Dominican Arrested Twice for Deportation

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
3,292
2,589
113
-

drstock

Silver
Oct 29, 2010
4,576
2,164
113
Cabarete
Activists claims all sorts of things are not true or are exaggerations. Often, they only tell one side of the debate.
It is true that activists may sometimes exaggerate things to make their point, but in this case the article confirms what I know about, not heard from activists but from people I know who have experienced it personally. And, as I have said before, I have seen my Dominican friend locked up in a cell with my own eyes.
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,164
3,020
113
Surely one can imagine there are "orders from the top" and "quota" systems in place. Why is this so different from every country, city, state, in the universe? Does this system of arrests and deportation seem unique to the DR? Nope. Quite honesty I think it's the norm even in first world countries. Luis will not be stopped in his efforts to change the old and become the new DR.The DR will become the #1 country in the Caribbean in finance, tourism, and border control. If you think the graft at the border will continue to allow undocumented Haitian to dance to and fro with the DR...you're mistaken. NOTHING is forever.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bachata

mountainannie

Platinum
Dec 11, 2003
16,350
1,358
113
elizabetheames.blogspot.com
https://do.usembassy.gov/alert-ongoing-dominican-migration-enforcement/. There may be another thread on this news? I know that there was a Big Noise from the US Embassy back around 2013 when some discos refused entry to some Black US Embassy personnel. The reports coming back from HaitianTwitter are of pretty serious mistreatment - not beatings or the like - but crowding and being deprived of water - and legal residents with proper papers being deported.

I doing my bit by posting https://www.spanish.academy/blog/the-history-of-dominican-republics-independence-day/ since few Haitians know about the history of the DR - or only think that Haiti "freed the slaves in the DR"

But the PACE of these deportations is really reflecting badly on the DR -- calls arising again to ban tourism -- etc..( not that those who do not want black skinned tourists will mind)

I know how complex the issue is in the DR - (But being White with Blue Eyes I have never been on the receiving end...Unfortunately - Trujillo taught Dominicans that they were ONLY descended from Europeans and Indians - erased all mentions of Africa - so even dark skinned Dominicans in the barrios may not feel much kinship...
https://www.ipsnews.net/2008/11/haiti-dominican-republic-media-unites-to-fight-stereotypes/
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,164
3,020
113
Do really think as the temps in the East coast of the US drop like a stone any of the people that can AFFORD to come here will think twice about our methods of deportation?? I can't go any further with illustating my point using the views of those in the USA about "borders" as this will drift to US policies.IMO you are over confident about world wide opinions are this subject being in favor of open borders.
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,164
3,020
113
I see the deportation of undocumented Haitians as a plus for attracting tourists. I am limiting my opinions on deportating to tourism for the moment.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NanSanPedro

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
6,756
5,843
113
Boca Chica
yeshaiticanprogram.com
I see the deportation of undocumented Haitians as a plus for attracting tourists. I am limiting my opinions on deportating to tourism for the moment.
I would think that the overwhelming majority of tourists are AI and won't venture out of their enclave. This has no effect on them except to maybe cement them further in their rooms with their margueritas.

This will affect the few thousand tourists who want to venture out and see the country. This country has a lot to see so that would be a detriment.
 
  • Like
Reactions: johne

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,808
6,196
113
dr1.com
What you see high up in the hills of Jarabacoa hills is apparently different from what is happening elsewhere in the country, or maybe you are not aware in how things have changed in the last few weeks.
I live surrounded by Haitians and Jarabacoa is booming with contruction and agriculture so plenty of jobs. One of the large public school has Haitians as more than 40 percent of their student population. The government wouldnt be doing their job if they werent trying to control illegal immigration. How do you humainly arrest and deport people? Jarabacoa has approx 56,000 legal residents and probably another 10,000 illegal Haitians. We have plenty of Colombians...etc.
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,808
6,196
113
dr1.com
https://do.usembassy.gov/alert-ongoing-dominican-migration-enforcement/. There may be another thread on this news? I know that there was a Big Noise from the US Embassy back around 2013 when some discos refused entry to some Black US Embassy personnel. The reports coming back from HaitianTwitter are of pretty serious mistreatment - not beatings or the like - but crowding and being deprived of water - and legal residents with proper papers being deported.

I doing my bit by posting https://www.spanish.academy/blog/the-history-of-dominican-republics-independence-day/ since few Haitians know about the history of the DR - or only think that Haiti "freed the slaves in the DR"

But the PACE of these deportations is really reflecting badly on the DR -- calls arising again to ban tourism -- etc..( not that those who do not want black skinned tourists will mind)

I know how complex the issue is in the DR - (But being White with Blue Eyes I have never been on the receiving end...Unfortunately - Trujillo taught Dominicans that they were ONLY descended from Europeans and Indians - erased all mentions of Africa - so even dark skinned Dominicans in the barrios may not feel much kinship...
https://www.ipsnews.net/2008/11/haiti-dominican-republic-media-unites-to-fight-stereotypes/
The more noise the UN makes the tougher the Dominican government will get. Have you visited the museums in Santiago? Plenty of evidence of African origins are displayed and noted. The current textbooks used in high school certainly mention the African influences in Dominican culture and African origin of many of the inhabitants. The DR moved on from Trujillo many years ago.
 

drstock

Silver
Oct 29, 2010
4,576
2,164
113
Cabarete
I live surrounded by Haitians and Jarabacoa is booming with contruction and agriculture so plenty of jobs. One of the large public school has Haitians as more than 40 percent of their student population. The government wouldnt be doing their job if they werent trying to control illegal immigration. How do you humainly arrest and deport people? Jarabacoa has approx 56,000 legal residents and probably another 10,000 illegal Haitians. We have plenty of Colombians...etc.
I wouldn't presume to say that I know more about things in your area than you do, so I can only conclude that my first suggestion above was right - things are different in the rarified air of Jarabacoa than down at near sea level.
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,808
6,196
113
dr1.com
Differwnt c
I wouldn't presume to say that I know more about things in your area than you do, so I can only conclude that my first suggestion above was right - things are different in the rarified air of Jarabacoa than down at near sea level

I wouldn't presume to say that I know more about things in your area than you do, so I can only conclude that my first suggestion above was right - things are different in the rarified air of Jarabacoa than down at near sea level.
Different class of people, Probably.
 

bachata

Aprendiz de todo profesional de nada
Aug 18, 2007
5,399
1,279
113
Si! Jarabacoa where the elite meet and greet. Apoligies to the Italian restaurant that I stole this piece of wisdom.
Did you go to Restaurant that is located by Bayacanes, you can arrange a helicopter pickup in SD or Santiago.

Nice place, I drove to get there, can't afford the Heli-fly I think is US $500. From SD.

JJ
 
  • Haha
Reactions: bob saunders

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
7,164
3,020
113
Did you go to Restaurant that is located by Bayacanes, you can arrange a helicopter pickup in SD or Santiago.

Nice place, I drove to get there, can't afford the Heli-fly I think is US $500. From SD.

JJ
NOOOO. From Porto Fino Forest Hills NYC.:cool:
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,808
6,196
113
dr1.com
It is true that activists may sometimes exaggerate things to make their point, but in this case the article confirms what I know about, not heard from activists but from people I know who have experienced it personally. And, as I have said before, I have seen my Dominican friend locked up in a cell with my own eyes.
and released and not deported, with her ID still with her.
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,808
6,196
113
dr1.com
The more noise the UN makes the tougher the Dominican government will get. Have you visited the museums in Santiago? Plenty of evidence of African origins are displayed and noted. The current textbooks used in high school certainly mention the African influences in Dominican culture and African origin of many of the inhabitants. The DR moved on from Trujillo many years ago.
For sad Darcy, here is a place you can go to see the African influence in the DR. https://centroleon.org.do/ Then you won't be so sad, plus you will be better informed.
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
13,751
3,325
113
The more noise the UN makes the tougher the Dominican government will get. Have you visited the museums in Santiago? Plenty of evidence of African origins are displayed and noted. The current textbooks used in high school certainly mention the African influences in Dominican culture and African origin of many of the inhabitants. The DR moved on from Trujillo many years ago.
A person needs to know and read Spanish for that to even remotely be considered a possibility. It's very common on DR1 for people to not know Spanish at all except basic sentences like "una fría por favor." Unfortunately, that isn't found in any Dominican textbooks. lol

The kicker? Most of what has been written about the DR and different aspects of Dominican culture is in Spanish and only in Spanish, much of it not availsble outside the DR either. What is available in English is very few and much of it has a particular slant which was created from the first English-language published papers and books on the DR, often by people that were not Dominicans too. The lack of info on the DR in English is obe of the main reason for the creation of certain departments such as The Dominican Studies Institute at CUNY. If today it's few, when it was founded anything Dominican in English was almost non-existent.

Quite frankly, it's very hard for anyone to correctly understand Dominican culture if they don't know Spanish.

That's taking into account that after Spanish, what is available about the DR the most is in English. In other languages like French, German or Italia it's almost non-existent with much in French written by intellectuals that lived in Haiti when it was Saint-Domingue like 200 years ago. Many things change with time.
 
Last edited:

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
32,808
6,196
113
dr1.com

I don't see any inaccuracies.
Supports the assertions made in post #1
Lots of things you probably dont see.