Haitians in PC/Bavaro

bob saunders

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Thats the point I was making. If all your employees are registered in the TSS and you are paying for each employee. You haven’t got any illegals working for you.
My wife did hire a Venezuelan girl during the Pandemic. She was illegal but registered under the amnesty program and got her residency. She has nothing against Haitians, we had a Haitian teacher for 8 years. She now works at another school, but she was a legal resident and may even be a citizen now.
 
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chico bill

Dogs Better than People
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Yes, we have an accountant that submits all receipts, payroll.....etc. Yes you have to pay in to various pension, medical, rehabilitation, ....etc.
I bet that is something you prefer to hand off to a bookkeeper.
When I was in business building homes it was the government paperwork for payroll, worker's comp and quarterly income tax payments was something I dreaded.
I did it myself mostly because income came in chunks not regular intervals, either when I sold a home or took a draw from a bank in excess of building and labor or subcontractor expenses and I wanted to keep my thumb on the scales of what the bottom line was, as you might understand.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
May 6, 2016
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Thank you... May your kindness and care come back to you a hundred fold.
Well if that's the case I have spent a boat load in feeding and occasionally taking injured street dogs to the vet -
Hopefully there will be a group of them waiting for me when I take my earthly exit (which ain't far off) and they put in a good word with the Almighty so I get on a cloud with a nice view.
 
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I think the issue also is the illegal immigrants find employment. There is a demand and someone hires them
That is the hypocrisy of the dominicans. The informal economy they work in is illegal by itself. Cheap labor without registering or paying tax is what they already do. Status of the workers doesn’t influence that.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
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That is the hypocrisy of the dominicans. The informal economy they work in is illegal by itself. Cheap labor without registering or paying tax is what they already do. Status of the workers doesn’t influence that.
What I find more hypocritic is a person born and raised in a country of money & opportunity and then comes to a foreign country where their money seems to give them a huge advantage over most native residents.
Based on their income level and access to lawyers & Dominican agencies they are able to establish their legal status (like I and most of us on this forum have done).

Then we somehow feel far superior to others who never had a way to get a work, never able to ever save anything, let alone enough to qualify to make a application process to for residence ?

I am not campaigning for more Haitians, because the DR has reached a population limit already, and more people aren't needed.
 

bob saunders

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What I find more hypocritic is a person born and raised in a country of money & opportunity and then comes to a foreign country where their money seems to give them a huge advantage over most native residents.
Based on their income level and access to lawyers & Dominican agencies they are able to establish their legal status (like I and most of us on this forum have done).

Then we somehow feel far superior to others who never had a way to get a work, never able to ever save anything, let alone enough to qualify to make a application process to for residence ?

I am not campaigning for more Haitians, because the DR has reached a population limit already, and more people aren't needed.
All I can say is that when I had my citizenship ceremony there were a number of Haitians becoming Dominicans on the same day, around ten or so , out of 86 people.
 
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MoJoInDR

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Well if that's the case I have spent a boat load in feeding and occasionally taking injured street dogs to the vet -
Hopefully there will be a group of them waiting for me when I take my earthly exit (which ain't far off) and they put in a good word with the Almighty so I get on a cloud with a nice view.
Perhaps that's why you were given a boatload.

Getting it is one thing... What you choose to do with it is another.
 

MoJoInDR

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What I find more hypocritic is a person born and raised in a country of money & opportunity and then comes to a foreign country where their money seems to give them a huge advantage over most native residents.
Based on their income level and access to lawyers & Dominican agencies they are able to establish their legal status (like I and most of us on this forum have done).

Then we somehow feel far superior to others who never had a way to get a work, never able to ever save anything, let alone enough to qualify to make a application process to for residence ?

I am not campaigning for more Haitians, because the DR has reached a population limit already, and more people aren't needed.
I can't tell you how many times I witnessed this take place in another Caribbean island country.
 

windeguy

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Well I know he recently got his citizenship but that is a non factor. I'm legal too. We all pay taxes on purchases but I do not think he pays income tax here to which I was referring. You, because you have a school, probably have to pay income taxes.
So taxes are not taxes? Only one type of taxes matter? What? I was retired when I moved here.
In this case I think skin color is indeed a factor. It's exactly how they get singled out and rounded up. Color is a factor worldwide in every country I've lived or worked.
I am not promoting illegal crossings, yeah that's not right but none of us can understand their desperation.
But people who are obeying the law including once they are already here and after many many years here don't deserve to be robbed by police or treated like dirt.
People that are legally here are not an issue. People illegally in the DR should simply be deported without any other mistreatment no matter how many years they have been here. Time here has zero to do with it.
 

windeguy

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Except for Haitians and maybe Venezuelans, every other nationality of immigrants in the DR (including expats) are well below 1% each. Oh yes, in this forum expats are very visible given this website is en English and focused mainly on expats. In reality, even in Puerto Plata you can spend days without running into an expat. That’s considering Puerto Plata probably has a larger share of its population as expats than typical major Dominican size and many expats from Sosúa/Cabarete go to Puerto Plata town for several reasons (shop at Jumbo, etc.) In most of the DR you simply don’t see expats, don’t even know the DR has a few. When you see that the towns where expats are most visible are in some villages like Cabarete or small towns like Sosúa or Las Terrenas, that is saying saying something.

One interesting detail to know is from where is the average English speaking foreigners in the DR? The US* (despite the recent grow of African American, the vast majority are white)? Canada? Or from the English islands in the Caribbean (which means almost all are black)?

* Dominican-Americans should be separate from the rest of Americans since it goes without saying most with US passports living in the DR probably are Dominican-Americans and Dominicans that simply were born in the USA.
Absolutely true. Sometimes expats add a little more self importance to themselves than is warranted by the very small part of the population they make up.
I realized very early on that expats are insignificant outside of Cabarete/Sosua and perhaps LT. . All very small towns. And as you point out a very small number of Americans are here that are not Dominican Americans by nature of their parents. Now back to deporting illegals and issues in the southeast, I guess.
 

windeguy

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You can lose your "naturalization" under certain circumstances. So yes, the DR can remove a "citizen".

Naturalized Citizens can lose their nationality by leaving the country for ten years, or establishing residency within one year of being naturalized abroad. Accepting employment from a foreign government, committing crimes against the country, behaving immorally, or having committed fraud in a naturalization application. They can also have their nationality suspended for the period in which they may be incarcerated for capital crimes.

***I should add that this is what was told to me by the Dominican Embassy in New York. I had a question about it a few years ago so this is the answer I received*** I had to put it into "English" translation. So, it may not be perfectly worded.
How many times has that happened?
 

windeguy

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What I find more hypocritic is a person born and raised in a country of money & opportunity and then comes to a foreign country where their money seems to give them a huge advantage over most native residents.
Based on their income level and access to lawyers & Dominican agencies they are able to establish their legal status (like I and most of us on this forum have done).
My father got up at 4 AM to stoke a coal fire to bake bread. My mother sewed garments and was paid be each piece .. I got a scholarship and obtained my degrees. I worked for what I had until I was 48 and retired. I got residency in the DR before I even moved here.
Then we somehow feel far superior to others who never had a way to get a work, never able to ever save anything, let alone enough to qualify to make a application process to for residence ?
I don't feel superior. It pisses me off when anyone is allowed to abuse the the immigration system. Big difference. I feel the exact same way about illegals in my home country, and yes, I still pay taxes there. I know a number of people that abuse the system here as well as Dominicans that abuse it in the USA>

If someone cannot deal with an application for residence, they have no business being here.
I am not campaigning for more Haitians, because the DR has reached a population limit already, and more people aren't needed.
One thing I will agree upon 100%.
 

windeguy

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Could that change now the election is over ? Some employers/industries need them. It has helped grow the economy.
Very doubtful Abinader will allow more Haitian work visas. But we will see. Remember he has spoken very clearly on the point that Haitians are not the DR's problem and he won a lot of votes on that point alone.
 

aarhus

www.johnboyter.com
Jun 10, 2008
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Very doubtful Abinader will allow more Haitian work visas. But we will see. Remember he has spoken very clearly on the point that Haitians are not the DR's problem and he won a lot of votes on that point alone.
There is a demand. Issuing more work permits to Haitians is also a way of fighting illegal immigration.