference when you look up a word.


Entre la espada y la pared

An everyday expression in Spanish. Add that one to your list for sure.

Bufanda- scarf....well I guess it depends where you live but for students it’s an article of clothing so it’s good to know.


I also like the word of the day today- aplazar. Very good to know.